snare sounds distant. why?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by thesedaze, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. thesedaze

    thesedaze Member

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    This isn't my mix, as I don't have more than 2 channels to work with currently, but I'm looking to get into recording drums w/ a bigger setup. This is a local band I found on Myspace who have a demo track online. The snare sounds distant in the mix, and I'm wondering why it would sound that way?

    Low in the mix? phase issues/mic bleed? lack of compression or pre?

    http://www.myspace.com/ojodeagua

    thanks!
     
  2. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    It doesn't really sound distant to me. It does seem to be tuned fairly high. Not a bad thing if that's the sound the drummer likes. Tuned lower and it might fatten up, if that's what you mean.
     
  3. thesedaze

    thesedaze Member

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    It just seems like it's a 'live' recording more than a close mic'd studio recording.
     
  4. alphadynamic

    alphadynamic Member

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    I agree with the above posts, the snare level is fine, but its tuned quite high, and lacks balls, I would hazzard a guess that only the top skin has been mic'd....
    I think there is more of a problem with the kick, its totally lost in the mix...
    The track has been recorded with little in the way of dynamic proccesing, which, without being unkind to the band, they kinda' need to smooth things out (especially the vocals.)
     
  5. thesedaze

    thesedaze Member

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    ahh. So are snares typically mic'd on bottom and top? Being a guitarist, it makes sense that double mic'ing a source would make it appear bigger in a track...I do it w/ my modest setup all the time on my guitar cab.
     
  6. alphadynamic

    alphadynamic Member

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    yes, but I would recommend using a pre-amp or console with a phase switch, I mix a little of the bottom snare skin in if i need more crunch, or to add more top end. If you add high freq. to the top skin you more often than not also bring out more hi-hat. spill.
     
  7. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    >>ahh. So are snares typically mic'd on bottom and top?<<

    Everyone has their own method of miking a snare. I don't do it, and I think I'm purty darn good at what I do.

    Just my two cents about wonderful me. ;)
     
  8. bbocaner

    bbocaner Member

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    sounds like it could use a little sculpting with a good eq
     
  9. elambo

    elambo Member

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    I don't know if "distant" is the best word, but I think I hear what you're referring to and I think there are two problems with it: room sound and lack of high end. Maybe the room noise of the snare was added artificially with reverb, maybe there were ROOM mics recorded that ended up too loud or maybe reverb was added in the mix. Either way, although it's short, I hear room. And there's not a good amount of high end, which would make sense if the snare mic was too far away. Or maybe it was eq'd that way. Old worn out skins tend to sound that way also.

    Anyway, two main ways to intentionally create distance in a mix are by adding a little reverb or by attenuating the high end. I hear both which could certainly explain (among some other possibilities listed above) what you hear.
     
  10. elambo

    elambo Member

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    I don't either. A well-placed, well-choosen top mic rarely needs more help in my book.
     
  11. bbocaner

    bbocaner Member

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    I like to place a mic under the drum stool, pointing halfway between the kick drum batter head and the bottom of the snare. depending on how you eq it, it can be used to rescue a snare that needs a little more crack or it can be used to add a little definition to the kick. You don't *need* to use it, but it can come in handy!
     
  12. elambo

    elambo Member

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    Under the drum stool? It'll take an unusually nimble drummer not to trip over that mic stand. It's bad enough with the 11 other mics.

    Even though that seems really odd, I'll try it anyway to see what sound that mic provides. I can just imagine what Kenny Aronoff would say when he saw that mic directly below his a$$. And I can imagine the look on my engineer's face when I keep asking him to adjust THAT mic.
     

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