So many bedroom players threads...

twisty571

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
979
1st thing is I am a home player. I have always wondered is what is "bedroom" level? Is it midnight jamming at a low level? Do you consider that the average home player? Sure I am not getting my amps cranked, I can practice quietly but I don't most of the time. For the most part I am playing 2 amps in a wet/dry or stereo set up. I own my home and no little kids to worry about so I can play as loud or quiet as I want, I see a lot of people around here with 50 & 100w in their house playing them loud. Are they bedroom players?
 
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rickt

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,392
A fully cranked tone will have your pant legs flapping in the wind created by the speakers. One can actually feel what is being played.

At a "bedroom" level, one can approximate the tone, but the feeling will not be there. Not to say you can't get a really good low volume tone. It is just going to feel different.
 

Just Mike

Member
Messages
468
I'm going to guess that most of us here are bedroom or at home players only. If my guess is correct then a lot of "the best" amps just aren't. A practical at home amp doesn't need to be more than 10-15 watts. I'm in a gigging band so I can justify my 50w Marshall, but I don't play it at home. I have a Deluxe for my bedroom amp and it's still too loud.
Of course, there are some tonal characteristics of bigger amps that only they can get, but are we musicians or are we gear junkies?:bow
 

cai4651

Member
Messages
17
Well it depends on what you expect. Low volume tone with digital modelers or amps with line out will sound almost exactly to mic'ed amps. That is a great sound at low volume and of course you could easily make recordings with this.
But if you expect that kick that gives turning volume up, you will not get that of course .
It's like expecting that a 8k Tv(amp) will look great with 1080p signal( low Volume)
 

LaXu

Member
Messages
7,696
I'm going to guess that most of us here are bedroom or at home players only. If my guess is correct then a lot of "the best" amps just aren't. A practical at home amp doesn't need to be more than 10-15 watts. I'm in a gigging band so I can justify my 50w Marshall, but I don't play it at home. I have a Deluxe for my bedroom amp and it's still too loud.
I don't subscribe to this "amp must be X wattage" thing because people have so wildly different preferences. Best home tube amp I have ever had is my Bogner and it's a beefy 45W. It's power scalable down to 15W but sounds just best to me at 45W with the master volume turned down a bit more. While that extra power is not needed for volume, it does have an effect on the feel and sound.

People insisting on old non-master volume amp designs like the Deluxe Reverb will have a hard time without an attenuator.
 

gulliver

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,091
FYI ... loud home levels and medium to soft drummer levels overlap.

IMHO, the loudness of an amp is a separate thrill than the actual tone. If you want the thrill of loudness and you play with a medium to soft drummer, it can work, but the drummer will eventually hate you. :cool:
 

rawkguitarist

Member
Messages
11,119
The part that is missing from a "cranked amp sound" is the physical volume and speakers being hit nice and hard. Not even to speaker distortion. Just using the speakers with some volume sounds better. People just need to accept the laws of physics and know that there is no way to get the entire cranked amp tone without bothering your family, neighbors or damaging your hearing.

A small amp at home cranked still sounds like a small amp cranked. I play hours and hours through usually a Carol Ann 50 watt plexi. Tamed down to even family sleeping volume with pedals sounds way better to me than a small amp cranked. A bit more power and 2 speakers always sounds best to me. No matter the volume.
 

Valveampguy

Member
Messages
452
Bedroom level in terms of volume is such a relative term. If it means apartment building at midnight, meaning no sound audible beyond TV volume, then zero amp or attenuation will give a satisfactory result.
For this scenario I'm playing my Ox or an Iridium into good headphones.

For daytime use, I'm playing valve amps or a Fender ToneMaster attenuated to whatever I deem comfortable for my ears, living in a detached house, with only my super tolerant wife to consider. That's about 95 db max for my ears on a continued basis. That is enty loud for me and offers loads of options with attenuation.

If your maximum volume is TV or average radio volume during daytime, it's tough.
 




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