Some guitars I came across at my grandfather's house

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by robyogi, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. robyogi

    robyogi Silver Supporting Member

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    Okay, I posted a thread on the amp section about some amps I found while I was at my grandparent's house last weekend and got some good feedback. Now, I am wondering what to do with some guitars I found. I guess I am wondering how "valuable" these are, and if you were the one who found them (and were likely to inherit them) what would you do with them? Keep them as stock as possible? Get them set up to be played? Sell them? I'm just not sure what the best way to go would be. Anyway, here's what I found:

    What appears to be a 1940s or 1950s Gibson ES-125. I know it's an ES-125, as that's stamped on the inside of the guitar (could see it through the f-hole). I just don't know if it's a 40s or 50s. From what I can tell on ebay, it appears to be a 1940s. There's one P-90 style pickup near the neck. The frets are corroded to the point of needing replacement. The back of the neck has some chips and wear. I didn't see any wood cracks though. Tuners are corroded a little as well. This was kept in a case, but the case was pretty worn and flimsy.

    Again, from what I can tell on ebay, I found a 1960s red Gretsch Duo-Jet. This has a Burns trem and the metal pickups (smaller humbuckers) with the patent inscribed on them. This one is in pretty good shape. It was in a nice gray hardshell case. It seems like it could be played with a basic setup.

    A Fender P-Bass, serial number 165156. This one needs a setup, but otherwise seems playable. It had some wear on the neck, around the 3rd to 5th frets.

    A semi-hollow Teisco del Ray bass in a very flimsy case. This one had a lot of finish cracks but none that went through the wood, at least that I could see. I picked it up and played it for a minute or so, and like the Fender, it seemed to need a setup and tuning.

    So, if you found these, or found out that you were about to inherit them (I was told he'll probably just give them to me as I'm the only guitar player in the family), what would you do with them? Fix? Keep as is? Sell? Are they more "valuable" in one form or another (stock versus repaired)? Not sure what to do...thanks in advance for any advice.
     
  2. lowendgenerator

    lowendgenerator Member

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    Take pics, make internet friends crap drawers. That's what I would do.
     
  3. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Supporting Member

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    The only one I can comment on with any authority is the ES125. (That was my guitar for my entire teen years). They're not very valuable but they play well and sound good. Assuming it's fairly clean and you get the frets done, it's probably worth about $1100-$1250. It has no real collector value, and it's definitely worth more to a player with the frets done. Given the relatively low resale value, I consider them to be one of the best values in an archtop and a fine jazz guitar if you can live without a cutaway.
     
  4. billywade

    billywade Member

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    I'm no expert and pics would be helpful but I'd say the Fender Bass is going to be the big money item out of those. If it is original (serial # indicates '66) and playable with original finish, pickups, parts, case etc... I'd think upwards of 2K$ maybe more. The ES (although a great guitar) is not going to bring a whole lot. The other posted seemed right in his assesment. I've never personally seen a Teisco go for more than a couple hundred but I haven't payed close attention. I'm sure there are some big money models out there.
     
  5. justonwo

    justonwo Member

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    I would most definitely keep them, get them in playable condition, and use them as they were intended. Sounds like a really nice find. Wish my grandparents were musically inclined . . .
     
  6. 1959burst

    1959burst boogieman

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    +11111111!:cool:
     
  7. gkoelling

    gkoelling Member

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    Perfect!:AOK
     
  8. gkoelling

    gkoelling Member

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    My Grandfather played horns. I have a trumpet, Coronet, Sax, etc. that were his. None of them playable, I'm sure and who knows their worth?
     
  9. Karmateria

    Karmateria Member

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    Those are gonna be priceless to you some day... very cool that your Grandfather is a musician. I have a few of my father's things and they mean the world to me. Never knew my grandfather but I have a pocketwatch that was his, and that's cool too.

    Karma
     
  10. smiert spionam

    smiert spionam Member

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    Very cool indeed! Your grandpa had good taste, too.

    I agree about the ES-125 -- great players, though it's rare for them to go much above $1k.

    The Jet Firebird (that's what the red version of the Duo is called), depending on year and condition, is probably in the $2-4k range. Late '60s would be on the low side. Filtertrons are great. The single cutaway Jets are more expensive, but the doublecuts have their adherents.
     
  11. Radax

    Radax Member

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    Xmas in July.
    Mike
     
  12. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    Yay!
     
  13. Reeek

    Reeek Member

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  14. robyogi

    robyogi Silver Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the input and the site. Very cool site. Going by the info there, the Gretsch would be a 61-67: it definitely has the Burns trem and Filtertrons. It's a double-cut for sure. The Gibson is a 1940s ES-125, with the trapeze bridge. Someone here already mentioned the P-Bass is a 1966. Good info to have, even though I won't be selling anything. Karmeteria's right - the sentimental value is too high. I'm just glad my grandfather's motto has always been, "buy junk and junk is what you have." It means he always had quality instruments. I'll probably start getting them into playable condition, starting with the Gretsch. Thanks again for all the input!
     
  15. michaelg

    michaelg Member

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    great finds!!! Congrats!!
     
  16. Motorhed

    Motorhed Member

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    Even if guitar wasn't his main insturment, I still say keep em!!! Its just too cool not too.

    I have my grandfather's guitar, I'd guess its from the '20s or '30s as he had it since he was really young. The headstock was broken off YEARS ago and its long gone but he never did get rid of it and I can't either even though it'll never be playable again, I keep meaning to give it a good cleaning and polish and putting it on a stand in my room but I just never get around to doing it. He never even played in my lifetime and I started after he died but it means alot that I ended up with it, which was by accident but I still love having it.
     
  17. JoeYello

    JoeYello Member

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    Keep them! Clean them up and enjoy them. You'll think of your grandfather every time you play them, that's a wonderful tribute to him.
     
  18. Chris Rice

    Chris Rice Member

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    Oh, absolutely agreed with everyone here.

    My dad has my great-grandfather's lap steel and my great-grandmother's (on the other side) Hammond organ. They are family heirlooms, and are full of sentimental value.


    The ES-125, as Jim said, can be a great guitar. I have an L-48 (basically the same thing without the pickup) with a DeArmond floating pickup on it that I dearly love. I've played a good number of ES-125s and I do like them almost as much as my L-48. The P-Bass is also very cool, I've been trying to get one that belongs to my old Junior High School from about the same year (an old friend of mine is working in the district).


    The Gretsch should be a very cool guitar as well, I don't have as much experience with them.

    Teisco's can be great in their own funky way, a good setup will do wonders for it.
     
  19. Curly

    Curly Member

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    great story ... you've succeeded in making us jealous!

    I've been jonesing for a Gretsch lately, so I have a feeling you'll love the Duo Jet.

    I wouldn't assume that the frets on the Gibson need replacing until a luthier has a good look at it. I think a good cleaning might do wonders.

    enjoy
     

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