Solid Body vs SemiHollow? P&W Lead

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by brand0nized, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. brand0nized

    brand0nized Member

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    I'm a worship leader and I just started getting into electric. I'm really wondering what kind of guitar I should set my sights on for the future: a solid body or semihollow electric?

    For solid body, I'm looking at the Epiphone Les Paul Studio Worn Cherry http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/ENL1WCCH/

    For semi-hollow, I'm looking at the Epiphone Archtop Dot Electric http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/ETDTNACH/

    Bands I'm trying to emulate are Tenth Avenue North, Chris Tomlin, David Crowder*Band, Starfield, Lifehouse, and Switchfoot.

    I play mostly soft and mellow things, never too much on the rock 'n roll side, warm and bright.

    For contemporary worship sounds, what is your opinion on the better guitar fit for the situation?

    What exactly ARE the pro's and con's to solid body and semi-hollow bodies?
     
  2. treeofpain

    treeofpain Silver Supporting Member

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    Either would work, but a LP style might be easier to find a sound with. You need a decent amp as well.
     
  3. MKB

    MKB Silver Supporting Member

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    +1 on the amp comment, in many P+W situations you have to be very careful about your stage volume. Many well regarded tube guitar amps can sound very poor at extremely low volumes, and the traditional gear fixes such as power attenuators and separate amp rooms can be expensive and cumbersome. I'd suggest you look at modelers as they sound good at extremely low volumes, and can easily be scaled up in volume with the correct monitoring gear.

    I usually use a LP in my P+W work, sometimes a SG (mine has a full Ghost system in it so it has semi-acoustic sounds as well). I'm beginning to think a good SuperStrat with a Ghost system might be the best choice, or say a PRS Custom or other similar guitars with both single coil and humbucker tones.

    I don't feel as much need to exactly copy the tones on most P+W tunes as the focus of the song is not so much how it sounds. So I just use whatever guitar I feel most comfortable with, and try more to get the feel and intent of the part across.
     
  4. weshunter

    weshunter Supporting Member

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    I agree with everything here.

    But I'll say this also, you'll be better off with a tele than either of those types. It's more versatile. I'm a worship leader and I have a tele, a strat, and an Agile 3100. All are great guitars, but 9 times out of ten I play the tele. It just works better for more stuff than any of the others.
     
  5. weshunter

    weshunter Supporting Member

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    And as to the modeling thing -- if you have a good sound system and a very good sound team, then that can work. If you don't, then get an amp. An Egnater Tweaker is a good, cheap amp that's an appropriate amount of loud and is great with pedals. You can get one for $300-350 or so used.
     
  6. CaseyI

    CaseyI Member

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    Just pick the one you like the best and play it. It really doesn't matter. I lead from a 335, LP, or Tele depending on the mood I'm in.
     
  7. jklotz

    jklotz Supporting Member

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    You might also want to look at a Rowland 40xl amp. $225, versatile, plenty loud enough for lower volume gigs and light to carry around. Mine's been bullet proof so far.
     
  8. bobcs71

    bobcs71 Member

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    +1 on the Tele. IMO they are clearer for chords. The majority of guys I know use Teles & a Vox type amp for P&W. Hum canceling pickups in the Tele are helpful so you don't get the 60 cycle hum when things are quiet.

    To reinforce what was said about amps - either a modeler or a 5 watt tube head with a pedal for overdrive is the best bet. A plexiglass sheild in front of the 5 watter could even be helpful. Where I play there is an isolated room for the cabinet so I ran run higher powered amps.
     
  9. mwc2112

    mwc2112 Supporting Member

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    I agree. I think Agile LPs are far better value then the Epis. I also would consider looking at the Ibanez Artcores if you go the hollowbody route.
     
  10. Paul Anderberg

    Paul Anderberg Member

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    +1. I'd say Tele all the way.
     
  11. LJOHNS

    LJOHNS Member

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    I play a Strat every week. I just built a Tele that I plan to use some also. It really doesn't matter - play what you like. Also, I try to put my own style into our P&W songs. I don't want to copy exactly what everyone else is doing. Close, yes but copy no.
     
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  12. Jdobson

    Jdobson Member

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    :agree Same here. Does it always work out? Probably not. But I gotta play true to myself also. A few blues licks/pentatonic stuff thrown into Hillsong United/Jesus Culture/Tomlin/Baloche never hurt anybody, right?
     
