So about this new pick grip...

AZJim

Member
Messages
271
Another old guy here, “fixing” his incorrect grip after decades of playing, wrong. Of course, I can’t play fast and accurately, so I’m all for retraining my right hand to be right. But help me:

If I understand, the “right” grip is with the side of the index finger, forming sort of a loose fist, and opposing of course with the flesh of the thumb, right? Minimal pick actually sticking out...

This feels to me analogous to writing while holding the pen sticking out the bottom of a closed fist, like a 2 year old might try. This gives you far less control and ability to make fine detail. With more fingertip, one can control the pen better.

Same with guitar pick: more (index) fingertip, more a feeling of control, detail. Side of index finger: more of a “gross” approach, lacking in subtlety, and accuracy.

Please talk me out of it, I know I’m wrong.
wlEmoticon-winkingsmile%5B1%5D.png
;)
 

TCMx3

Member
Messages
2,504
"right" and "wrong" might be a little strong for pick grip.

but, your feeling of clumsiness has to do with fighting against muscle memory, not the actual relative accuracy of pick grips.

watching video of guys who can pick turbo speed, my observation is that most of them have a lot of arm movement (typically rotational) and this make sense to me. I played counterstrike for years and we all played with super low sensitivity and huge arm movements. I can only remember a small handful of players that were ever able to play at a professional level with sensitivities that would have involved their fingers or wrists.
 

AZJim

Member
Messages
271
Good, thanks, this is the kind of insight I'm looking for. Couple questions though, when you say "a lot of arm movement" and "rotational" are you meaning the (forearm) twisting motion? Or...more like the arm going up and down from the elbow, like the hands of a clock, with no twisting and very little if any wrist movement, either lateral or vertical?

And how are you using "counterstrike," never heard that term?

But this is a good start...anyone else out there?
 
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TCMx3

Member
Messages
2,504
Good, thanks, this is the kind of insight I'm looking for. Couple questions though, when you say "a lot of arm movement" and "rotational" are you meaning the (forearm) twisting motion? Or...more like the arm going up and down from the elbow, like the hands of a clock, with no twisting and very little if any wrist movement, either lateral or vertical?

And how are you using "counterstrike," never heard that term?

But this is a good start...anyone else out there?

rotation of forearm.

counterstrike is a first person competitive video game. I was referring to mouse sensitivity, or how much you have to move your physical mouse to move the camera and aim the weapons in the game. CS players are notorious for using very low sensitivities as high level play typically results in people being in front of you.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
25,186
There are as many idiosyncratic picking techniques as there are great stylists. If I wanted to find 'perfect' technique I woulda played English Horn or something. Ratzo could play with his chin...and tell a joke at the same time. I'm glad he didn't give a hoot.
 

AZJim

Member
Messages
271
I just posted this into this forum because I think it answers a lot of questions about picking technique and how effective simple and 'normal' it can be. Exceptional camera angle.
https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?threads/normal-perfect-picking.1782149/

Wow, ok this is awesome, a great resource. But couple of questions: this gentleman seems to focus 90+% of his picking motion only in the (mostly lateral) movement of his wrist, and to a small extent, the thumb/index combo. That is, his forearm NEVER moves, it's completely planted on the guitar's top, no motion at all until the wrist.

This seems counter to what others have said about some of the shred guys, that there's a lot of ARM motion, implying a fixed wrist. Is this just a matter of different strokes, literally? And each can work as well, it's just up to the player to see what fits for them?

I wonder, if we looked at all the fast pickers of any style, what would be the most prevalent, in very broad terms:

a) fixed forearm, all movement at wrist/thumb/index, or
b) wrist/thumb/index completely locked, and all movement from forearm, either rotational, or up/down, or a combination.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
38,086
That is, his forearm NEVER moves, it's completely planted on the guitar's top, no motion at all until the wrist.
The motion is very economical and efficient, only what is required to do the job. You can see him hit chords just before the 2 min. spot. Then the arm moves more.

There have been threads here advocating non standard pick technique using examples like EVH (holds it in 2 fingers) Benson (funny wrist angle) Santana (giant pick) Metheny (squeeze the pick into shape) using super thick picks (2mm+) using ultra tiny picks etc etc.

Although it is a YMMV world, for most of us, sticking to convention and developing technique based on sound basics will work. This vid shows how easy:D it can be... once you get there.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
25,186
The motion is very economical and efficient, only what is required to do the job. You can see him hit chords just before the 2 min. spot. Then the arm moves more.

There have been threads here advocating non standard pick technique using examples like EVH (holds it in 2 fingers) Benson (funny wrist angle) Santana (giant pick) Metheny (squeeze the pick into shape) using super thick picks (2mm+) using ultra tiny picks etc etc.

Although it is a YMMV world, for most of us, sticking to convention and developing technique based on sound basics will work. This vid shows how easy:D it can be... once you get there.
He has fantastic Telecaster technique.
 

skisquash

Member
Messages
423
One more quick one for your opinions: holding pick, tight, or loose?
Yes...Both.

It's all about the tone, attack, feel and what I'm playing. I sometimes even slightly 'roll' the pick based on where and how I'm hitting the strings. FWIW, for this reason I dislike the picks with extra sandpaper-like grip. I like a little but not so much that I feels like my fingers are glued to the pick.
 




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