Speaking of dryness, look at this

NoahL

Member
Messages
1,423
My friend's condo is so bloody dry, her Strat shrunk inside its thick poly skin, and the poly cracked. I scolded her, but now what? Rehydrate and then glue? Glue with what? And goodness, how much tone does this much poly stifle?
 
Last edited:

NoahL

Member
Messages
1,423
I know. It looks like the 50-year-old 5-layer paint that chips off an old baseboard. So thick and hard.
 

NoahL

Member
Messages
1,423
Strip the rest, and oil finish it... That or send it out for a nice respray.
Well, I like the oil idea, but the wood probably looks like a butcher block underneath. It's a Mexi. I think I'll let it rehydrate and then glue it back down with something. The cracks will show, but that'll look cool. The guitar has yellowed nicely from the insane polyurethane.
 

thegoochie

Member
Messages
171
Are you sure its the complete lack of humidity and not that fact that she left it too close to a heat source? To be honest in order for the air to have to have such a dramatic affect on that would through that sort of shell...You have to be in dessert conditions.

I would oil it at this point if the wood is so dried out but not sure if the wood will continue to harden and possibly crack.
 

bob-i

Member
Messages
8,763
I don't believe that's from dry air. I've had 2 MIM strats that I abused to death, totally dry, played in the sun one day, rain the next. The frets sprouted like jacks beanstalk, the truss rod needed so much cranking I was tempted to use a power drill, and the finish never split like that.

I vote factory defect, the finish never bonded with the wood. I'd test to see if it will lay back down on the wood and if that works, wick in some superglue.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
38,714
I vote factory defect, the finish never bonded with the wood.
seconded, i very doubt humidity had anything to do with it.

at this point you might as well peel the rest of it off and refin in some fashion.
 

B. Howard

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,211
Looks like a classic delamination failure. Usual cause is bad prep work but could be bad product as it was likely a catalyzed finish. If she bought it new it may be a warranty issue. But either way a complete strip and re-finish is in order.
 

Keyser Soze

Member
Messages
1,472
seconded, i very doubt humidity had anything to do with it.

at this point you might as well peel the rest of it off and refin in some fashion.
+1

The only upside the that mess is that the rest of the original finish should come off relatively cleanly and easily.
 

NoahL

Member
Messages
1,423
I agree that the coating wasn't well-applied. But this guitar is 9 years old, and we've had the coldest winter in ages here, with forced-air heat going all the time. I'm certain that extreme low humidity combined with sub-par bonding to cause the cracking this winter. Otherwise, why now?
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
38,714
I agree that the coating wasn't well-applied. But this guitar is 9 years old, and we've had the coldest winter in ages here, with forced-air heat going all the time. I'm certain that extreme low humidity combined with sub-par bonding to cause the cracking this winter. Otherwise, why now?
i'm up to my neck in mexi and american standard fenders new and old year-round, and we get cold, dry indoor heat winters too.

i never see that, not even checking.
 




Top