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soloing: double stops and chords

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by wagtail, May 20, 2011.

  1. wagtail

    wagtail Member

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    Jan 7, 2008
    I have learned to solo with single note runs in a variety of keys, using both pentatonic and other patterns, but I'm struggling with incorporating double stops and chords into those single note lines.

    Any suggestions on how to approach improving the textures and variety of my soloing using chords and double stops, or other techniques?
     
  2. sausagefingers

    sausagefingers Supporting Member

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    'Neath the shade of an old walnut tree
    Go to the source: Start immersing yourself in Chuck Berry tunes. Learn all his licks. Double stops galore.
     
  3. gennation

    gennation Member

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    I agree, double-stops...Chuck's got 'em :)

    I have a few some some online lessons of mine: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/AdvPent/AvdPentTOC.htm

    Here's a few examples:

    Audio for tab: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/Lessons/AdvPent/Lesson36.mp3 (kind of Blues Rock)

    [​IMG]

    Audio for tab: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/Lessons/AdvPent/Lesson45.mp3 (kind of funk rock)

    [​IMG]

    Audio for tab: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/Lessons/AdvPent/Lesson34.mp3 (maybe country or country blues, but it covers a bulk of the double stops you can use for 7th chords, and it shows you how you can move the same double stops for each chord int he progression)

    [​IMG]

    Audio for tab: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/Lessons/AdvPent/Lesson40.mp3 (definitely country, this is Pete Anderson's solo on Guitars and Cadillac's by Dwight Youkum - it's got some killer double stop bends)

    [​IMG]
     
  4. wagtail

    wagtail Member

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    Thanks. This is a good start for me. Any other thoughts are appreciated.
     
  5. Full Monty

    Full Monty Member

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    Colchester, England
    You could try using harmonised scales, playing on adjacent and non adjacent strings. These can sound particularly nice when playing country or pop although you can use them pretty much anywhere. For blues and rock and roll Chuck pretty much wrote the book (even if he 'borrowed' a lot of it). I like to slide in to partial 7 or 9 chords either from a fret or two frets away, up or down they both sound good as long as you time them right. But the best advice I can give is to go out to jam sessions, listen, watch and absorb what the other guys do and then try it yourself, not just at home but when you get up to play with the other guys. Above all, don't be afraid to experiment when you're out playing because it's about attitude, not just technique.
     
  6. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    Location:
    Encinitas, SoCal
    Double stops - roots and thirds in key of E-mixolydian for blues -
    (using D-natural instead of D#) on 1st and 3rd strings.

    NOte - these are all Mixolydian because these are common blues riffs. You can use these same patterns for major keys, but you'd start in a different spot.

    | 12--10--9--7--5--4--2--0
    | ---------------------------
    | 13--11--9--7--6--4--2--1
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------

    (note - if you want to use a major scale instead of mixolydian, just think of the key starting on the 4th scale tone, E-mixo = A-major, so this also works for A-Major)

    Note that you can take this same finger patter and use strings 2 and 4 and you have the same pattern in the key of B-mixo (or E-major)

    | ---------------------------
    | 12--10--9--7--5--4--2--0
    | ---------------------------
    | 13--11--9--7--6--4--2--1
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------


    Or... on 3rd and 4-string - this is the Key of E above, inverted, meaning you are playing the roots on the lower string (4) instread of the higher one (1)

    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | 13--11--9---7--6--4--2--1
    | 14--12--11--9--7--6--4--2
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------

    You can also move this pattern to other strings for different keys (key of C#):

    | 13--11--9---7--6--4--2--1
    | 14--12--11--9--7--6--4--2
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------

    Key of B

    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | 13--11--9---7--6--4--2--1
    | 14--12--11--9--7--6--4--2
    | ---------------------------


    Key of F#

    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | ---------------------------
    | 13--11--9---7--6--4--2--1
    | 14--12--11--9--7--6--4--2

    FYI - I did this all in my head with no guitar to reference - if there are errors I will fix them.
     

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