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So 1970s era Ritchie Blackmore was a S.O.B to work with ?

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
6,340
If they'd treated the people who appreciated their music like garbage?
No.
No they would not.
Once again: 2nd and 3rd hand stories from 45 years ago are hardly definitive evidence of anything

I see enough questionable interpretation of direct interactions which occured the same day to know how absurd it would be to draw conclusions from decades old gossip as it is subject to multiple layers of possible misinterpretation at best.
 

msmith40

Member
Messages
37
You make it sound as if I haven't spoken to these people since 1976.
These are not 'interpretations'.
This is not decades old 'gossip'.
I can reach-out to any of them on social media and simply say: 'Ritchie Blackmore'.
The response will be "THAT F**KING PRICK!!!!"

Those same friends will go on and on about how nice Ronnie Dio was.
Are those stories - from 45 years ago - to be ignored as gossip and interpretations?

One of my buds was a huge fan of Terry Kath.
He had a Terry Kath t-shirt that he'd silkscreened himself, as Terry Kath t-shirts were unavailable.
As a big F**K YOU! to Ritchie, he put it on, went up to Ritchie and asked him to sign it.
He did.

And really, you make it sound as if there are no other stories of Ritchie being a complete ass anywhere to be found.
As if there's zero evidence of Ritchie EVER being a hard-on towards anyone.

Bottom line:
I'm not the same person I was in 1976.
Here's hoping likewise for Ritchie.
 

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
6,340
Sorry but some guy who tells a story to some other guy about something that happened 45 years ago...all that's doing is putting some random interactions with a guy neither of you really knows well through 2 layers of interpretation plus 45 years to boot.

Yes I'd call that gossip (possibly worse) and the Terry Kath story you just described sounds childish. I wouldn't take that person's interpretation of events seriously.
 

Bokar

Member
Messages
133
Reading Ian Gillan autobiography Ritchie does come off as a interesting charachter...

Probably the best bit was how he, when Roger Glover started having serious medical issues during early days of mk2 Purple(strong stomsch pain, nausea, doctors couldn't find anything wrong with him), suggested should Roger die that he should die on stage and that they should cremate him as part of the show :D
 

Friedmett

Member
Messages
79
Looked staged to me
The truth is Ritchie had his demands on how things should be and the sacking of Glover was to fresh members into the band. Coverdale and Hughes got into funky stuff and drugs mostly Glen though. As for the Cali Jam due to how festivals were run Blackmore was not really interested so gave his demands to get rid of it and ok you got it. When the day came it ran not late but early. would you please go on? No said Ritchie and stuck to the agreed time to go on. Finally DP goes to the stage and the camera man to the right does get to close for Ritchies stunt at the end. Sure it was staged but too much petrol in the amps.
 
Messages
2,300
The truth is Ritchie had his demands on how things should be and the sacking of Glover was to fresh members into the band. Coverdale and Hughes got into funky stuff and drugs mostly Glen though. As for the Cali Jam due to how festivals were run Blackmore was not really interested so gave his demands to get rid of it and ok you got it. When the day came it ran not late but early. would you please go on? No said Ritchie and stuck to the agreed time to go on. Finally DP goes to the stage and the camera man to the right does get to close for Ritchies stunt at the end. Sure it was staged but too much petrol in the amps.
Yeah...the amp explosion was staged. I think the smashing of the camera wasn't.
 

Friedmett

Member
Messages
79
I've read that the tube socket arcing is a bad issue with Majors, but that failure would not create a huge fireball. I've seen amps blow up from such a failure, and the worst case caused a bit of arcing and sparks, but no fireball. The term "blow up" can be somewhat subjective. But that is great info from Dawk, thanks for the post. And I'd love to see what he did to fix the amp not accepting distortion pedals; if that was indeed the case with a stock Major, then Marshall seriously dropped the ball in the Major design. The ultralinear output stage shouldn't have anything to do with it.
It's the fly-back with the output transformer.

Booster or distortion takes the 650 volts of b+ and jumps it to 1,800 (prv) volts. That will arch over to the closest ground and Bam! Yes around the power tube sockets and OT between the primary and secondary windings burn.
Also the wiring between the sockets.

So in a sense it is blowing up per say. Sometimes they would then catch fire!
Being a former Marshall Major 1971 owner I can say that the output is very clean even on 10! So in order to drive anything like a Fuzz face I used a Carl Martin hot drive boost mkII and at first it had 6550 tubes + small burned out fan over them which did not accept Danish voltage 220. I was running the Master Volume low with a Marshall powerbrake to begin with and while it sounded good I did get the fuse to blow 2 times. Once in rehearsel and once live which was captured on film. Time for the solo and the amp cuts out.

During the brake from bands I got NOS GE KT88 tubes and a big fan installed above them inspired by the small one I took out. No more fuses to blow and by the time I went with playing Jimi Hendrix the volume was on 10 with the powerbrake and it was good though very mild crunch.

