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Steel Panther bass player Lexxi Foxx quits band

sev_reed

Member
Messages
225
Reading through the comments, there seems to be a lot of confusion about who/what SP are. My guess is that a lot of this has to do with people being very late to the scene. I can see how someone who has just heard about the band might misconstrue SP to be some kind of naughty Weird Al Yankovich. However, for about a decade, SP (as Metal Shop/Metal Skool) played only covers during their live shows. So, they had the same kind 80s hard rock tribute band that so many of the rest of us have rocked.

During that time, they gradually developed a stage act that literally ruled the scene, obviously based on Tap. It developed into tried-and-true antics, jokes, and showcased their impressive ability to completely slip into character with a pro comedic timing in the delivery of their lines.

When i say "ruled the scene", I mean like sold out shows every Monday (yes, Monday) night at places like the Roxy and Key Club in Hollywood. Sold out, meaning with a line around the corner until well after midnight. Who of us would not want that? Sure, their humor is pretty blue, but they can keep an audience's rapt attention for 90+ minutes. Their act was such a hit that they only got through like 7-8 songs in a 90 minute set since their banter filled so much of the time so well. I don't understand comments like "they're schtick gets old." It's just like Seinfeld, or Steve Martin, or Marc Maron taking their roughly complletly worked out comedy set on the road. You go to their show, you watch, and you get on with your life. Before you make up your mind about SP, you.need.to.see.them.live.

Throughout the 2000s, they did the covers/sold-out-shows week in and week out... in Hollywood, and at a few Hard Rock venues... 3 times per week, for years. Probably brought in upwards of $2M per year between the three venues. And with a fkn covers band! They didn't even do any original music until practically a decade after playing together, and I remember when they first introduced Fat Girl. Probably later got offered the opportunity to record some live music by some producer; but the original stuff is all gravy. Extra income to bolster their live act revenue... gravy. They've now parlayed that original music into something they can take on the road, with appearances at festivals, opening for uhm "real bands", and ultimately playing pretty serious venues as headliners.

These guys are a success story.
 

Rumors of War

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,134
I've said this before, but I saw them a few years ago. The jokes were funny for twenty minutes and then it was the same recycled humor. I gave them another 20 minutes to see if some new "material" would be introduced; it wasn't so I left. Their songs are great and I wish they had played more of them because, as I said, the stage "banter" got worn out quick.

They are phenomenal musicians and their songwriting is top-notch. If they interspersed the 20 minutes of banter with more rocking it would serve them better.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,939
Reading through the comments, there seems to be a lot of confusion about who/what SP are. My guess is that a lot of this has to do with people being very late to the scene. I can see how someone who has just heard about the band might misconstrue SP to be some kind of naughty Weird Al Yankovich. However, for about a decade, SP (as Metal Shop/Metal Skool) played only covers during their live shows. So, they had the same kind 80s hard rock tribute band that so many of the rest of us have rocked.

During that time, they gradually developed a stage act that literally ruled the scene, obviously based on Tap. It developed into tried-and-true antics, jokes, and showcased their impressive ability to completely slip into character with a pro comedic timing in the delivery of their lines.

When i say "ruled the scene", I mean like sold out shows every Monday (yes, Monday) night at places like the Roxy and Key Club in Hollywood. Sold out, meaning with a line around the corner until well after midnight. Who of us would not want that? Sure, their humor is pretty blue, but they can keep an audience's rapt attention for 90+ minutes. Their act was such a hit that they only got through like 7-8 songs in a 90 minute set since their banter filled so much of the time so well. I don't understand comments like "they're schtick gets old." It's just like Seinfeld, or Steve Martin, or Marc Maron taking their roughly complletly worked out comedy set on the road. You go to their show, you watch, and you get on with your life. Before you make up your mind about SP, you.need.to.see.them.live.

Throughout the 2000s, they did the covers/sold-out-shows week in and week out... in Hollywood, and at a few Hard Rock venues... 3 times per week, for years. Probably brought in upwards of $2M per year between the three venues. And with a fkn covers band! They didn't even do any original music until practically a decade after playing together, and I remember when they first introduced Fat Girl. Probably later got offered the opportunity to record some live music by some producer; but the original stuff is all gravy. Extra income to bolster their live act revenue... gravy. They've now parlayed that original music into something they can take on the road, with appearances at festivals, opening for uhm "real bands", and ultimately playing pretty serious venues as headliners.

These guys are a success story.
That’s informative and well said; thanks.

Good on them for all the effort. Must’ve been a long road.

Not my cup of tea, personally.

I find the Spinal Tap comparisons inevitable but also a bit of a stretch. Christopher Guest and crew are tier one improv comedians who’ve produced some really amazing improv satire on several topics now; not just hair metal. Feels like apples and oranges to me.
 

RC Mike

Member
Messages
510
He’s not wrong. It was funny for a minute. That was five minutes ago. Now it’s like the band that was joking has become the joke. They’re talented. No doubt about that. It’s just time to hang up the spandex. Maybe do some original non-joke metal. I’m sure they’d kill it.
So you’re ready for them to move beyond the glam and maybe toss on some leather? Get a biker shtick going? I remember when Motley Crue did that.
 

sev_reed

Member
Messages
225
That’s informative and well said; thanks.

Good on them for all the effort. Must’ve been a long road.

Not my cup of tea, personally.

