[SOLVED] Questions on the '65 Fender Deluxe Reverb RI

tseliot

Member
Messages
79
Hi all,

I would like to buy my first tube amp, mainly for home playing/recording (I would use my Mustang III to play at parties, etc.). I am looking for an amp that can give me a nice (blackface) clean sound, without breaking up, that I would use with pedals. I narrowed it down to the '65 Princeton Reverb RI and the 65 Deluxe Reverb RI, leaning more towards the latter.

Before I actually go to the shop to try the Deluxe Reverb (the Princeton is not available where I live), I would like to ask a few questions about it, in the light of what I learnt on this forum:

1) When some forum users say the amp is too loud for playing at home (I live in a condominium), does it mean that they simply cannot crank it, or that even a decent clean sound would be way too loud? (my mustang III is very loud but it comes with a master volume). Just to be clear, by "clean", I mean clean with no crunch.

2) I read a lot of threads about the bright cap that doesn't make the amp sound too good (maybe thin?) at low volumes, and that the normal channel is not affected. Is either fact true? This is more to know which channel I should spend more time with at the shop, to hear what the amp sounds like at a low volume. I am aware that a mod would be an option (should I buy the amp).

3) I also read that input two has less gain (-6dB), compared to input one. I was thinking of using that, should volume be an issue. Would my HSS strat still sound good through it? Or would it be a bad idea?

Thank you in advance for your help.
 

batfish

Member
Messages
285
1) it probably means they can't crank it. It sounds nice at low volume. If you're just after a nice fender clean, it's very nice. If your after the SRV kind of edge sound, it doesn't do that until moderately loud

2). There is a bright cap on the vibrato channel. I have no issues with it and don't understand all the fuss about it. It does interfere with some overdrive/distortion/fuzz pedals, emphasizing the bright fizzy stuff. It has less an affect as the amp is turned up and it does not make all drives sound weird, just some. My od808 sounds good with it, even at low volume where it should be having an effect. My tonebender does sound fizzy at low volume, but fine when the amp is turned up a bit

3) it will sound good in the low input.

Bottom line, I bought mine new and expected all these problems I keep reading about, but mine Has been nice right out of the box (literally). Play one for a while, mess with the EQ and tone and guitar volume and give it a chance.
 

SoundsGood

Member
Messages
927
I have a deluxe reverb reissue and absolutely love it. It can get to some pretty high volume, before breakup. Plus, it is okay at bedroom levels. I've noticed that it loses it warm blackface tone a bit when below the 2. I set the volume between 2 and 4 mostly, depending on the situation. I haven't had it mic'ed yet. But we are opening for a friend's band soon. At that time we will be all mixed, mic'ed and monitored.

I clipped the bright cap, replaced the tubes with teslas, and put a cannabis rex into it. (At the ten year mark I had this done along with a servicing of the entire amp.) It is warmer and really did tame the brittleness at the top end of the frequency range. I didn't notice any loss of tone.
 

TheWayfarer84

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,871
I have a 1973, but not a ton of difference in the two.

It's fine for at home clean sounds. I usually keep it under 4 and just use pedals for dirt. Not a huge difference in volume than my old Princeton. The 12" sounds bigger than the PR at lower volumes.

I finally clipped the bright cap. If you're planning on running it low and using pedals, you'll probably want to do this.
The Normal channel does not have the bright cap, but it also does not have the reverb/tremolo. If use pedals for these effects, then it may not matter to you. Tube amps have lethal voltages inside them, even off and unplugged so please learn how to discharge them properly or have a tech do the mod for you.
 

Figaro

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,778
The larger cabinet of the Deluxe does make a difference. The Princeton Reverb with its smaller cabinet, even if you install a 12" speaker just doesn't have as full of a sound. The Princeton does overdrive a little sooner but there is only a small difference in their volumes. Just use an overdrive or distortion pedal for around the house with the Deluxe Reverb.
 

candid_x

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,676
1. "At home" does not define a volume level. For me I played it usually between 3-4, and never had a neighbor complain. I also lived in a house alone at that time. If I had a crabby ole lady, she'd have to go if she didn't like it, which may be why I live alone. While raising kids, I played in the garage and try to always be considerate with volume, within reason.

2. To clip or to mitigate brightness with tubes and/or speaker is an individual choice. I left the bright cap because once I had the the right speaker and tubes for my personal taste in place, the cap presented no problem, and it sounded fine with pedals. The Normal channel has a sound all its own and I would not bring the vibe and reverb over to it.

3. I always used the higher input regardless of the guitar.

I sometimes still miss it.
 

tseliot

Member
Messages
79
Thank you everybody for your help. I went to the shop, played the Deluxe Reverb, and it sounded every bit as amazing as I thought it would. It also works pretty well with my Timmy. I'll post an NGD as soon as I get more familiar with it :)
 

JDandCoke

Member
Messages
1,962
If you can have a tv on then you can use the drri, although it does sound a bit better when turned up a little further (to what I'd describe as home theater type volume), should be fine for most apartments that aren't paper walls at night.

The brightness of the reverb channel does bother me, but it disappears super quick once you start turning up the volume, it's shrill at quiet talking volume and mostly gone by the time you're at raised voices levels. When I'm playing at night I do use the normal channel though just to avoid it

I did swap the speaker out on mine to a cannabis Rex and found it to be a huge improvement in every possible way. Clearer, Warner, more balanced, more responsive etc.

I don't notice a massive difference between the inputs on a channel, they both sound fine.
Takes pedals really well

If anything I found it breaks up just a little too early, struggles to keep up with q loud drummer in small venues whilst staying super clean
 

Mondoslug

Member
Messages
3,706
I just bought a DRRI Head and am using it with an ext. 1x12 cab. It's fine for low volume, just turn it down. I thought maybe I'd lose the bright cap also but it's fine, I've grown used to it - it's not bothering me. I have experimented with a few different types of pre amp tubes though but with the stock ones I'd be okay also. One thing with the DRRI though is, at least mine…it takes on a slightly different thing between 6-7 on the volume control, so if you ever play out & have a chance to up the volume, you get that also.
 

Robert Sands

Member
Messages
355
I have had a DRRI for better than ten years. You need to turn the amp up to at least 3 or else it doesn't have that full rich sound. You will not like it below that volume. Only you can deicide whether or not it's too loud at that point. I had the bright cap snipped. Gets rid of some of that high end sizzle people talk about. Not a major difference but some. I also put in a different speaker, a Weber, and it did bring the amp to a different level tone wise. Also some vintage tubes biased a little hotter notched it up a bit. A wonderful amp. You will dig it.
 

RJLII

Member
Messages
10,304
I had my DRRI for ten years too. I didn't snip the bright cap, but I did get a decent set of tubes and bias it properly. It was very cold from the factory. Based on your stated situation, I think you'll love it.
 




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