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Speaking of plexiglass panels.........

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by cap'n'crunch, Jun 15, 2005.

  1. cap'n'crunch

    cap'n'crunch Member

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    about how many db's can I expect to cut by putting a p-glass shield in front of my cab? I'm sure we're talking only a couple db's right? Also, if you mic' up your cab do you get some boominess like you would with an isolation cab?

    Thanks. This seems so simple and cheap but, there's got to be a catch otherwise, everyone would be doing it.
     
  2. telewacker

    telewacker Member

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    The trick is to use the four section panel set like a W in front of your cab. The main advantage is that people in front of the amp don't get nailed...the sound is dispersed very evenly and you can move lots of air without becoming overbearing anywhere. I've found the amp still sounds quite natural and if it is close miked with a directional mike like a 57 I don't think there will be any problem with boominess.
     
  3. riverastoasters

    riverastoasters Member

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    Yeah but the people directly ahead in the front rows will thank you.

    The amount of sound you block (and reflect) is determined largely by the mass of the plexiglas. Luckily, plexiglas weighs a lot if you don't use a thin sheet.
     
  4. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    I don't think that's necessarily the case.
    The same product works successfully for thousands of drummers, but not all drummers use it, right?

    Besides, it's much more fun to discuss attenuators, reamping, power scaling, etc., instead of something like a $100 piece of plastic that could accomplish the same thing.
    :D


    I have found a reference that indicates Lexan Thermoclear can provide 19 dB sound insulation (but I'm guessing that's in a controlled test of sound transmission).

    What these panels accomplish is more sound deflection than sound reduction. If you want to get VERY rough idea, test a sheet of plywood or some other material of similar size in front of your cab. Note, like telewacker said, panels at different angles may sound different than a single flat sheet. I've seen guys stick a flight case in front of an amp to deflect the sound successfully.

    I can't think of anyone that's reviewed them that didn't like them, and I'm guessing the fact you can adjust them easily to your needs is one reason why (panel shape, angles, putting panels over the top, etc).
     
  5. telewacker

    telewacker Member

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    I might add that one big advantage to using the plexiglass panels as opposed to attenuators, etc., is the the satisfying low end thunk you get from driving the amp hard and moving some air as opposed to simply reducing the volume of sound from the speakers. The Clear Sonic panels I have are pretty thick and heavy and have flexible soft plastic hinges. It collapses to a 12" x 24" shape that can be strapped to your cab or easily loaded on your cart or hand truck. Plus it looks pretty cool, certainly better than a road case. :D
     
  6. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

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    I've been using a ClearSonic shield for the past several months and really like it. Attenuators are not something I care to deal with, so for the price of the shield, I figured I'd give it a shot. I anticipated a tonal shift that I wouldn't like, but that's not been the case at all.

    For starters, the shield has really cleaned up volume at rehearsals. We rehearse in the live room of our studio, which is a fairly compact space. Previously, I had two choices - kill the boys with my amp, or sacrifice headroom and go with one of my smaller amps. Now I can even use my 2x12 amps at reasonable volume without the mates hating me.

    The next thing I noticed was how much easier it was to hear my backing vocals. I do a slew of harmonies with my pop band, and it's so nice not to be whacked in the back of the head by the amp.

    It really is a great tool for the live thing. Remember, even large venues have front rows! I'll be using the shield later this evening in front of an AC30 at a large outdoor festival. About the only time I don't use the shield is for the really small venues that I work, where stage volume is projected from amps, and no mic'ing is utilized.

    When sound techs see me bring the shield in, it's like they automatically have more respect and are more willing to work with me. No kidding. I guess they appreciate it.

    I can't answer the db reduction question. But as other posters indicated, it's not so much about that, as it is reduction of harsh projection. I also can't compare to attenuators... the last one I used was a Scholz Power Soak, which was what, about 150 years ago?!
     
  7. cr8z4life

    cr8z4life Member

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    I have gone to see Joe Bonamassa twice this year and he plays fairly loud.....he uses the three sided plexi panels and I have to say they work really well in the smaller venues so the guitarist can dial in his amp where he likes it and not kill the people directly in front of him......
     
  8. bluesmostly

    bluesmostly Member

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    I have been using the shield idea for about a year. I see no downside.

    I have had no problem with miking the cab. Sound men love it.

    I love a cranked amp and no one gets bludgeoned, including me.

    I use it in rehearsals and on stage.

    just did a gig on a big outdoor stage for the first time since I started using the shield and thought I would not bother using it cuz there was no one directly in front of the amp (except me). I was wrong.

    I tried all the other ideas for taming volume and I like this the best by far.
     
  9. bluesdoc

    bluesdoc Gold Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I also have the ClearSonic setup. Last time I used it, we were playing a private party in a pretty small room. Really small, actually, for a 5 piece with a loud drummer and bass player. I put the shield up and, as the room was small, I was standing just to the right of my cab and could hear the sound coming up the top. But my wife, maybe 8' in front, could no longer hear me in the mix!! :rolleyes: :eek: Major db cut. I had to fool around with the panel orientation to let just enough sound come through the front to be heard. Amazingly effective stuff!!!

    jon
     
  10. tonemandan

    tonemandan Member

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    Anyone have a link to folks who sell the aforementioned plexiglass panels?

    Dan
     
  11. cap'n'crunch

    cap'n'crunch Member

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    Wow! Thanks to all who replied. I'll definately give it a try now. Thats the only way I'll know for sure if its for me. I have some 1/4" luan plywood scraps that I'll cut up and place in front of my cab for now.
     
  12. aeolian

    aeolian Member

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    I just went to my local Tap Plastics and had them but a couple of pieces for me. Put them together with some strong clear tape and Voila! I made this up so it comes about half way up of the upper speaker in my 2-12. Makes a huge difference in the sound beamed at the folks in front. Side benefit is that the sound spilling out the top goes up at me but doesn't sound like a cab pointed at your ear at close range. So it's easier to hear myself and easier on the front row.
     
  13. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    aeolian brings up a great point. If you want to do your own design, you shouldn't shy away from making your own shield or getting a company that works with plastics/Lexan to help you build one.

    Here's some good pics of Nickcha's own designs for custom shields he built and they show you what's possible (I had to host these because VillagePhoto won't allow linking):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A few more pics here:
    http://www.hamerfanclub.com/memberpages/tonedaddy/Gear/Accessories/Shields/
     

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