I find the Spinal Tap comparisons inevitable but also a bit of a stretch. Christopher Guest and crew are tier one improv comedians who’ve produced some really amazing improv satire on several topics now; not just hair metal. Feels like apples and oranges to me.
Cheers, and all good. I own and dig those flicks (Tap, Mighty Wind, Best in Show...). While I think SP are Tap-like, they are indeed not like Tap. There is definitely a different approach involved in film vs live performance. SP shows are rawer and crasser... more skin. They create a scene that blurs the line between caricature and reality. I stand behind the strength of the honed skill of the SP guys though. Youtube videos totally miss this, by and large. Gotta see them live to appreciate it.

I might counter and say SP vs Tap is a bit like comparing Empire apples to Fiji apples rather than apples to oranges, but your point is well taken. Admittedly, one would probably not appreciate Steel Panther if they didn't already have a special place in their heart for hair metal, which isn't necessarily the case with someone who watches Spinal Tap.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,939
Cheers, and all good. I own and dig those flicks (Tap, Mighty Wind, Best in Show...). While I think SP are Tap-like, they are indeed not like Tap. There is definitely a different approach involved in film vs live performance. SP shows are rawer and crasser... more skin. They create a scene that blurs the line between caricature and reality. I stand behind the strength of the honed skill of the SP guys though. Youtube videos totally miss this, by and large. Gotta see them live to appreciate it.

I might counter and say SP vs Tap is a bit like comparing Empire apples to Fiji apples rather than apples to oranges, but your point is well taken. Admittedly, one would probably not appreciate Steel Panther if they didn't already have a special place in their heart for hair metal, which isn't necessarily the case with someone who watches Spinal Tap.
Well said; good discussion.

FWIW, I shared a bill at the Whisky with a couple of the SP guys way back when they were doing the Atomic Punks thing. They were phenomenal.
 

sev_reed

Member
Messages
225
Well said; good discussion.

FWIW, I shared a bill at the Whisky with a couple of the SP guys way back when they were doing the Atomic Punks thing. They were phenomenal.
Agreed. Was too bad that Saenz couldn't balance both gigs. And GIT lost a good instructor when Russ left.
 

CJReaper

Member
Messages
2,106
Admittedly, one would probably not appreciate Steel Panther if they didn't already have a special place in their heart for hair metal, which isn't necessarily the case with someone who watches Spinal Tap.
Ironically I like Steel Panther because I DESPISE "Hair Bands", lol! They do such a brilliant job of mocking a genre that I can't stand plus it's nice to hear some good musicianship. I was in High School when the Hair Bands were popular and it was hard to find girls to date that didn't listen to it so I had to begrudgingly sit through a lot of it if I wanted "hook up", damn hormones!
 

A-Bone

Montonero, MOY, Multitudes
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
102,869
I was in High School when the Hair Bands were popular and it was hard to find girls to date that didn't listen to it so I had to begrudgingly sit through a lot of it if I wanted "hook up", damn hormones!
I'm sure this had something to do with geography and peer group and all, but I was likewise in high school during the glam metal heyday (in my case, 85-89), and I don't think I knew any girls who preferred to listen to that music.
 

CJReaper

Member
Messages
2,106
I'm sure this had something to do with geography and peer group and all, but I was likewise in high school during the glam metal heyday (in my case, 85-89), and I don't think I knew any girls who preferred to listen to that music.
I was in Southern California so...
 

Muffdriver

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
778
Might have started out stale.
See, here's the thing. If you really like 80's hair metal music how is that type of music supposed to ever really come back - sincerely?
I never liked hair metal but I think part of the reason rock has fallen so steeply in popularity is because it's just not as much fun as other genres and the artists take things too seriously too often. Steel Panther doesn't. And that makes it refreshing even if - yeah it's the same rehashed jokes about snorting p***y and pounding cocaine or whatever.
 

Strummerfan

Member
Messages
3,186
See, here's the thing. If you really like 80's hair metal music how is that type of music supposed to ever really come back - sincerely?
I never liked hair metal but I think part of the reason rock has fallen so steeply in popularity is because it's just not as much fun as other genres and the artists take things too seriously too often. Steel Panther doesn't. And that makes it refreshing even if - yeah it's the same rehashed jokes about snorting p***y and pounding cocaine or whatever.
I get your point as far as rock taking itself too seriously, but hair metal was truly a satire of itself even in it's prime. When a lyric like "sweet little baby she's my hot dog buns" gets put on record, we don't need a satire, it already is. Not to mention the plethora of songs that are based on telling us how hard they are going to rock us (I'm looking at you, Motley Crue, as well as many others). It was stupid when Queen did it, and even stupider when repeated by the hair generation. I get that music doesn't have to be humorless, but vapid isn't an improvement.
 

Whiskeyrebel

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
30,672
That's a matter of opinion, of course. I thought the first two albums were pretty fun, and they put on a good live show for sure



Absolutely. The whole band are killer musicians, and are tight as hell.

They have all been working musicians since the 90s, so it's a sad comment on the industry that they only found success with a parody act.
Could be worse. At least they didn't strike it big by becoming an act for preschoolers.

Look at it this way- Weird Al has had the same band members for almost 40 years, apart from the "new guy" who joined a mere 30 years ago. So performing with the intent of giving the audience a laugh must provide some sort of career satisfaction.
 






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