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Steve Cropper confirming the music business really doesn't change much...

Papanate

Member
Messages
19,822
From 'The Guitar Magazine' interview a while back - Steve Cropper is talking about
the demise of Stav/Volt Records. I was struck by how much this sounds like the last 15 years.

It was sad, but disc jockeys just weren’t playing our type of music…
they’d moved onto disco. Places were firing bands and hiring DJs.
That’s what the kids were buying and drinking to, so we didn’t
have any choice – and before long singers like Eddie Floyd and
Johnny Taylor had to step aside.’
 

jnovac1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,358
From 'The Guitar Magazine' interview a while back - Steve Cropper is talking about
the demise of Stav/Volt Records. I was struck by how much this sounds like the last 15 years.

It was sad, but disc jockeys just weren’t playing our type of music…

 

Telefunky

Member
Messages
2,751
Except that he's talking about artists being replaced by other artists. Not the same, because today, artists are being replaced by machines. Completely different issue, and one with major societal implications.


For those of you just waking from a 90 year Coma, The "music business" in the past consisted of two rival parties; the 'music', and the 'business'. They needed each other because without production, distribution, and promotion, artists/musicians always struggled and starved. (let's not forget that Van Gogh sold exactly ZERO paintings during his life) This partnership benefited both parties greatly... until now.

In the last 15 years or so, technology has advanced where all pop music can now be completely made by machines, rendering the musician completely obsolete as far as the business interest is concerned. In other words the 'business' faction can now manufacture music on their own with no need of musicians and artists. Which explains why today's "artist" is little more than a model, i.e. a face and a body to sell a prefabricated product, and replaced at a whim. Pop Music is that product. (sorry, Brittney)

Here's the harsh and brutal reality of the music business inside a computerized society: the musician's job gets taken by a computer, and the musician is so brainwashed and stupid he thinks it's "progress".
 
Last edited:
Messages
6,375
In the last 15 years or so, technology has advanced where all pop music can now be completely made by machines, rendering the musician completely obsolete as far as the business interest is concerned. In other words the 'business' faction can now manufacture music on their own with no need of musicians and artists..
Sorry dude, but this completely, utterly wrong.
 

jvin248

Member
Messages
6,436
.

DJs will pass.

Somewhere out there is a little group already playing in a garage, recording direct to Youtube and selling through Amazon downloads -- about to sweep the music scene -- without the music business.

.
 

n9ne

Member
Messages
2,039
Technology has completely changed the landscape...for the better and for worse.

First of all, artists are no longer dependent on major labels for national or worldwide distribution. Every musician now has a means of making his or her music instantly available to the entire world...and it costs the artist only a few dollars.

But the laws of supply and demand still apply. Consumers have a virtually unlimited supply of new music from countless new artists available at their fingertips...which makes it very difficult for a new artist to establish a fan base or separate himself from the pack.

Commercial pop music is fundamentally the same as it has been since day one. It's all about selling a product and maximizing profitability. Technology now allows content to be created and distributed with less overhead and expense than one could have imagined twenty or thirty years ago....but at the end of the day, they're still selling a product.

And as always, the laws of supply vs. demand still rule above all else.
 

rollyfoster

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,193
Except that he's talking about artists being replaced by other artists. Not the same, because today, artists are being replaced by machines. Completely different issue, and one with major societal implications.


For those of you just waking from a 90 year Coma, The "music business" in the past consisted of two rival parties; the 'music', and the 'business'. They needed each other because without production, distribution, and promotion, artists/musicians always struggled and starved. (let's not forget that Van Gogh sold exactly ZERO paintings during his life) This partnership benefited both parties greatly... until now.

In the last 15 years or so, technology has advanced where all pop music can now be completely made by machines, rendering the musician completely obsolete as far as the business interest is concerned. In other words the 'business' faction can now manufacture music on their own with no need of musicians and artists. Which explains why today's "artist" is little more than a model, i.e. a face and a body to sell a prefabricated product, and replaced at a whim. Pop Music is that product. (sorry, Brittney)

Here's the harsh and brutal reality of the music business inside a computerized society: the musician's job gets taken by a computer, and the musician is so brainwashed and stupid he thinks it's "progress".
Leave Britney alone!!!!

 

DRS

Member
Messages
12,514
Except that he's talking about artists being replaced by other artists. Not the same, because today, artists are being replaced by machines. Completely different issue, and one with major societal implications.


For those of you just waking from a 90 year Coma, The "music business" in the past consisted of two rival parties; the 'music', and the 'business'. They needed each other because without production, distribution, and promotion, artists/musicians always struggled and starved. (let's not forget that Van Gogh sold exactly ZERO paintings during his life) This partnership benefited both parties greatly... until now.

In the last 15 years or so, technology has advanced where all pop music can now be completely made by machines, rendering the musician completely obsolete as far as the business interest is concerned. In other words the 'business' faction can now manufacture music on their own with no need of musicians and artists. Which explains why today's "artist" is little more than a model, i.e. a face and a body to sell a prefabricated product, and replaced at a whim. Pop Music is that product. (sorry, Brittney)

Here's the harsh and brutal reality of the music business inside a computerized society: the musician's job gets taken by a computer, and the musician is so brainwashed and stupid he thinks it's "progress".
Please post some examples of music completely made by machines. I abhor much of today's pop music but it's still made by people.
 

Emigre

Senior Member
Messages
4,346
Here's the harsh and brutal reality of the music business inside a computerized society: the musician's job gets taken by a computer, and the musician is so brainwashed and stupid he thinks it's "progress".
There’s still artists creating the music. You betray a fundamental misunderstanding of electronic music, not that I blame you, but pull back a bit on the pronouncements :)

Also keep in mind - as much as we like guitar - that electronic music, even pop, is far more inventive and fresh than tired old licks from the 60s and 70s.
 

Papanate

Member
Messages
19,822
Except that he's talking about artists being replaced by other artists.
Places were firing bands and hiring DJs.

Here's the harsh and brutal reality of the music business inside a computerized society:
the musician's job gets taken by a computer, and the musician is so brainwashed and
stupid he thinks it's "progress".
That's wrong. Nobody goes to a stadium to watch a computer.
 

StuRdesign

Member
Messages
1,977
Cropper was talking about way back when; but one place a musician will never be replaced is the live setting; which existed long before the music and recording industry did. That's where people like Cropper will never be replaced, no matter how much computers are developed.
 

Astronaut FX

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,136
It’s important to remember that composing music and performing music are two different skills, two different tasks. Just because you are able to find examples of performances that appear to be nothing more than “pushing buttons” doesn’t mean that there was not some level of compositional prowess and planning involved.

The style of music may have changed, and may be outside of your personal taste. The emphasis on the performance aspect may be lessened today. But I would disagree with any suggestion that people completely devoid of musical knowledge and/or creativity are using machines to do all of the work.
 




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