Stetsbar question

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by sosomething, Jul 15, 2005.

  1. sosomething

    sosomething Member

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    In da NAP liss!
  2. David Myka

    David Myka Gold Supporting Member

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    The Stetsbar was originally designed for retroifitting on LP type guitars where the larger baseplate was needed to fit onto the stop tail post holes. These are still available from Eric. You probably remember something like this:

    [​IMG]

    The newer model is for OEM guitars that are designed to use the Stetsbar from the start. The baseplate simply screws directly onto the top of the guitar and sits underneath the sliding assembly. This new design makes the trem look very sleek:

    [​IMG]

    There are more pictures here.

    I love it and so do my clients that have it on their guitars. Personally it is my favorite trem design by a longshot and Eric Stets is a great guy to work with. If you have a guitar to retrofit or one you designing with a builder give him a call. He can customize them if he doesn't have what you need already.

    ~David
     
  3. Schroeder

    Schroeder Gold Supporting Member

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    Dave,
    I have said in other threads but, your guitar on the Stetsbar site (#22) is STUNNING! Very nice. And nice job on the redesign of the vibrato unit too!
     
  4. baald

    baald Member

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    David - any way you can comment onthe sound vis a vis a hardtail? (i'm thinking that it uses a TOM as part of it, and thatwith your building ex[pertise you would have more experience and more valid opinion about it)

    thanks
    baald
     
  5. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    David,

    Do you know if the OEM stetsbar would be suitable for using with guitars that currently have wraparound tailpieces. I'm fairly certain the original version won't and it looks like a stetsbar would be better than routing the body to put in a more traditional trem. Also, what's the range on the stetsbar like. Is it bigsby-ish, fenderish, or floydish?

    -Austin
     
  6. muddy

    muddy Member

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    that is absolutely gorgeous, david! but i think i've already told you so. tell me. the oem is simply the stock stets minus the border plate, am i right? that would look SO bloody great on my '61 reissue les p/sg!!! the look of the original, plus the fact that i've been waiting for a shyway (oops! howzat for a freudian?!!), i mean skyway :D (i just do not envision ever getting one of these. i mean, c'mon, it's been 2 years, it ain't gonna happen unless my name is jeff beck), has kept me from pulling the trigger on the stets. but THIS guitar of dave's is just stunning! i think i've made up my mind. :cool:


    ml
     
  7. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    I can't help but laugh at the baseless enthusiasm/faith that some people will place in something like a Stestbar. The crux of the issue rests squarely on the other side of the guitar. Without straight stringpull and a reduced headstock angle you're simply pissing up a rope.
     
  8. muddy

    muddy Member

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    i'm not sure i understand what you mean re straight stringpull, at least as regards this, matte. headstock, yeah, of course. but the nearest to a "straight pull" would probably only be afforded by a locking bridge, ala floyd. izzat what you mean? because the unlocked systems that load strings from behind are taking a right angle turn, which is even more that what this stet's seems to be doing. or the skyway, for that matter. as far as i can tell, that's not pulling straight, either. i'm a bit confuselo. :confused: in any event, i certainly couldn't put any blind faith into a unit i've never seen in the flesh. wishful hoping might be more accurate, especially if you've been waiting for a solution for 2-3 years. btw, have you tried one?


    ml
     
  9. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    I'm simply referring to a straight stringpull headstock design. Nothing more. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. muddy

    muddy Member

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    ah yes, of course. i wonder if you can have an sg's headstock reset straight?


    ml
     
  11. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    Absolutely. Just dowel the tuner post holes and redrill. Steinberger Gearless tuners would work perfectly.
     
  12. muddy

    muddy Member

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    MATTE!!!! yer a fekkin' GENE-yes!!!! i could kiss ya! i was thinkin' headstock tilt, when you just meant in a straight line. DOH!!! thanx! :dude


    ml
     
  13. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    Genius? Definitely not. I'm just a guy whose fixated on having a Lester construction guitar with a totally functional and stable non locking(with the exception of the tuners) whammy bar setup.
     
  14. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Somehow that sounds so much better (and more realistic) than my fixation on a pair of Swedish stewardesses and a bottle of Wesson oil... :rolleyes:
     
  15. big mike

    big mike Moderator - EL34 Emeritas Staff Member

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    No offense, I like your's better Dave...of course, looking like me, obsessing about guitars would be much smarter.:D
     
  16. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    You 'n' me both, bro!
     
  17. David Myka

    David Myka Gold Supporting Member

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    Sorry to get back to this so late. The weather has been pretty nice lately. If anyone is familiar with the area I was out in Zoar Valley this weekend. What a gorgeous place!

    Thanks Schroeder. The design process was pretty fun and I learned a lot from Eric workign with him. Very cool guy with a lot of mehcinists experience. Thanks (to all) for the comments as well. I appreciate that!

    This is sort of true. The plate is still there but it is only as big as the it needs to be to anchor the trem to the body. Since the trem mounts directly to the top instead of on the stop tail posts the plate can be much smaller. The look is way better I think, like it is floating on the surface of the guitar.

    Any trem is going to change the sound of the guitar but comparitively speaking this one does not affect it nearly as much as other trems I have used and played. The most obvious difference will be the lack of the trem block and springs (and the spring cavity). This eliminates the routing of a lot of wood between the neck and bridge that can have adverse affects on the tone (same reason longer neck tenons are desireable). It also makes use of smaller, more dense springs that do not resonate within the range of the guitar eliminating the faux reverb effect entirely. Althought the trem slides on top of the base plate (micro bearings take the load) there is a constant downward pressure that keeps these plates in contact. The result is excellent bridge to body contact that is consistent throughout the range of the trem. In my experience I would say that the tone is more similar to a hardtail than a standard trem unit. This is the reason I prefer it (plus I like the look of it).

    Quite true, straight string pull is a must (within 1-2 degrees max). Locking tuners are also a must. The headstock angle has not been as much of an issue with my guitars since I use a wider nut and curve the nut slots over the break angle so the strings do not bind there. On a couple retrofits I have done for Eric the thinner nuts have been a problem and this is definitely exacerbated by the headstock angle.

    I think Eric is working on a retrofit for wraparounds but he doesn't have one yet. --- The range is fenderish. You can easily slack the strings and raise the pitch by a whole tone or so depending on string guage/tension.

    ~David
     

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