Solderless Speaker Connectors Any Good?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by NBlair930, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. NBlair930

    NBlair930 Silver Supporting Member

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    In hopes of "tasting" a few different speakers in a combo over the next few months, I thought that using a wiring harness made of 1/4" mono male on one end with 2 butt connectors (speaker crimps) on the other end would make swaping out speakers easier (read: NOT having to break out soldering iron each time).
    My question is, are these solderless connectors any good? If the crimps are tight, is there any difference b/t it and a connection that is actually soldered in place?
     
  2. vanguard

    vanguard Member

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    the only advantage to solder is mechanical. when you've found the amp's speaker soulmate solder it in; before that, use those tabs. unsoldering speaker tabs is a b**ch.
     
  3. Ampegasaur

    Ampegasaur Silver Supporting Member

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    They work well if you get high quality, not just cheapo flimsy connectors. I use mostly EV, and Eminence delta wich all have push in connectors for the wire. i like those better than solder, and easy to swap out.
     
  4. dave_mc

    dave_mc Member

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    if you're swapping a lot i'd definitely use the spade connectors

    heck i use them when i can even if i'm doing a permanent swap

    i do have an aversion to soldering, though :D
     
  5. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    These? don't know what you mean by the 1/4" mono plug, you don't need them.

    These work great as long as they're snug.



    [​IMG]
     
  6. LPMojoGL

    LPMojoGL Music Room Superstar Supporting Member

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    Works fine, go for it.
     
  7. Jef Bardsley

    Jef Bardsley Member

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    +1

    Use of them is required by the JIC spec, which covers heavy machinery subject to extreme vibration.

    Most speakers use .206" tabs, not 1/4".

    The tabs aren't as thick as they used to be, so I find I have to crimp the push-ons slightly so they don't fall off. Also, the good ones have a little locking tab in the center which you probably want to bend up, as otherwise they do not come off easily - the little bit of fiberboard the tabs are mounted on won't take a lot of stress, and the little wires to the speaker cone won't take any.
     
  8. KWCabs

    KWCabs Member

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    No difference. I use gold plated versions in all of our speaker cabinets, however, I don't just crimp them onto the wire, I crimp and solder to make sure there is a tight connection as it's an area that if used often can loosen. If the connector fits too loosely onto the tab on the speaker use a pair of small pliers and simply squeeze the connector edges a little to make them more snug, if too tight pry with a tiny screwdriver.
     
  9. vibrostrat43

    vibrostrat43 Supporting Member

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    The 1/4 inch he's talking about is a the 1/4 male that would go into the amp's speaker jack. Yes the solderless connectors are absolutely fine, and what you're talking about will work fine for testing one speaker at a time; however you won't be able to test them in pairs unless you make a second one and have an external speaker jack on your amp, or unless you make two other wires with the spade connectors on BOTH ends to connect the speakers together in parallel or series.

    I'd recommend you use at least 18 gauge wire for the project.
     

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