So I guess Mesa Nomads suck?

LesPaulMan

Member
Messages
711
While I never cared for the Nomad 45 or 55, I thought the 100 was a great sounding amp. The EQ made all the difference. Set it to a slight V shape, use good quality 6L6's (didn't care for EL34's in this amp), and make sure you got some Black Shadow MC-90's hooked up.

The early problems with the Nomads breaking down was due to the volume/tone knobs being the wrong size. This allowed the pot shaft to be pushed in, basically causing an intermittent contact due to the pot's casing being un-crimped. This was a known problem and Mesa's fix was to send out a plastic washer to fit between the knob and the pot. Sometimes the pot could be re-crimped, other times it would have to be replaced.

If you can find a Nomad at a decent price (especially the 100 watter) I wouldn't be that afraid to buy it.
 

primerib

Member
Messages
42
yeah hbar, I had a Nomad 55 for a while. just couldn't get it to sound great for anything. it had this inherent mid spike, but not in a good sense. I couldn't dial it out, it was almost nasal sounding. the cleans weren't as good as some Mesa's either. IMO, avoid at all cost unless they are nearly giving it away.
 

primerib

Member
Messages
42
While I never cared for the Nomad 45 or 55, I thought the 100 was a great sounding amp. The EQ made all the difference. Set it to a slight V shape, use good quality 6L6's (didn't care for EL34's in this amp), and make sure you got some Black Shadow MC-90's hooked up.

The early problems with the Nomads breaking down was due to the volume/tone knobs being the wrong size. This allowed the pot shaft to be pushed in, basically causing an intermittent contact due to the pot's casing being un-crimped. This was a known problem and Mesa's fix was to send out a plastic washer to fit between the knob and the pot. Sometimes the pot could be re-crimped, other times it would have to be replaced.

If you can find a Nomad at a decent price (especially the 100 watter) I wouldn't be that afraid to buy it.

Good point. I had always wondered about the addition of the EQ on the 100 watt head and its ability to dial in better. I'm glad to hear that you found it a suitable amp that way.
 

LesPaulMan

Member
Messages
711
Good point. I had always wondered about the addition of the EQ on the 100 watt head and its ability to dial in better. I'm glad to hear that you found it a suitable amp that way.

Not only did I find the 100 watter suitable, it really is a killer amp. I will agree with others though. The lack of a graphic eq on the 45/55 really kills the sound. The Nomads have WAY TOO MUCH MIDRANGE. You have to scoop them to get back to where it should be. I will say that a decent graphic eq in the effects loop greatly helps the 45/55 models.
 

timmers

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
729
I produced/engineered a demo for a math-rock buddy of mine a couple of years ago. He had a Nomad 55 head & a Mesa 2x12 cab. We ended up using it for all the guitars, & it came out sounding pretty decent. Have a listen here.

Kind of a ridiculous tune, but it shows off the versatility (if you can call it that) of the Nomad's many, many knobs & switches. It took us freaking forever to dial it in to each of those sounds, though, and it the thing ended up breaking on him right after the sessions & needed $300 worth of work to resurrect it.

Too many options, was my basic opinion. But when it was eventually cranking, it sounded pretty righteous.
 

LocustXReign

Member
Messages
1,751
I got one as my first real tube amp as well. It broke all the time, was muddy sounding and didnt really get a good tone on any channel.

I did sell it for $850(w a flight case though)
 

Finaldo

Member
Messages
160
I had a Nomad 100 head and played it through a Recto 2x12 cab. I thought the clean channel sounded pretty dull, and the distortion lacking in clarity and pretty mushy.

I sold the head and kept the cab... The head actually got demolished by UPS during shipping. :(
 

Red Planet

Member
Messages
4,347
I owned a Nomad 55 1x12 Combo. It wasnt a bad amp. The Clean sound wasnt as good as I would have liked. Everything else on it sounded good. The Reverb had a mind of its own. Somtimes it would work and sometimes it wouldnt (probably just a small problem).

That being said I much prefer the Mark III's and DC-5's to any Boogie out there.

I am a currently the owner of a Mark III Blue Stripe Combo (w/ EV, GEQ, Simulcalss, and Reverb). Though I should say just got it, it's in the shop for a checkup and the Reverb isnt working.

So far Im loving the sound of it. The Clean Sound is very good. The Amp is just a smidge bright but maybe a Speaker and Tweaking will do the trick.
 

edward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,582
I have a pair of Mavericks (4x10 and a head), and a DC-5 combo. I'd LOVE a DC-5 head, but they are pretty tough to come by. I'll definitely stay away from this amp. Thanks.

