Stereo Guitar into 2 Channel Amp

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by sausagemahoney, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. sausagemahoney

    sausagemahoney Member

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    I've never had the opportunity to play around with a stereo guitar, and I was wondering if anyone has tried running the pickups into different channels on a two channel amp. I have a Ceriatone DC30 and an Ibanez Artstar with WCR pickups that I've considered converting to stereo. I have an AB switch to switch between channels if I wanted, but I want to know how it would sound with the pickups running into parallel preamps.
     
  2. crzyfngers

    crzyfngers Member

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    it's still only one amp. you need 2 power amps and 2 cabs to enjoy the stereo goodness.
     
  3. sausagemahoney

    sausagemahoney Member

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    I have another KJL Companion head with another cab, too. I was just thinking of how convenient it would be to have separate voiced preamps for the pickups if I didn't want to haul around 2 amps
     
  4. crzyfngers

    crzyfngers Member

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    i don't know what kind of separation you have on the guitar. one pickup left, one right. top3 strings left, bottom3 right. maybe a ripley type. it'll work, i just don't know how it'll sound. i've never tried.
     
  5. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    Most stereo guitars are simply neck pickup to one output, bridge to the other. Sure, you can run them into two different channels on a two channel amp. With a Fender with reverb the two channels are out of phase, so you'd want to do something to change the phase of one side. Most other amps are in phase. The big advantage is being able to set the EQ (and any effects you want) differently between the two sides. That said, I'm not sure what a person would want to do: EQ so the two sound closer together or more different? Using two separate amps to get stereo spread would be OK, but a lot more interesting with some time based effects in there (such as a stereo panner and running the two pickups into the two inputs). Anyway, try it and let us know how it works out? The other thing that you could do for "stereo" would be to install a piezo bridge and have one channel for the electric pickups and one for piezo...
     
  6. treeofpain

    treeofpain Member

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    With one amp and mono output, you won't get much of a difference. With a true stereo amp, you'll get a bit more. With 2 amps separated from each other - one on each side of you, you'll get the best effect.

    To illustrate this principle, take your stereo speakers for your computer and put them right next to each other, then spread them out - one on each side. Much better, right?
     
  7. Doodad

    Doodad Member

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    I used to work my Ric like this, but in different amps. Does not achieve much on a two channel amp. But, with two amps set completely different and using the blender knob to switch it was cool. One clean amp on the bridge and a dirty amp on the neck was loads of fun.
     
  8. 908SSP

    908SSP Supporting Member

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    All my guitars have stereo out. Piezos to the acoustic amp and humbuckers to the tube amp. You can switch on the guitar from either or both. The combined sound can sound pretty amazing. The mags can have heavy distortion or fuzz while the piezos are clean as a whistle. And with the current acoustic processor pedals the piezos sound amazing.
     

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