Sourdough bread

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by billbixby, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. winterblu

    winterblu Supporting Member

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  2. daa2202

    daa2202 Silver Supporting Member

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    I love it, but unfortunately the stuff you get outside the San Francisco Bay area just doesn't have much "sour" taste.

    The local Safeway's in-store bakery's is about the best I've had around here - but they do a good job on almost everything I've tried.
     
  3. amptex

    amptex Vendor

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    DYI sourdough-er here. I use a Romertopf terra cotta clay baking vessel, and I use a "no-knead" method. The dough rises while I'm at work.

    Flour, water, starter, salt. Just the way it should be.

    Biggest chore with this is the twice-daily starter feedings. But it's worth it.

    As an SF native, I tend toward extra-sour.

    Here's the final product -

    [​IMG]
     
  4. kkregsg

    kkregsg Member

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    Yes, I bake my own among other types. Taking care of a live starter can be like having a spare child sometimes. King Arthur sells a good live sourdough starter, and I use their bread flour. Another source of a free dry starter is here: http://carlsfriends.net/source.html. I haven't reanimated that one yet. Different starters will have different flavors due to local yeast strains.

    Even if I don't use the sourdough, I always bake in my dutch oven with great results. Any pot with a lid that can take the 450 degree oven will work. You may want to use parchment to help moved the raised loaf into the pre-heated pot. And in place of an expensive baking stones, check with some tile stored for plain unglazed terra cotta tiles. I use 4 6" tiles, but if you can find larger, you can use them for pizza.
     
  5. Teleplayer

    Teleplayer New Mods On The Block Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Buy a $4 loaf at the store, and get your pedal too.
     
  6. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    I used to do it a lot at one point. Sometimes made risen bread, more often simple sourdough biscuits, which were instantly gobbled up by anyone within range. Excellent tasting stuff!
    MD
     
  7. DetSlicker

    DetSlicker Member

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    Check at Aldi. I got one there for 5 or 10 bucks, and it came with a pizza cutter and cooling rack.
     
  8. BlueHeaven

    BlueHeaven Member

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    I LOVE sourdough bread! Local bakery makes legit sourdough and it's pretty much the only kind I eat.
     
  9. gottabetweed

    gottabetweed Member

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    I LOVE to cook, but never had an interest in baking.
    Extreme caution must be taken regarding quantities, humidity, temperature, what kind of mood your flour is in, etc.
    Somethings are just to cheap and easy to buy.
    I put bread in that category.
    The same reason I quit brewing my own beer.
     
  10. Hefalump

    Hefalump Member

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    I am really good with Dutch Ovens.....
     
  11. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    I have a weakness for fresh sourdough rolls with Laughing Cow Cheese Wedges.
     
  12. JWDubois

    JWDubois Member

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    My wife had one of those counter top bread machines. She did sourdough a few times. It was pretty good, but not significantly better or worse than fresh grocery store sourdough.

    I do like a good sourdough bread.
     
  13. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I like to cook, but when I tried bread the first time, sourdough, it wasn't as critical as I read about or you mention here. I've made sourdough in the middle of hot summer, middle of winter in a fairly cold house. Humidity all from dry to high. Quantities were never a problem, and I ignored the stressed advice to use same weight amount of water as flour...just add water til it seems right.

    I've had one bad batch I tried to rush and knew I had a chance of not having come out...and I forgot to let it continue baking after baking time was over, with door open, so it was kinda doughy.

    I have no special bowls, ovens, or anything. It just works, it's just a good deal of time waiting for rise, etc.
     
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  14. bayAreaDude

    bayAreaDude Member

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    I love to cook, but don't do much baking. Sourdough is worth it though. It doesn't have to be nearly as difficult as all those steps. Really, the most important thing is to proof your loaves in the right temperature range for the right amount of time. As far as a starter goes, I'd HIGHLY recommend getting a culture to start with from somewhere like here http://www.sourdo.com/our-sourdough-cultures-2/ . I have three starters I've kept in mason jars for over 10 years - a SF style one, once from some old ass boulangerie in France and a Bedouin one - all make quite different bread with the same technique.
     
