Stand-Alone Recorder Help Please

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by RokJok, Sep 1, 2008.

  1. RokJok

    RokJok Member

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    I am attempting to move towards a stand-alone recording unit. Must have 8 ins to record at once and must have at least 16 tracks (all i can really justify funding). But first, I have a stupid n00b question about stand-alones. Can each input be recorded to its own separate track while simultaneously recording. I.E., 8 in, 8 record at once but each of the 8 recorded on its own separate track. Please forgive if this question is below the minimum S-A Recording IQ. But I will risk life, limb and public humility to find out. :worried

    I'm mulling over a Boss BR-1600 and a Yamaha AW1600. Both are at the top end of my budget and both can do the work from scratch to finished CD, sans computer.
     
  2. peridot1

    peridot1 Member

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    Yes, each input will go on it's own seperate track if you record 8 tracks simultaneously.

    I have the AW1600 and love it. You can go either way on the BR1600 or AW. I didn't buy the Boss cause I didn't need the drum machine or bass sounds, but I hear it's a workhorse.
     
  3. franksguitar

    franksguitar Member

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    My Korg D1600 lets you record 8 at once on a 16 track standalone as most unless you have a firewire interface on computer. My Analog 16 track Tascam MRS-16 1/2" reel to reel can record 16 channels at once and no latency issues!
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2008
  4. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    Another vote for the Yamaha. 2 decent fx engines, 4 band EQ per track, dynamics library, OK preamps and somewhat intuitive layout. Editing is a bit cumbersome but if you don't plan to do tons of editing it's pretty simple. You can always convert to WAV files and dump it to the computer for editing in a chosen program.

    And I like Yamaha in general. They make good, durable gear. I've had my AW for about 4 years with not one issue.
     
  5. Rusty G.

    Rusty G. Member

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    I would like to offer something different. I cut my teeth on home recording on the Roland VS1680. Stand alone unit with pretty decent built in DSP (Digital Signal Processing--reverb, limiters, compressors, plus pretty neat modeling of amps, etc.).

    Now, none of these units mentioned have nice pre-amps or converters, so you might not be able to sound like a top end studio. . .but they're pretty good for arranging songs and cutting your teeth on recording. You know, what we think sounds good in our head, or when jamming with friends, might not sound so good once it's committed to disc, and using one of these units is a good way to learn.

    One final suggestion. . .check out Ebay for the best prices. These units are pretty cheap when buying used.

    Good luck!
     
  6. RokJok

    RokJok Member

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    This is GOOD to hear! My thoughts were when recording w/all 8 inputs in use and say the guitar player (notice i didn't say guitarist) screws up, then all that is needed is to redo the one track/one instrument. This was my major concern before going to 8 simuls. Otherwise I could simply go w/2 simul inputs from a mixer, which I already have. I can do that, and do, into the computer as of now.

    I have heard stuff done w/both the Boss and Yamaha. The Yamaha sounded a bit better to my ears for a finished product. Not by much though. Maybe it was the 24 bit headroom advantage? I'm not sure. I'm kinda leaning towards Boss for the drums and being a bit more user friendly. But I can get a Yamaha cheaper. Decisions decisions. :confused:

    Thanks gents. It's not often we get the answers we want to hear. Makes the decision process easier to deal with.
     
  7. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    Just a note on the Yamaha. You can only use 24 bit if you plan on using only 8 tracks. More than that requires you to go to 16 bit. I suppose you might be able to bounce down and add tracks within the 8 track limit bit I don't bother. 16 bit sounds fine and I believe it gets dithered down to 16 when you burn a CD anyhow.
     
  8. peridot1

    peridot1 Member

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    What's good also about the yamaha is you don't have to give up 2 tracks for final mixdown like most recorders. The master fader is actually called a stereo track: it acts as a master fader but you record your finish there as well.
     
  9. RokJok

    RokJok Member

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    Good point. That's the way I understood it..... 16/44 = CD quality.
     
  10. stump

    stump Member

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    I've got the Boss BR 1600CD, worked with the Tascam 2488 and the Yamaha AW 1600. They all work very well. I chose the Boss for the 8 XLR inputs, 8 separate track compressors, 8 track simultaneous recording, 256 Virtual tracks, typical Boss quality and reliability, Bass, Loop and Drum tracks and USB to PC file transfer and the list goes on. All of the units give you a real nice finished product. I think the Tascam is probably the "best bang for the buck" at about $700.
     

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