Snare Drum head / Quieting head or pad for home practice

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by Kenny Blue, May 16, 2020.

  1. Kenny Blue

    Kenny Blue Silver Supporting Member

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    Well I have been thinking for some time of getting some drums. I had enough experience sitting at my best friend's drum kit, as a teen, to have developed at least the smallest amount of ability, as well as really enjoying it. So through the years I have played my LP Conga and played on various surfaces at home with a pair of drum sticks... thinking about eventually buying a kit.

    I recently, finally did decide to start by buying a good snare drum. I bought a Ludwig Legacy Maple Snare. Now I want to be able to practice at home. I see that there are quite a few quieting drum heads that you install or pads that you place on top of the regular drum head, to bring down the volume of the drum so that the neighbors are not getting disturbed. I don't need to worry about having to keep switching between quiet heads and regular heads. I will, for now, just need to be playing at home. So if the answer is heads that are installed I intend to just leave them on long term... for now.

    I have been watching various videos, and that is helpful. But I would also be interested in any input about this subject, from any other guitar player / drummers here .

    Specifically what are the best options for bringing down the volume, while getting the best feel and tone possible, given the situation ?

    Also... any suggestions on a good drum forum to check out ?

    Thanks !
     
    Bluedano1 likes this.
  2. Kenny Blue

    Kenny Blue Silver Supporting Member

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    The RTOM Black Hole mesh snap on heads look interesting ...
     
  3. Bluedano1

    Bluedano1 Member

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    Two tricks from a few very good tasty drummers I play with, who really know how to play ( say, R&R/blues/Country/Jazz) quietly.
    1) use brushes especially ones whose butt ends are wood, like a drumstick, as you can switch up, play either end
    2) place your wallet on your snare drum head- different places on head produce different tones
     
  4. feet

    feet Supporting Member

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    I haven't looked in a long while, but you can't really change the sound without changing the feel. That's kinda the point. I used to do the foam pads over all the heads and it cut the sound to a very dull thud but it felt like swatting pillows.

    So it depends on how you play and what you're trying to achieve. The more you dull the head, the less responsive it is. So it isn't going to give the same amount of rebound and such. But if you're just going to hang away at rudiments while using yourself to play, it shouldn't be a big deal. There will be a mild adjustment when you finally play on real heads, is all. If anything, it'll be easier to play real ones after learning on fake ones.

    The ones I used to use were essentially mousepads; a slightly thicker neoprene. So if you have one lying around, give that a shot. You'll get a little more noise since it isn't covering the whole thing but that might be enough to keep it a little fun for you. Maybe a thin towel under it to keep the volume down.

    And from there you can decide what you want to do next. Softer materials will be duller and harder ones will provide more bounce.
     
  5. Kenny Blue

    Kenny Blue Silver Supporting Member

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    Cool... Thank you. I have been trying things, similar to those you suggest.

    Yeah I figured that with any of the options available both the sound and feel will be affected.
    But I notice on reviews and video comparisons that there ARE differences between what is available.

    I have been looking at the RTOM Black Hole snap on pads... They seem to let through, at least, some bit of the drum tone, and they address the rim noise issue as well.
     

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