  15. jamester

    jamester Silver Supporting Member

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    Cooking and baking are opposite disciplines, I've found that most people usually gravitate towards one or the other. I'm definitely a cook. I always say, cooking is jazz and baking is classical. I went through a period of being fascinated with yeast and dough (mainly for pizza purposes), but otherwise I get no joy from baking, other than consuming the results!
     
  16. billbixby

    billbixby Member

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    Looking good so far

    Day 3

    [​IMG]

    Ordered this as well.

    [​IMG]

    I'm making sourdough bread dammit. I don't care how many times I have to try. This is gonna eat at me till I have a good LOFE <<< Yeah, that's how I spell it :bitch
     
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  17. oldlefty

    oldlefty Member

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    Well this is timely! I made sourdough many years ago and just got the bug again. Made my first recent loaf last week:

    [​IMG]

    Got the starter on Esty, from the original Paresian Bakery in SF, but Etsy has a ton of starters and other sourdough "stuff".

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/198226967/authentic-san-francisco-sourdough?ref=related-0

    It seems like a l-o-n-g process, but once you do it a few times it gets pretty routine.

    Nothing like a toasted slice with butter! Yum.
     
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  18. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I had made six loaves two weeks ago. The only thing, when I am not in baking mode, I leave my (two so far, two jars) starter in the refrig.
    I tended always to try and feed them once a week, usually on the weekend. It's always been ok, the starters are now about 1.5 years old, and REALLY starting to "come into their own" as far as taste, and ease of use. I was in italy in the summer, in a restaurant got to talking to the waiter about sourdough (they had some and i asked about it) and he told me that, that it takes about two years before the starter really starts getting exceptional.
    Anyway, so I was kind of "fed up" (pardon the pun) with sourdough and had other things going on in the weekends. It's been a little over two weeks since. Lots of "liquid" on the top of the starters, I drained, and then fed both, let them sit overnight. Not much (any) rising now. Hope I didn't wait too long. Am going to try reviving, feed them a few times tonight and tomorrow see if I get a rise.

    That is really the only drawback, the attention the starter needs regularly. But it is no biggie, and honestly, I'm no kitchen guru at all, but I don't understand the "Just buy it at the bakery" stuff, but to each his own. For me I REALLY get a kick out of making sourdough. It's fun, and since each culture is a culmination of the bacteria around the area, my sourdough tastes different than store bought bakery sourdough. Hell, the batches taste different from each other. Etc. But I know of NOTHING better than when you go through and finally bake it in the oven, take it out...the smell that fills the house, and that first piece...and the second, still warm.

    Also love it after some days, when you toast it a little. We do buy sourdough from the bakery, but I supplement now and then by baking a bunch of loaves.
    We freeze the extras and when we want a treat thaw and use it. It's really nice. I hope my starter hasn't died though. If it did, I would probably wait a while before making starter again.
     
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  19. smiert spionam

    smiert spionam Member

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    I'm a big fan of good bread, and have been baking for decades. The no-knead dutch oven technique (google NYT Bittman bread for a quick primer) is terrific, and it gets a home baker as close as possible to the crust and texture of loaf from a commercial steam-injected oven. It's also really flexible for different grain mixes, starters, etc. Good stuff.

    All good. But...

    The claims about sourdough solving gluten intolerance are matched only by the magical thinking about gluten intolerance in the first place. For someone who is genuinely celiac, the lower gluten in a sourdough loaf is unlikely to make any meaningful difference. For the vast majority of gluten-free enthusiasts, though, sourdough is probably perfect -- because the symptoms they attribute to gluten likely have little or nothing to do with that particular demonized protein anyway. That's not to say that they're not experiencing some kind of symptoms, or that gluten (or other elements in wheat) might not be a factor in some poorly understood way, but a food that doesn't actually eliminate a particular protein is perfect for people who only imagine themselves to be allergic to it.

    Sourdough is the perfect non-solution to a non-allergy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2016
  20. jimmyj

    jimmyj Member

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    I thought the benefit of sourdough from starter isn't so much the gluten intolerance issue as the lack of a spike in blood sugar that ordinary bread causes.

    BTW, there's a great local breadmaker about an hour from us that makes all his breads from an old family starter. It's wonderful.
    I also get 100% whole grain rye that uses an old starter from Nordic Breads in NY. It's baked by a chef from Finland who is a chef at a NY restaurant and now also bakes traditional Finnish rye bread.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016

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