So is Bandcamp the solution?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by pold, Feb 1, 2018.

  1. pold

    pold Member

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    ok, but you can't deny that genuine artists today are not supported at all, in the past it was very difficult, but not impossible.
     
  2. thecornman

    thecornman Member

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    This is in no way a fact.
     
  3. nmiller

    nmiller Drowning in lap steels Gold Supporting Member

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    Yeah, nothing describes the world of music better than a black-and-white distinction between "genuine" artists who struggle in the gutter and non-genuine ones with corporate sponsorship. :messedup
     
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  4. pold

    pold Member

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    That's true, supply and demand can't be changed. So, it looks like it's all over for the musicians (unless the Universal Basic Income is introduced....:D).
     
  5. uab9253

    uab9253 Member

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    I agree there is so much home produced garbage out there right now, my own stuff included. I do wonder who will "curate" new music post-record industry and with the slow death of terrestrial radio.
     
  6. dirk_benedict

    dirk_benedict Supporting Member

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    There was always garbage. It's as easy as it always was to not listen to things that you don't like.
     
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  7. tiktok

    tiktok Supporting Member

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    You've been able to "record amazing things in your bedroom" for decades, but it's hard to find examples of professional grade recordings which become significantly monetizable that were produced in an actual bedroom with the equipment available to a non-professional.

    Living expenses: it's not just "important", it's vital. The time and energy eaten up by a day job all comes from the same pool needed to write, rehearse, perform and record. Trying to make this hypothetical professional recording in your bedroom while holding down a typically ****** day job means everything happens very slowly--just a few hours a day at most.

    Connecting the artists with services: let me clarify, by "connecting" I mean having ready access to professional grade services and then paying for them. Sure, with the internet I can email Greg Calbi to see if I can get him to master my home-produced tracks, but he's going to want to be paid a significant amount of money up front to do that. With a recording contract, the label just drops it into their schedule with him and the charges all go on the account. Leaving the artist more time to write, rehearse, perform, record and promote the work. Likewise: promotion agencies, tour management, arrangers, gear techs, etc. Labels, over the decades have built up a stable of professionals they use for all their projects and again, the bills go the label, not immediately to the artist. Everything is paid back from the artist royalties, but that's completely different from having a C.O.D. presented to you that you're personally responsible for, right away.

    Global marketing: no, this is not being replaced by the web. Are their truly viral breakouts with no professional intervention? Probably. Is that anything to rely upon, or the way that businesses actually run? No.

    Videos on the iPhone: Sure, it can be done. But, it isn't. I could write War and Peace on my iPhone, if I had no other option, but I'd be beaten to market by all the folks with computers and companies supporting them.

    Tour support: in the world where everyone's saying "THE MONEY IS IN TOURING!", it's more vital then ever. And again, self-funding tours is horrible. The bills have to be paid immediately, or the credit card explodes.
     
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  8. Dasein

    Dasein Member

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    Epic troll --- Malmsteen & Amos - together at last!
     
  9. Guitarworks

    Guitarworks Member

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    Band camp isn't the solution. The solution is that the recording industry needs to figure out a way to regain control of the content. Digitization makes single-channel marketing of content impossible.
     
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  10. Crazyquilt

    Crazyquilt Guitar Dad Silver Supporting Member

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    Digitization makes value based on scarcity well nigh impossible, which is a primary challenge for any medium whose product can be digitized, whether it's music, art, books or movies or games or ....
     
  11. Hugh_s

    Hugh_s Member

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    no it isn't.
     
  12. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Silver Supporting Member

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    It is if you have a nice flute
     
  13. taez555

    taez555 Member

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    Until we move to a Star Trek type society that does not use money, there is no solution.

    Much like the Pyramids of Giza, music of those years we all grew up in will be seen as an anachronism, financially impossible to replicate on anywhere near the same scale.

    The real issue isn't how will the musicians of the future make money. They won't.

    The question will be, how do fans access the music that was already created.

    Pretty soon you'll be paying the Google/Amazon/Facebook/whatever gatekeeper to rent ALL the music you once owned. (as if you most of you aren't already there)

    As the reigns tighten on illegal downloads, and the internet becomes more regulated, music you loved will be lost forever.
     
  14. tiktok

    tiktok Supporting Member

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    Well, music that you didn't buy might be "lost forever" (but probably not). Those thousands of CDs in my study aren't going anywhere. And the music that I'm renting access for from Apple? I suspect they'll still be happy to maintain that relationship forever.
     
  15. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    Piracy has dwindled significantly, as streaming has taken over. It did create the "music is free" problem, tho.

    You're going to have a hard time making a "Born To Run," "Innervisions," "Sgt. Pepper's" or what have you, in your bedroom working in your spare time.

    For all of it's faults, the old system was pretty good at separating the wheat from the chaff, and allowing serious artists the wherewithal to make really great records, and achieve levels of public awareness. The new paradigm, whatever that is, has failed to produce a single major artist, AFAIK.

    I don't know what the solution is, but decimating the industry, including all of the support people like producers, engineers, songwriters, etc. certainly doesn't seem like it's going to lead to better music being made.

    Miles Davis and Triumph is a good one, too. <g>
     
  16. supergenius365

    supergenius365 Silver Supporting Member

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  17. twoheadedboy

    twoheadedboy Member

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    In the case of films, people often don't pay for them unless they're paying to see them in a movie theater. In the case of games, they pay for them because game makers have done a good job with DRM and because in the case of online games, you usually need a legit copy of a game to access game servers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
  18. twoheadedboy

    twoheadedboy Member

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    What are you basing that claim on? From what I can see, piracy is still rampant. Whole countries of people pirate TV shows like Game of Thrones because HBO won't let them watch it unless they sign up for cable.
     
  19. Neenja

    Neenja Member

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    There are a ton of places to put your music where no one will listen. No reason to limit it to one.
     
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  20. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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