This lasted about 2 years maybe 3 and then the tubes did melt from their sockets. After a while the tubes got replaced and the amp sold on still playing good
 

Guitarist64

Member
Messages
165
Bitchy Blackmore...yeah, I read the same thing years ago. His response was that when he thought people were expecting him to be like that, he would be charming. Who knows?
 

toasterdude

Member
Messages
1,936
I believe he felt sadness on Jon Lord's passing, but he had mentioned they only had dinner a few times since Blackmore left DP.

Blackmore lives on Long Island or New Hampshire, and BN plays mostly in Europe, primarily in Germany, I believe.

I believe once JL retired he was living in GB.
Back in the 80s he lived in ct but apparently took the ferry to long island some times. He used to hang out at a club up in huntington called sparks.

One night I played there and after our set people said blackmore was hanging at the bar. Not sure I would have recognized him and am positive he would not have been impressed by us!
 
Messages
1
I was thinking about this thread and wondered quite honestly if Blackmore suffers from bipolar disorder. I'm just speculating. Being the father of a bipolar daughter, I'm well familiar with the extreme mood swings and meltdowns that can occur with people who are stricken with this mental disorder. I think bipolar disease is quite common among people who are artistically inclined.
I am more inclined to believe that Ritchie Blackmore has Asperger's. He doesn't do chit chat, has meltdowns, doesn't like bright light, is socially awkward, has special interests, and is sometimes labeled an "oddball" or weird. He doesn't fit in. Same for me. I can see many autistic traits in him. Also, he doesn't like looking people in the eyes. I think that's why he is so often misunderstood by people.
 

vortexxxx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,125
I am more inclined to believe that Ritchie Blackmore has Asperger's. He doesn't do chit chat, has meltdowns, doesn't like bright light, is socially awkward, has special interests, and is sometimes labeled an "oddball" or weird. He doesn't fit in. Same for me. I can see many autistic traits in him. Also, he doesn't like looking people in the eyes. I think that's why he is so often misunderstood by people.
When you see his face on California Jam, it does look like he has something. I've seen similar expressions on some autistic people. I didnt notice it though when I saw them during the Perfect Strangers tour, but at the time i wouldn't have recognized the look anyway.
 

dazar

Member
Messages
252
I believe he felt sadness on Jon Lord's passing, but he had mentioned they only had dinner a few times since Blackmore left DP.

Blackmore lives on Long Island or New Hampshire, and BN plays mostly in Europe, primarily in Germany, I believe.

I believe once JL retired he was living in GB.
I'm pretty sure Blackmore doesn't live in NH. You might be thinking about Rod Price of Foghat, who did live in the northern part of NH until his death.
 

mos6507

Member
Messages
149
I haven't read through all these pages but I can say that based on recent interviews (and that live stream he did during the COVID lockdowns) the guy seems to have mellowed quite a bit with age and probably through the influence of Candice who sort of acts like a leash on him. That mellowing, of course, also extends to his playing slowing down so maybe it's a double-edged sword.

I don't think he has aspergers although I can understand why some people might think he does. He's an introverted, dark, brooding, control-freak kind of guy where his idea of connecting with others is to say insensitive ballbusting things or pull damaging jackass style stunts. None of that really matters too much to the listener directly but it does for band's ability to stay together for any length of time. That's why Ritchie can't play with anyone other than his wife and no-name hired guns and the remnants of Mark II have stayed with its current lineup for ages.
 
Messages
203
I saw them on their Perfect Strangers tour. To be honest I didn't have real high expectations for the show...it was late in their career and it had been forever since they had anything close to a hit song getting airplay. But tell you what, they blew me away. Absolutely mesmerizing concert and the wall of fat, dense, rich, musical power that rolled off that stage into the audience was something I'll never forget. It was the complete, original lineup: Ian Gillan, Paice, John Lord, (forget the bassist but it was the original dude) etc. They were tight, they were in perfect tune, they were in complete command of each and every song. The pacing of the show was spot-on and they all gave 100%. No resting on their laurels here. The crowd roared after every song in appreciation for what they were seeing and hearing and the band fed off the energy.

The funny thing was that Blackmore was the least impressive guy on the stage. He was great, don't get me wrong, but Ian Gillan gave the best vocal performance I have ever heard in my life. Dude sang his ass off and hit EVERY note. John Lord was badass as well and his freakin' Hammond through a Leslie tone was killer...he was rocking that big piece of furniture back and forth and just nailing his solos. Blackmore did his "smash it up" schtick, which came off as staged, juvenile and unnecessary (I did get a tremolo spring that flew into the crowd). One of the best shows I've ever seen. Go figure, huh?

Anyway, that's my Deep Purple story.
I saw that tour also. 1985, IIRC. Portland Memorial Colosseum. I have to confess that, although I'd been a Purple fan since 1972, this was the first time I'd actually seen the band in concert. I concur with your review - Gillan and Lord stole the show while Ritchie just seemed to be phoning it in.

My favorite track from the record, BTW...

 




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