• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.

some thoughts about the Celestion V30 spike

ballynally

Member
Messages
2,257
Some people love the V30 others do hate them. Most comment about that 'bite' or 'spike', but what is it exactly?
I used to think it was just a big ear piercing spike but then i looked at the graph and there was no obvious higher one compared to both a Greenback and other speakers. In fact it is more flat overall and the spike doesn't look that obvious on the graph. But then i looked closer at frequencies. Most speakers will have a drop off around 1 and 2 Kh and a lift between 2 and 4 Khz. That's where your mid-highs to highs are located. After that it usually gradually goes down.
What i've noticed is that with the V30 the lift starts earlier, around 1.5 Khz. That gives it a broader lift than others. My guess is that that's exactly why it sounds more pronounced. The lift has more 'body', a wider Q, and there is less of a mid drop off.
Caveat: i know graphs don't say everything but it seems the only difference on paper between let's say a Heritage greenback and a V30. It is better to compare graphs of the same company as the measuring instruments are the same..
 

LPV

Member
Messages
717
Interesting analysis. From an ears only point of "view", I personally find the v30 has to be pushed to get into it's zone. Is a great sounding speaker and not harsh or spikey at all when cranked. But at low volumes it doesn't really shine.
 

MrMilkman

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
212
Interesting analysis. From an ears only point of "view", I personally find the v30 has to be pushed to get into it's zone. Is a great sounding speaker and not harsh or spikey at all when cranked. But at low volumes it doesn't really shine.
That's my feeling as well. I just put some V30s in my 2x12 and they really like being pushed with my 1987. I don't find them harsh at all, but they are definitely not happy at very low volumes. After my first band rehearsal with them, having tried them in place of a pair of Cannabis Rexes, I thought, "Yep, that's why these are so popular."
 
  • Like
Reactions: LPV

LPV

Member
Messages
717
Yep, I loaded a 1960a with v30s to use with my 2555 and as soon as I got it up to band levels it was like "whoa, there it is".
 

Mr. Bertha

Member
Messages
1,103
Interesting analysis. From an ears only point of "view", I personally find the v30 has to be pushed to get into it's zone. Is a great sounding speaker and not harsh or spikey at all when cranked. But at low volumes it doesn't really shine.
The spike goes away when cranked probably due to the Fletcher Munson curve. Basically, we hear mids more accurately at low volume and our ears/mind attenuates mids in comparison to lows and highs at high volume.
 

eriwebnerr

Member
Messages
2,789
i looked at the graph and there was no obvious higher one compared to both a Greenback and other speakers
Agreed. I think the 2k spike gets blamed a lot when it's other factors. Most guitar speakers have a 2k spike and some comparatively greater than the v30. I think it's because the midrange might be described as "aggressive" and the tone is very "textured" on a v30 that the spike is more noticeable. Not sure but I generally like these speakers and don't get the bad rap.

Kind of like tube screamers. Every one thinks they need to mod it and hate the "mid hump" until you get playing at band levels. Then it's like "oh yah - that's perfect" :)
 

chillybilly

Member
Messages
3,697
I don't say this to be a contrarian or a cork sniffer but with the staggering variety of options on the market in terms of model, vendor, and/or materials I would think any misgivings about the V30 (full disclosure: I dislike them and think they're honkfests) would liberate a player to try something else.
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,587
Those frequency response charts are extremely tough to make any kind of real world sense out of. On some parts of those graphs, major changes lead to minor changes of what we perceive. On other parts, very minor, seemingly insignificant changes on the graph can lead to major changes in what we perceive. It takes a lot of training and real world experience to make heads or tails of them. I know a lot of people who reference them, and very few who can actually understand them.

It's funny how so many people dislike the V30 on this site. They're one of the more popular speakers out there. To me, they're one of the few speakers that doesn't sound like a parked wah with an odd resonant frequency spike that just won't go away. That's what greenbacks and their family of speakers sound like to me. But tone is subjective, and everyone has a different opinion, don't they?

