Son Wants to Learn Drums, Need Info

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Last Nerve, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. ieso

    ieso Member

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    Start with a pad and work on rudiments

    Then get an electronic kit.

    I had a good Mapex acoustic set years ago but it caused too much trouble. Roland V kit for the win.
     
  2. Tomo El Gato

    Tomo El Gato Member

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    Unless there's absolutely no way to deal with the volume level - start with an acoustic kit. The level of excitement and fun you get from playing even a below average acoustic kit is miles above the best e-kit. And it's the real deal, not a simulation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2019
  3. ToneDeVille

    ToneDeVille Member

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    14 yr old son who wants to learn drums needs to sign up for drum class at school. After a couple of years of school drumming he'll be ready for a kit.
     
  4. Daytona57

    Daytona57 Member

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    There is alot ot info on drumming forums. You should look at used semi-pro kits as the 1st owner takes the depreciation hit and have better resale value.

    A semi-pro small bop kit, 18" bass drum and Ludwig Acrolite aluminum snare, can be found used on CL, at good prices. The bop kits are not as loud as a 24" bass drum and good for recording. The Bop kit is also a small footprint that fits in tiny club stages with volume restrictions and can be micd, if more volume is needed.

    Cymbals are the most expensive and important pieces of the kit. If you buy used professional cymbals, you will get your money back. You need hi hats, a couple of crashes and a ride.

    Memphis Drums, have great videos of every type of drums and cymbals, demo'd by a pro drummer, makes selection and matching sounds easier.

    Lessons are important as it is easy to pick up bad habits and form that is difficult to correct.

    Drumming will improve your playing in other instruments, developing rythem, timing and arrangements.

    YMMV
     
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  5. NashSG

    NashSG Member

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    I've done some rudiment work myself with a pad and a metronome. That work will tighten your inner clock up. When I was doing it all the time and then I got in a band playing bass, I swear time seemed to stand still at some points. It just sharpens up the musical senses. Need to get back to doing that and hopefully within a few months will have my kit setup at the house.
     
  6. Hulakatt

    Hulakatt Supporting Member

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    Yep. I've been playing drums for over 20 years now and this is a great way to go. Electronic drums are great when they're quality but a very different feel from acoustic drums.

    Take lessons and take them from someone who plays the kind of music your son wants to play.

    early rudiments are pretty easy but it gets a lot harder to start rudiments on a kit. All of your limbs working differently but together is a whole nother level of splitting your brain! Once he gets that down, it gets easier again.
     
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  7. Hulakatt

    Hulakatt Supporting Member

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    Tell him guitar driven music always fade in and out of popular music but drummers are in demand in pretty much every genre of music, even the digital stuff. Nobody can program drums better than a good drummer.
     
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  8. Bort

    Bort Member

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    An acoustic set with those Remo mesh heads is the way to go! They’re pretty dang quiet, and you can easily swap regular batters when noise is less of an issue ( like for a few hours on the weekend, or whatever).

    As far as the quality of the kit: as long as it’s not a toy kit or some weird off-brand, it really won’t matter for a few years— it’s gonna sound like sh**, no matter what! Any used Tama, Yamaha, or Pearl kit will be just fine.

    I also recommend starting with a four piece kit (kick, snare, tom, floor tom). A- they’re cheaper and take up less space, and B- learning to make the most of a limited setup will serve him very well in the future.
     
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  9. phoghat

    phoghat Member

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    Just get him a cheap acoustic kit and tell him to make a band immediately.
     
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  10. HERSCHEL

    HERSCHEL Member

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    Element is an okay line. If you buy new you'll need a new set of skins rather quickly. The hardware is sub-Atlas Standard, I'd think the throne and kick pedal would be spots to upgrade there, but the rest should be fine for quite a while.

    I hate ZBTs, tbh, I'd look at Paiste PST7s or Sabian B8X/Pros or, better yet, PST8s for about $25 more for a box set are better than all of them and, for me, you're now starting in the "I won't need to replace them" territory. If you can scrounge a bit more, Meinl Classics Custom are nice.
     
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  11. svenhoek

    svenhoek Member

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    Depending where you are, drum kits can be easy to find for really cheap. I've done both the electronic and acoustic. I loved the Roland V Drums, but when my friend brought over his relatively cheap, piece meal acoustic kit, it was just so much more organic and fun to play. They both have their place, it's good to give them both a try before committing.

    Drum kits are one of the hardest things to sell, with a few exceptions. So I agree with the folks that say find a used, semi pro kit. I've found $3000+ kits for $800. And it is much easier if you can buy everything at once, it's amazing how quick the cymbals and hardware will add up. Decent cymbals are much easier on the ears.

    There are options for bringing the volume down on acoustic kits, so I wouldn't rule them out just due to noise levels.

    I'm a big fan of the smaller jazz, be bop kits. They're still plenty loud for beginners, small gigs, recording. If you're not starting a Zep tribute band, there is no need to get a massive kit.

    Drums are super fun, you'll all have a great time with them.
     
  12. Dannyz

    Dannyz Member

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    Whats your take on Pearl Decade maple 5 piece drum kit? I've been thinkin about that model in Green Sparkle and adding a 2nd floor tom.
     
  13. HERSCHEL

    HERSCHEL Member

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  14. Theorist

    Theorist Supporting Member

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  15. Bogner

    Bogner Member

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    I personally would never go electric drums but that is me. Acoustic drums all the way so long as your set up for it space wise and the sound is not going to be an issue. I would find a nice Gretsch set or DW set and be done with it. For starters they have deals on cymbal packs all the time so you can get a set that matches for a reasonable price (compared to buying individually) and a cage may save you some money over buying individual drum stands and cymbal stands. The cymbals and hardware etc can get very pricey but there are certainly deals to be had on all this stuff. Just like buying a guitar...easier to get a good kit and not a hello kitty starter kit for $119.00. If you get a good kit used and it doesn't work out, you can unload it without the massive hit. Regarding pedals for the high hat and bass drum, it is best to just go into a music store and kick on some and see what feels good.

    I can help you further if you have questions or need help deciding on things. Drums are a blast and a fun path to venture down.
     
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  16. John_M

    John_M Supporting Member

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    Love this. My dad had me as a guitar player with a full stack and my brother with an 8 piece kit, double kick. Ah, the 80s. Cops came a few times. Pop had wireless headphones so he could watch tv while we were in the basement. Lived on a 2 acre lot, still managed to bother the neighbors. Miss ya Pop!

    Electric kit the way to go. Then try to steer him to guitar - more gigs.
     
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  17. SgtThump

    SgtThump Supporting Member

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    I didn't read all the posts, but www.drummerworld.com is a fantastic forum full of very nice folks.
     
  18. Tomo El Gato

    Tomo El Gato Member

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    In what universe? You can be a mediocre drummer and never be out of work.
     
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  19. John_M

    John_M Supporting Member

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    Most places around here are doing acoustic duos and singles only. The places for full bands are drying up.
     
  20. Tomo El Gato

    Tomo El Gato Member

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    Odd, but that's a rather local peculiarity. I've never met a decent drummer complaining desperate to find a gig.
    If you're a good drummer, move to any big music city, and I guarantee you'll work. Good luck with that if you're even a great guitar player.
     

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