Splitting E and A string with OC3 like Gilad Hekselman

roflo

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374
I saw Gilad Hekselman live a couple months ago and it was an amazing concert. I noticed he had special specific wiring that fed his E and A string to the Boss OC3 octave pedal while leaving his 1st -4th strings completely uneffected by the OC3 pedal, giving the sound of deep bass with his E and A string and a regular guitar sound on strings 1-4. Does anyone know how you achieve this split sound setup? I play alot of solo jazz guitar stuff and it would be so beneficial to have the counterpoint of my bass strings have a deep bass sound while having string 1-4 retain a natural guitar sound.
 
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I knew a guy who did this with an old Carvin guitar, though he only isolated the E string

It had stereo output, each pickup fed a separate amp. He had removed the pole pieces under strings ADGBE on the neck pickup and under E on the bridge pickup.


The isolation may not have been perfect, but it warted well.




You could do this with any guitar, as long as you had each pickup on its own output and pulled the policies to achieve the split you want.




The Ripley guitars used Bartolini hex pickups. I don't think they make them, anymore, but they might turn up used. Each string essentially has it's own pickup. There are many ways to wire them. You can wire them to pan pots, like in the Kramer Ripley, or you could do a fixed configuration, such as EA to one amp, DGBE to another, etc.
 

MBT74

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2,466
I thought that the OC-3 was designed so that you could set the threshold so that it only applied the octave down to the lowest two strings. It's one of its party pieces. Andy from PGS does it in his demo I think.
 

jdogric12

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2,526
It would be overkill, but a Roland GR-500/GS-500 will do this. It has a pretty sophisticated bass synth module (for its time - 1978). In the bass section, you can choose strings 1-6, 4-6, or 5-6 (5-6 being E-A). It also has some controls that shape the sound. Each module can be sent to a different output (up to 3 outputs), so it's most common to send the bass to a bass amp.

This guy has a great site about the early Roland guitar synths:

http://www.joness.com/gr300/GR-500.html
 

Double V

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686
the Boss OC-3 can be set where the low E and A strings have the octave down effect, while the D,G, B and E strings remain uneffected. no need for any splitting of output from the guitar.
 

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
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22,763
I saw Gilad Hekselman live a couple months ago and it was an amazing concert. I noticed he had special specific wiring that fed his E and A string to the Boss OC3 octave pedal while leaving his 1st -4th strings completely uneffected by the OC3 pedal, giving the sound of deep bass with his E and A string and a regular guitar sound on strings 1-4. Does anyone know how you achieve this split sound setup? I play alot of solo jazz guitar stuff and it would be so beneficial to have the counterpoint of my bass strings have a deep bass sound while having string 1-4 retain a natural guitar sound.
The two ways I've seen this done is with a GK-compatible pickup, where there's six outputs into a 13-pin cable, or with a conventional magnetic pickup that only reads the low two strings, and which has a separate output. There's usually some degree of crosstalk between the A and the D string, but it's usable. Look at Charlie Hunter's various guitars for examples of splitting two or three strings to a bass amp.
 

quilsaw

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1,130
The OC3 does have a passably good Low Pass Filter function, and a passably good polyphonic "track" record. I prefer to split the signal for separate processing, often as not, giving it further LPF with some measure of natural (direct) signal mixed in. Like most such FX, the "octave only" sound is not very natural.

The GK route does have certain advantages, notably the use of MIDI/synth instruments, which can sound, in isolation, more like a standalone bass (of any flavor). But, IMO, that adds a lot more complication and I don't often feel inspired to do it. That said, I think the GK pickup tracks pretty well.

Though I've not tried it, I sort of like the split pickup/stereo idea, but it would, again, benefit from splitting the two signals for separate processing. The only real advantage would be that it would offer true isolation and, thus, would be better than the built-in LPF, which would be nice.
 

markjsmith

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There is a guitarist Stephen King (not the author) who does the same thing. IIRC it said something on his site about how he does it!
 

roflo

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374
Here is a good example of what I am talking about. There are a few close ups to show the harness wiring. Not a 100% sure if that harness wiring pertain to the string split setup with OC3 but I am assuming it does. Any more thoughts or guess how to achieve this setup.

 

Flyin' Brian

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30,130
the Boss OC-3 can be set where the low E and A strings have the octave down effect, while the D,G, B and E strings remain uneffected. no need for any splitting of output from the guitar.
This is the answer right here. No need to get more complicated.
 

roflo

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374
This is the answer right here. No need to get more complicated.
I have an OC2 and I am assumming that pedal doesn't have that capability? So if i get an OC3, its that easy to seperate having the octave down be applied to only the E and A string. So no additional wiring is nescasary. Has anyone who actually have an OC3 done this and does it ever miss
trigger or does it do a fairly good job of isolating just the E and A string for lower octave bass sound.
What else is on the market that can do this with a more authentic reproduction of an octave down upright bass sound while isolated the E and A string leaving the top 4 strings uneffective.
 

quilsaw

Member
Messages
1,130
I have an OC2 and I am assumming that pedal doesn't have that capability? So if i get an OC3, its that easy to seperate having the octave down be applied to only the E and A string. So no additional wiring is nescasary. Has anyone who actually have an OC3 done this and does it ever miss
trigger or does it do a fairly good job of isolating just the E and A string for lower octave bass sound.
What else is on the market that can do this with a more authentic reproduction of an octave down upright bass sound while isolated the E and A string leaving the top 4 strings uneffective.
It's a low pass filter...it doesn't isolate the strings, it simply filters notes above the threshold set. Not sure how steep the filter is...maybe someone else might...but, yes, it's fairly effective. I set it somewhere in the vicinity of D3 (open D string) or a bit lower.
 

Double V

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686
@roflo

watch from 2:00 - 4:53


I have an OC2 and I am assumming that pedal doesn't have that capability? So if i get an OC3, its that easy to seperate having the octave down be applied to only the E and A string. So no additional wiring is nescasary. Has anyone who actually have an OC3 done this and does it ever miss
trigger or does it do a fairly good job of isolating just the E and A string for lower octave bass sound..
 

jazzgtrl4

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,169
Gilad also has a synth pickup of some sort on his guitar, hooked up to the saddles?. not sure if he using that as well? his guitar has another quarter inch jack that he plugs into. He doesn use a guitar synth. I just saw Gilad a few months back.
 

WahmBoomAh

World Crass Guitarist
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Tal Farlow was a bit of an inventor and he carried a stool around with a foot pedal built into it where he flew in a nice octave below when the bass player would solo. I used to see him at Zinno`s in NY in the 80`s into the early 90`s and I`ll never forget it. Anyone know how he did it ?
 
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The POG(at least the large box one) also has a filter.

Come to think of it, I used to use it to lessen the effects of the pedal on the higher strings, but with the amount of gain I was using, it wasn't perfect.
 

guitarjazz

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21,873
The closest I personally am aware of, is the Kramer Ripley guitar. There's some history there, and I don't remember it, but a google search will reveal all. Basically all 6 strings have an output (and even individual volume knobs), and there's a little mixer module (or something) that you need.

I'm watching one on ebay right now, they pop up a few times a year. Its a fun idea.
Oh man, I saw Ripley at the NAMM show before the Kramer hook-up. Best stereo guitar I've ever heard. Strings panned alternately left-right.
 
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As it has been stated above, the OC3 does this effect on its own. There is no need for special wiring. The additional wiring on his Victor Baker guitar is for his synth pickup.
 




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