Though I don't own any V30's. They're good speakers, but I'm more of a vintage Jensen/EVM/JBL or Celestion Blue/Gold fan. The V30 is on my shortlist though, as I've always enjoyed playing through them. I never thought Marshall made good amps until I heard one through a V30.
 

wickedcookie

Member
Messages
1,165
Those frequency response charts are extremely tough to make any kind of real world sense out of. On some parts of those graphs, major changes lead to minor changes of what we perceive. On other parts, very minor, seemingly insignificant changes on the graph can lead to major changes in what we perceive. It takes a lot of training and real world experience to make heads or tails of them. I know a lot of people who reference them, and very few who can actually understand them.
Exactly this. Guitar speakers are not linear devices at all, and their frequency response graphs can be quite misleading if you are using them to decide which speaker you want. To the OP, I would point out that, logically, the small difference "on paper" between the V30 and Heritage GB compared to the rather significant difference between them in actual use would seem to support the notion that using graphs alone to compare speakers, and make conclusions about why and how they sound as they do, can indeed be very misleading.
 

mikebat

Member
Messages
11,543
Kind of like tube screamers. Every one thinks they need to mod it and hate the "mid hump" until you get playing at band levels. Then it's like "oh yah - that's perfect" :)
Sorry for getting OT but.....

In all contexts, I don't like that mid hump. Sure it cuts through in a band mix, but it does so in the way Fran Drescher's voice cuts through in a room of crowded people.

What I always hated about OD pedals based on the TS circuit is that you spend all this money getting a great Marshall style amp, round bottom, articulate top end, then you step on your TS and "bye bye round low end, hello nasally mids."

Maybe I would like them more if I played Fender type amps
 

eriwebnerr

Member
Messages
2,789
it does so in the way Fran Drescher's voice cuts through in a room of crowded people
LOL :D

It's definitely context specific. I'm not really a screamer fan myself, prefer SD-1 and variants, but my point was more that people tend to blame the EQ when the compression, muddiness, symmetrical clipping may be more to blame. I feel the same about the v30. The 2k spike gets the bum wrap when that's not really what they're not liking.
 

ballynally

Member
Messages
2,257
I do understand the limitations of a graph.i'm also not saying anything for or against theV30.they do work in some applications.and imightbetotallywrongaboutthewholething.but i try to understand the difference between fi a greenback and aV30.my ears hear one and the graph shows it ithink.
 

Axe-Man

Member
Messages
7,041
What spike? Lol

I all seriousness, lots of people on here complain about V30's when they buy a new cab with them. New V30's aren't the most impressive speaker and they take a long time to come good IMO; they need some serious volume for a really good amount of hours to sweeten up.

Once worn in they are great.

I've run Fenders, Voxes, Marshalls, Mesa's and Soldano's through my V30 cabs and every single one was fantastic. They all sounded killer.

Guys that have played for years and heard everything usually go, wow, that's a seriously great sounding cab and I go yeah, just a cheap Orange cab with a humble set of beautifully worn in Chinese V30's.
 

382

Member
Messages
89
I eq my amps to sound good with what I have in the cabinet. I admit V30's have a hump to them but when i swap speakers i change my settings.
If you drop V's into a cabinet that had darker speakers, especially if they are new, you're not gonna be impressed. I am partial to G12H30's.
 

CallEOD

Senior Member
Messages
2,104
I love V30s. To me they have a sizzle and presence others don't. If you like smooth jazz tones, not for you. If you like crunchy rock they are where it's at. Also a big bottom end that's not boomy, just big.
You should be getting sizzle & presence from the amp not the speakers IMO.

Vintage 30 = Modern 60 watts .... funny.

Nothing Vintage about them.

If you have amps that are upper mid heavy they aren't very compatible.

However if you play alot of drop tunings they cut thru well.
 

macmax77

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
13,165
Sorry for getting OT but.....

In all contexts, I don't like that mid hump. Sure it cuts through in a band mix, but it does so in the way Fran Drescher's voice cuts through in a room of crowded people.

What I always hated about OD pedals based on the TS circuit is that you spend all this money getting a great Marshall style amp, round bottom, articulate top end, then you step on your TS and "bye bye round low end, hello nasally mids."

Maybe I would like them more if I played Fender type amps

Love!!!!!
 

ballynally

Member
Messages
2,257
The spike goes away when cranked probably due to the Fletcher Munson curve. Basically, we hear mids more accurately at low volume and our ears/mind attenuates mids in comparison to lows and highs at high volume.
And that's why it is so important how the frequencies between 1 and 3 behave.
Btw: i didnt start this thread for liking or disliking the V30.to each his own..
 






Trending Topics

Top Bottom