Sound Dampening Solutions

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by bilbal, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. bilbal

    bilbal Member

    Messages:
    8,487
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    I am looking for a simple, inexpensive but effective way to dampen the sound of my Marshall 2x12 closed-back guitar cabinet. I am presently looking at my Sweetwater catalog. In it they offer all sorts of Auralex Roominator solutions with wide open price points. Can't I just somehow put something underneath the cabinet to lessen the bass "boom" and effectively quiet it down? I seem to remember there being a pad that allows the speaker/cab to be off the floor somehow but I cannot find it. What do you guys use to do what I am trying to explain? I apologize in advance for my horrible description of what I want to do.

    Wait...here it is...they are called MoPad, Gramma, Subdude isolation risers. Have any of you guys used these things? Do they work? I just want to find something that will give my neighbors a break from the booming bass this cab screams with. Do these things work? They are extremely inexpensive.

    http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/GRAMMA/
    http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SubDude/
    http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/GreatGRAMMA/

    Cool,
    Bill
     
  2. bosstone

    bosstone Member

    Messages:
    3,405
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Location:
    Oakland CA
    I have a Grandma. I use it mostly to decouple it from the floor so that it doesn't transmit into other rooms in the house. I am not sure what exactly you are trying to dampen. If you want to dampen the sound of the cab itself, you can add plain old fiberglass home insulation to different parts of the cab interion until you get what you want. It will effect frequency response to a somewhat lower frequency but it will also be a bit quieter.
     
  3. bilbal

    bilbal Member

    Messages:
    8,487
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    Actually Bosstone, I want to do it for the same reason you mentioned - so it won't go into the other rooms in the house through the floor, walls, etc... If it will help in doing that, I will get it as soon as I can. Does it make a huge difference? It is just basically getting it (amp, cab, speaker) off the floor right?

    Thank you Bosstone, you have given me the exact help I was looking for. I appreciate your time and advise. I think it's exactly what I need to do. Changing the space inside the cabinet (adding insulation) is definitely not something I want to fool with because I like the way my Marshall sounds VERY,VERY much.

    B
     
  4. bosstone

    bosstone Member

    Messages:
    3,405
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Location:
    Oakland CA
    Actually, right now it is under the sub-woofer of my son's computer sound system. Yah, it does make a noticeable difference and is well worth the price. I had to go out and buy another one for my amps. I don't know why they are so expensive but I'm glad I have them.
     
  5. RGB

    RGB Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,389
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Location:
    Anthem, AZ
    I never gig without my Gramma!;)

    Really tightens up the low end on a boomy stage, but you could add a clearsonic-type shield to actually reduce volume.
     
  6. rockon1

    rockon1 Member

    Messages:
    11,472
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    Stamford CT
    Stuff it with poly batting you can get at any upholstey store. Comes in batting that looks similar to fibreglass but obviously much more user friendly. Tightens up the bass making it more acurate and less boomy. Love my Lopo oversized 2x12 cab with it. Bob
     
  7. bilbal

    bilbal Member

    Messages:
    8,487
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    I really like the way my Marshall sounds and don't want to change it at all. Will this poly-batting drastically change the tone of the cabinet? What do you mean by "making it more accurate and less boomy"? I like the less boomy part but the more accurate thing confuses me. Sorry for my ignorance. I am leaning toward the Auralex products but I am willing to try all the ideas you guys have given me.

    Bill
     
  8. bilbal

    bilbal Member

    Messages:
    8,487
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    What is the clearsonic-type shiled you are referring to? I'm gonna research "clearsonic" and see what I find.

    Thanks

    Bill
     
  9. bilbal

    bilbal Member

    Messages:
    8,487
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    The clearsonic is exactly what I was thinking it is. That and the Auralex should do the trick I would think.

    Bill
     
  10. rockon1

    rockon1 Member

    Messages:
    11,472
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    Stamford CT
    Well the nice thing about it is if you dont like it there is nothing lost -just take it out!The batting acoustically dampens the cab and tightens up the low end. It barely affects the rest of the sound-everything seems a tighter. Like I said for 20$ and 10 minutes of work theres not much to lose and perhaps a lot to gain sonically.

    Or try the gramma-its not that expensive. Bob
     
  11. saltydogg

    saltydogg Rock & Roll Enthusiast Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,922
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2008
    Location:
    Morris County, NJ
    Rather than start a new thread, I'll give this one a bump.

    I'm entertaining the thought of sound dampening my home studio. It's original design was for office space- not music. It has Pergo wood flooring (with area rugs) and the walls are also wood- painted wains coating to the ceiling. My ceiling is sheetrock and has the 'barn roof' shape. The space is roughly 16'x 20'.

    During jam conditions, there are (2) 4x12 running at the same time along with a bass amp and drum set.

    I'm considering either:
    a) The Auralex GREAT Gramma Isolation Riser under each 4x12
    b) The Auralex 1'x 1'x 2" Studio Foam- installing them like 'crown molding' at the top of the walls- around the perimeter of the room.
    c) Both

    Are there tricks to where and how high the Studio Foam should be installed? Up high? down low?

    What's the best adhesive to use? I understand Liquid Nails is not good for the foam and I see Auralex has a brand but, is there anything else? I don't know that I would want to adhere it to my walls forever (Liquid Nails and alike).

    Now, just like saving money and spending wisely, I have no first hand experience with sound-dampening a room. So, if you studio cat's can lend me some sound advice (pardon the pun) on how to tone-down my jam situation so the picture frames on my shelves will remain standing, I would much appreciate the lessons.

    Thank you.
    John

    Here's an idea of the "current" room design: The side of the room that you can't see is nearly identical- less drum set and gear.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. ylo

    ylo Member

    Messages:
    606
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Location:
    Ashland, MA
    Can you place the instruments firing down the long axis of the room? This would reduce the effect of reflections. If so, then you should put some absorbing material behind and to the sides of the instruments, maybe add some half-height gobos (isolation panels) between the instruments and around the drum area sides. The far end of the room you would leave more or less live for some room ambiance, maybe add some small absorbing panels.

    Next, you would want to reduce beaming reflections off the ceiling and walls with some diffusers, and maybe add some gammas under the 4x12 cabinets for decoupling the floor and some corner bass traps at least at the far end of the wall.

    This involves some trial and error. Use your ears at each step to see whether the sound of the room has gotten better, and stop before going overboard.

    Yes, this can get expensive. Do a web search and look for do-it-yourself projects. Some of these things can be constructed cheap using two-by-fours, fiberglass batting & fabric (for gobos) and discarded styrofoam packaging blocks (which come in lots of odd sizes) for diffusers, for example. You can also make diffusers with odd shapes and sizes out of small wood blocks or slats glued together at random.

    I'm not an expert, but have a background in physics, some acoustics courses under my belt, and some time spent reading about this stuff in the magazines and on the web. The above is what I'm planning to try with my home studio to save some money.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2010

Share This Page