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So 1970s era Ritchie Blackmore was a S.O.B to work with ?

Pablomago

Member
Messages
6,203
I saw them in '68 at a festival with Canned Heat, Creedence, Procol Harem among others. "Hush" was a hit. I rather liked them. I know nothing about how he treated his bandmates.
 

Rockledge

Member
Messages
5,557
In case you weren't aware, alcohol IS a drug, and one of the most dangerous. How many people have been killed by a driver stoned on weed vs. drunken drivers?
Indeed. Take it from an alcohol junkie who kicked the habit decades ago and went through two weeks or horrid withdrawals.
Alcohol is nothing but liquid heroin, the only difference is that alcohol is available without a prescription and the withdrawals are more deadly.
It amazes me how many people think that because alcohol and tobacco are legal that means they are not dangerous drugs, both are psychoactive drugs and both are highly addictive and do serious damage to human bodies and minds.

I doubt many people at all are killed by pot smokers on the road , although I don't condone using any drug while driving ( including a great deal of the dope doctors prescribe) but the worst most pot smokers do when driving is drive too slow.
I'd a hell of a lot rather be in a car with a driver who toked up a little than in a car with someone on those energy drinks ( which turn drivers into nutcases) or alcohol. Or under the influence of a cell phone.
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
4,904
I saw them in '68 at a festival with Canned Heat, Creedence, Procol Harem among others. "Hush" was a hit. I rather liked them. I know nothing about how he treated his bandmates.
Although they were very successful, RB didn't care for the musical direction of Rod Evans (the singer) and Jon Lord, perhaps didn't like Evans (or anyone....?) personally, and got Evans canned. They then emarked on the 5th based simpler sound that commercially was very popular. But I always preferred the music of the earlier Evans band, much more interesting and melodic, at least for me.

Some extra nonsense from RB- I remember a mid 70s GP interview where he claimed Marshall 'boosted' his amps (maybe true), and that at the end of each tour he'd have to replace all the speakers "because the extra power had melted them" (actually likely enough voltage to give you a nasty shock, but to melt metal..? )
 
Messages
735
Indeed. Take it from an alcohol junkie who kicked the habit decades ago and went through two weeks or horrid withdrawals.
Alcohol is nothing but liquid heroin, the only difference is that alcohol is available without a prescription and the withdrawals are more deadly.
It amazes me how many people think that because alcohol and tobacco are legal that means they are not dangerous drugs, both are psychoactive drugs and both are highly addictive and do serious damage to human bodies and minds.

I doubt many people at all are killed by pot smokers on the road , although I don't condone using any drug while driving ( including a great deal of the dope doctors prescribe) but the worst most pot smokers do when driving is drive too slow.
I'd a hell of a lot rather be in a car with a driver who toked up a little than in a car with someone on those energy drinks ( which turn drivers into nutcases) or alcohol. Or under the influence of a cell phone.
Thanks for your thoughts. I have severe Emphysema from smoking cigarettes, which will eventually kill me, and I kept smoking even after I knew that I had the disease because I was too addicted to quit. I needed an intervention, but because alcohol and tobacco are legal, they don't get the same attention as illicit drugs. These two are the MOST dangerous and deadly of all drugs. Everyone is concerned about opiates, which kill 30,000 Americans every year (and is tragic), but tobacco kills 300,000 each year, ten times as many, but no one cares because it's legal. The two legal drugs are the two MOST lethal ones. The effects of these two legal substances also put a huge strain on our healthcare system, helping the people whose lives are destroyed by them.
 

Whiskeyrebel

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
30,065
Although they were very successful, RB didn't care for the musical direction of Rod Evans (the singer) and Jon Lord, perhaps didn't like Evans (or anyone....?) personally, and got Evans canned. They then emarked on the 5th based simpler sound that commercially was very popular. But I always preferred the music of the earlier Evans band, much more interesting and melodic, at least for me.

Some extra nonsense from RB- I remember a mid 70s GP interview where he claimed Marshall 'boosted' his amps (maybe true), and that at the end of each tour he'd have to replace all the speakers "because the extra power had melted them" (actually likely enough voltage to give you a nasty shock, but to melt metal..? )
It wouldn't have to. It could just melt the glue holding the voice coil on the former, or ruin the insulation on the magnet wire and cause turns to short together.
 

Rockledge

Member
Messages
5,557
Thanks for your thoughts. I have severe Emphysema from smoking cigarettes, which will eventually kill me, and I kept smoking even after I knew that I had the disease because I was too addicted to quit. I needed an intervention, but because alcohol and tobacco are legal, they don't get the same attention as illicit drugs. These two are the MOST dangerous and deadly of all drugs. Everyone is concerned about opiates, which kill 30,000 Americans every year (and is tragic), but tobacco kills 300,000 each year, ten times as many, but no one cares because it's legal. The two legal drugs are the two MOST lethal ones. The effects of these two legal substances also put a huge strain on our healthcare system, helping the people whose lives are destroyed by them.
Indeed. Alcohol is just a liquid opiate, has the same effects on the central nervous system and far worse than opiates on internal organs.
No kidding, my dad was a 2-3 case of beer a day guy. He made a lot of money but we lived in poverty because of his addiction. He only wieghed about 140 lbs at his biggest, I was bigger than him when I was 15. He died at 52, when I was 15 or 16 of throat cancer, which is another side effect of alcohol, the medical profession determined years ago that mouth and throat cancers are caused by alcohol consumption. Something that isn't made an issue of, which baffles me.
I have a half brother who is his spittin image who was also a 3 case a day guy. Both of them functioned perfectly normally, my dad drank at work all night long and got away with it.
My brother retired from the air force, and he too is a little guy. Fortunately he quit about 15 years ago ( he is in his 70s now). He retired from the air force and was the dude that maintained the jet engines in jets. He functioned perfectly normally for years being hooked that bad.
 