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  13. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    Another vote for a tele. I have a LP, a 335, two strats and a partscaster tele. The tele is the most versatile. It does rhythm better than any of them, handles solos nicely, is light in weight and just sounds and feels right for a majority of P&W music. My 335 sounds great when doing some jazzy P&W stuff the leader comes up with on occasion, but 9 out of 10 times, I go to the tele for everything else.
     
  14. Deathmonkey

    Deathmonkey Member

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    If you can swing it, you might take a look at a used Epiphone Ultra II. I recommended it in a similar thread not long ago. It has the "Nanomag" acoustic pickup. This way you could not only cover acoustic parts, but the bands you mentioned often layer an acoustic part under the rock guitars, and you can run both the acoustic ouput (to a PA) and the electric (to your amp) at the same time. I used to do that with a Parker, and it's a great sound.

    http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Out-of-Production/Les-Paul-Ultra-II.aspx

    The Ultra II is also chambered :D

    They do make an updated version (Ultra III) as well.

    http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Les-Paul-Ultra-III.aspx
     
  15. budglo58

    budglo58 Member

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    Not a big tele fan, but the semi hollow is one of the most versatile guitars on the planet.Whether you are playing rhythm or lead , clean or dirty it gets the job done .I play both rhythm and lead on my P and W team and it covers alot of territory .I have a LP and it isnt nearly as versatile and anything with single coils are prone to hum unless you only use the hum cancelling position.
     
  16. lucaso

    lucaso Member

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    If you're just getting into electric there are a lot of P&W options available. However, it's not just a guitar thing. The electric is a different beast altogether and requires a combination of good amps, pedals, settings and a guitar to sound good.

    The stage volume is a major factor at church unless you play at a mega-church with a full stage facility and a 4,000 person seating array.

    I used to lead worship with my Strat through a POD X3. It worked fantastic and required minimal attention once the settings are smoothed over. The bad thing was that my tone could only come through the monitors and it messed with the vocalists and other musicians (i.e. I couldn't hear enough, they could hear too much).

    So I switched to a Mesa Boogie Lonestar Special. This amp will dial in at 5 watts, 15 watts, and 30 watts. At 5 watts and a 9 O'clock volume setting it's almost too loud but sounds great. With a little sound baffling you can manage the stage volume and limit the amount of instrumentation coming through the sound board. Of course the amp, pedal setup is much more expensive than just a guitar and a POD.

    I now use a semi-hollow electric (Gibson CS356). I like the PAF style humbuckers which are clear, articulate, and a little more full sounding that single coils. They aren't muddy like some humbuckers can be. Make sure that whatever guitar you buy, you try first on the setup you want to use (POD, amps, etc...).

    Both setups can work well in my experience but you just have to dial it in right. Lincoln Brewster plays through a POD onstage for heaven's sakes and his sound is to die for so it can't be bad. Happy to talk more with you if you like.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  17. ZDPrice

    ZDPrice Member

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    ^^^^^This. Fender Blues Junior is a great amp for worship leading, but only if you can crank it. :JAM
     
  18. picknpluck

    picknpluck Member

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    Since this is TGP, get both! In all seriousness, I use my Strat and my 335 the most when I play at Church. If I could only have one guitar, it would be my 335 without a doubt. And I use an amp (Blues Deluxe). There was weeping and gnashing of teeth among the sound ministry, but they couldn't articulate a very good reason behind their zero stage volume policy--especially since our associate pastor plays bass through an amp and we have acoustic drums on stage. I keep the volume at reasonable levels and I'm still battling with the sound guys who insist on burying the guitars in the FOH mix. We've come a long way, though.
     
  19. brand0nized

    brand0nized Member

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    Thanks for all the help guys! As for my amp, I plan to run direst (or atleast for now) to the mixer. At our church, we constantly rotate leaders and musicians, and I use public transportation to get home sometimes, so bringing an amp wouldn't be very practical for me. How will this affect my sound?
     
  20. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Member

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    I play in a P/W band and play a variety of different guitars.... LPs, 335s, full hollow-bodies, strats, teles, guitars with P-90s, even an acrylic bodied strat with hot rails. They all will do the job just fine. The guitars I get the most compliments about are my Les Paul, my 335 (semi-hollow), and my Washburn J-7 (full hollow body). I really like using strats.

    Find a guitar you like and are comfortable with. There really is no "right" or "wrong" guitar for praise music.
     

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