Easy solution: get a widebody head chassis. They come up every blue moon on ebay (I think I saw 2 come up in maybe the last year), get one new from Mesa, or have one made by the myriad of cab makers out there. The DC5 is awesome, and I "used" to have an itch to put it into a head cab. Now I have a MKIII head, and that solved the itch :)

Any of you Boogie heads care to comment on the Mark III blue stripe? I hear a lot about the VI's, and those DC's, but not much on the Mark III.

I've got a Simul greenie. Put it this way, the IIIs have a real cult following. Either you "get it" and are rabidly in love with it, or you hate it and wonder why there are so many fools out there with these abominations. FWIW, I really grown to love mine, and it has earned "keeper" status (when other amps have made their way out the door). Once you learn it, the versatility is astounding ...yeah, even despite the shared controls. The key is knowing how to dial it in, and you MUST get one with a GEQ. It covers huge tonal ground. It's OD is more "rude" (in the best way possible) than the smoother DC or MKIV. And the cleans are huge, round, and chimey up top; and with serious spanky-clean headroom (not surprisingly, more than the DC5) should you need that. I did, however, go through some tube changes to "get here" so keep that in mind. Hope this helps you a bit. :)

Edward
 

GtrWiz

Member
Messages
4,049
I love my Nomad 100, just as much as my Cameron Marshall, my '64 Deluxe, Matchless c-30, '66 Twin, and Diamond Phantom.

I do have el-34's in it, and messed with the preamp tubes quite a bit, but it's a keeper at this point.
 

John Hurtt

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
19,836
I've had a Nomad 55 for several years, and it has given me no trouble. Sounds great, very versatile and easy for me to dial in. But, it's a Boogie so if you don't like Boogies you won't like this.
 

oldrock

Member
Messages
266
Late but just for fyi to those that end up searching for info... I also have the nomad 55 combo and have had zero problems with mine. As for tone, I personally like the channel 2 with gain cranked up the best. Channel 3 just seems to get too muddy and channel 1 is not nearly as good as my traynor custom blues 50. I also have a mesa subway rocket and it is much easier to find good tones on than by nomad so you do have to work at it to find the sweet spot.
 

Headstock

Member
Messages
201
Well, its all clearer to me now. Only Mesa I have ever owned was a Nomad 45 combo. Never cared for it. Maybe I will have to give some of the others a glance.
 

Tommy_G

Member
Messages
2,839
My Nomad sounds pretty good. I've got a Heartbreaker, Formula Pre, and Studio Pre to compare it against, and it is currently my go-to amp.

Why there are so many complaints is amazing to me: Its got the exact same clean channel design as 80% of all boogies before and since.

Its Channel 2 is the identical sound as the Heartbreaker Lust Hi channel - also replicated elsewhere in MB's lineage (eg. a Marshall voiced Mk1 tone). Channel 3 at low gain rocks out with a beautiful Marshall tone - also wicked for blues. Channel 3 at low gain is very very rockin' sweet and makes this amp the top pick compared to my others.

The secret about making this amp sound good is in preamp tube selection...so many tubes are shared between very different sounds that if you don't pick them right, you may get good tone on one channel but not on the other two.

This is unlike the Heartbreaker where Love and Lust Channel use completely different tubes in the first two stages. A worse amp for this unfortunate and misconceived tube-sharing architecture is the Dual Rectifier Solo series.
 

jdh4him

Member
Messages
78
Nomad 100 1x12 combo owner...I've really liked this amp after swapping pre-amp and power tubes...Yes, you have to dial it in, but channel 1 "pushed' and Channel 2 "vintage" are 2 of the better sounding platforms I've heard in Mesa's. The graphic EQ (only on the 100) has everything to do with being able to dial the channels in.

EQ pedal needed in the effects loop if you play channel 1 on "clean/normal"...give the level a slight boost to keep up with channels 2 and 3 and you're good to go. Channel 1 also takes pedals really well, and channel 2 loves my Zendrive for smooth, sustaining lead lines.

Thought I'd chime in...
 

stratton

Member
Messages
1,010
I've had four Mesas: An original Mk1, a Nomad 45 combo, a 20/20 power amp, and a Trem-O-Verb head.

The Nomad 45 is simply not in the same class in any sense. Poor consrtruction and QC (after a couple of pots let go, I had to void the warranty by securing all the crimped pots or they would have come apart) and tone that just SUCKED X 3 channels.

It would be a crying shame to judge the rest of the Mesa line by this turd of an amp.

BTW, if you like yours, I'm happy for you. Really!
 




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