SSS

Member
Messages
54

I think this is one of Richie's greatest solos, it really shows what he is capable of and blows me away every time I watch it. The way he is constantly adjusting the controls on the guitar while he plays a blazing solo is pretty impressive to me. I like his soloing on Wasted Sunset as well. I think a lot of the extended solos he did live with both DP and Rainbow became a bit boring after a while, for Richie as well as the listener. When he was genuinely inspired to play is when he came up with the magic.

There hasn't been a lot said about Richie's rhythm playing, particularly in DP, which is surprising because it is pretty unique. A lot of times he seemed to be just filling holes rather than playing a riff.
 

Gig Young

The Diana Nyad of Guitar
Platinum Supporting Member
Gold Supporting Member
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4,941
Medieval Ritchie:

"Don't crossbow me bro! Don't crossbow me!"


.
 

Defendant

Member
Messages
6,240
Make no mistake - I am the Henry Kissinger of TGP and I could have us all playing Kum Ba Ya together but I still haven't formally finalized a comprehensive plan to mitigate the ensuing inevitable disagreement that will errupt concerning which key the song should be played in!
I wish you well. Please leave out the part of the plan where you carpet-bomb Cambodia.

I think whoever blew your mind when you were 14 years old (approximately) will always be the guy that blew your mind the most.

I was 14 years old in 1984. I heard Yngwie for the first time. Mind. Blown. I'm 46 today.

I certainly love a ton of other guitar players. I don't sit around listening to Yngwie like I did when I was 14. But chances are great that nobody will affect me like than the guitar like he did in 1984.

Ritchie was big in 1974. So I'd guess a lot of the Ritchie fans are around 56 years old.

(There will be exceptions of course. Or maybe my theory is bad... It's based on a sample size of 1.)
I like this theory. I barely heard Ritchie as a teenager in the 80s. Or Page for that matter.

And as a teenager, what I heard didn’t impress me compared to what was around at the time.

Took a few years for me to see how great players like Ritchie and Jimmy were. And even though I became a massive fan of nearly every 70s guitar player, there was never that ‘holy ****’ impact the 80s guys had on me.

Now Blackers did have/has/will have always a chip on his shoulders. No more no less. Leave it at that and close thread. It's nothing to lose sleep over and get worked up at.
Your actions suggest to me that closing this thread may deprive you of an important outlet.
 
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Defendant

Member
Messages
6,240
Personally I enjoy Ritchie’s sense of humour in interviews, though I find him to be quite bitchy about other players.

Like TGP-level bitchy.

It seems to me he always had that streak, and the near-instant transition from hotshot to stumblebum he and many others of his generation experienced in 1978 exacerbated matters.

Yng turning up in full Blackmore drag a few years later really rubbed it in.

As others have thoroughly covered by now, clearly on an interpersonal level he’s a wee bit of a challenge. I’d avoid.

But what a big, woody, beautiful tone, and what a band. Purple was a real sum of the parts act in which Ritchie supplied fire, flair and no small amount of unpredictability.
 

wetordry

Member
Messages
4,559
I get a chuckle out of blackmore's dry humor and his acceptance that he can be impossible to work with.
Love the playing, the technique, the style.
Maybe he was difficult in the 70's, and an s.o.b.
So what? He stacked up alot of work, alot of miles, promoted alot of relatively unknown talents. Execs must have thought he could get the job done.
 

mikeratan00

Supporting Member
Messages
4,612
I was backstage ( sound check ) on their Asian tour with frontman JLT. I think 1991.
Friend was one of the promoters and warned us not to take any pics of RB.

We didn’t bother him and he pretty much doing his thing w/ no interaction with anyone expect his GF ( now wife ?)

I was just awestruck with 3 all white Marshall stacks, 2 white 70’s strat and the glorious sound from the Taurus floorpedal
 

kmoed

Member
Messages
75
Enjoyed reading through this entire thread. Love him or hate him, he gets people talking.

I am personally a huge Blackmore fan. I love everything he has done. I was lucky enough to see DP on the perfect stranger's tour way back when and went to see Blackmore's Knight in Pennsylvania 2 years back.

Small venue, Blackmore was all smiles, handing out beers to people in the audience, making jokes, A few people approached the stage with albums, one person with a Strat. He signed everything between songs. I've never seen any artist do that. He seemed genuinely happy to be doing what he was doing. The concert was fantastic.

He's obviously a very private person who has little use for his celebrity status. I am happy just listening to the music he makes.
 

vortexxxx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,125
I think a lot of the weird stuff Ritchie says in interviews is a put on. He was always pulling pranks with the band. I recall an interview where he was asked why he smashes a guitar on stage. His answer was something like - sometimes they (the guitars) need to be taught a lesson.
 

vortexxxx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,125
I think he has a very dry, English sense of humour which doesn't translate in the US.
Ritchie used to put pages from bestiality magazines inside flight magazines while flying. He has a twisted sense of humor but many people may not understand and often he says things with a straight face that are put-ons, and people don't always get that. I do that too (not the magazine thing though), and people think I'm serious, which has gotten me in hot water in the past.
 




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