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Stick with Switchcraft jacks or give Pure Tone a try?

stratamania

Member
Messages
3,462
@Barnzy sure of course. My view is the Puretone are worth a try. Will I replace all of the jacks on my guitars? Probably not unless something needs replacing and then who knows what I will use will depend on the guitar. :cool:
 

Maguchi

Member
Messages
948
I am about to order some replacement electronics for a partscaster I have and was just wondering about the TGP opinion here. Is the Pure Tone Jack an upgrade worth trying or is Switchcraft the way to go? What are your thoughts and experiences here. What is the current wisdom on pots also if you don’t mind sharing as well. I like quality and don’t mind paying for reliable performance and I have heard CTS are disappointing as of late?
Thanks,
Barnzy
As for pots...I don't have first-hand experience, but I'm very eager to try the Emerson Pro CTS Pots (8% tolerance) from stewmac
Get CTS, but not directly CTS, get the DiMarzio or Emerson version:



Pure-Tone?
why?
Is there something lacking with the Switchcraft?


A simple lock-washer would have fixed that on your OUTPUT jack.
^^^^ This

I have had jacks that have not been touched in decades.
They don't come loose.
but it's not equal; the puretone is obviously a cheap east-asian made jack with a clever gimmick.

now if a real company like switchcraft or neutrik made a version then i might take it seriously

in fact they do, and have for a while, the switchcraft #2T11



you never see them because it's not necessary
I use switchcraft because I have replaced so many cheap jacks that lose their spring temper.
sure, but since the real switchcraft #11 is like $2 i can't see a reason to ever bother with those lesser choices
I've replaced several cheap import guitar's jacks with Switchcraft and been happy with them. I did have one late '80s Washburn with a tight jack cavity with little clearance that I was having trouble with and used a Pure Tone on that and it worked out great. Having had good luck with Switchcraft for the last 30+ years, I'll stick with them for now.

As far as pots I've used regular CTS as well as the Emerson's with 8% tolerance and both have worked great.

You didn't mention caps, but I've found some great sources for quality caps. Since it's only two caps each per guitar, I'll spend a little extra and get the best. Lollar has Luxe caps and I've also used Emerson paper in oil caps from other sources in some guitars. Regular Orange Drop caps work great too.


 
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galibier_un

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,011
In high-end audio, a few manufacturers tout the advantage of minimal connector mass and a point contact for RCA connectors - companies lie ETI, WBT, and KLE.

Their contention about the latter is that it a small mass, point contact sleeve (ground connector) reduces ground loops.

Of course, there are a lot of wacky things going on in this arena (6-nines copper, etc.), but I find it humorous that contentions are 180 degrees opposite of PT's stance.

... Thom
 

Khromo

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,152
I've been using Switchcraft stereo jacks in mono circuits for a while! The extra, "ring" contact provides extra tension, similar to the PT design, in a sturdy, Switchcraft-quality jack! I wire the ground wire to both the ring and sleeve lugs! $2.19 at Parts Express! Me so smott!

Switchcraft 12B 1/4" Stereo Jack Female Panel Mount Double Open Circuit (parts-express.com)

This is the thinking man's solution to this problem, and I believe it should make everyone very, very happy!

I have some customers who put on a pretty "athletic" performance, and the stereo jacks seem to minimize the crackle they get when they start jumping around!

Some day I'm going to break one of these open to see if there is any magic under the red shell! I use them in speaker cabs for the larger solder lugs! $3.79 at Parts Express!

Switchcraft Z15J 1/4" High Power Speaker Jack (parts-express.com)
 
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Messages
1,126
…The extra, "ring" contact provides extra tension, similar to the PT design, in a sturdy, Switchcraft-quality plug. I wire the ground wire to both the ring and sleeve lugs…
Same. Did it first by accident (picked the wrong socket out of the stash), but it worked out well, so have repeated it intentionally.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
34,465
advantage of minimal connector mass and a point contact for RCA connectors
Minimal connector mass MAY reduce capacitance from unhearable to unnoticeable, but RCA jacks do not have a 'point' contact.
Or are you referring to some sort of RCA alternate?
 

galibier_un

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,011
Minimal connector mass MAY reduce capacitance from unhearable to unnoticeable, but RCA jacks do not have a 'point' contact.
Or are you referring to some sort of RCA alternate?
These little fellers from ETI.

Notice the front one. What you'd normally think of as the barrel (ground connector) is a type of composite which supports the small pin that is the actual ground connection.



... Thom
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
39,240
These little fellers from ETI.

Notice the front one. What you'd normally think of as the barrel (ground connector) is a type of composite which supports the small pin that is the actual ground connection.
that's about the dumbest thing i've seen all week

they found a way to sabotage the one big advantage of RCA jacks, namely the large surface contact area. also, since RCAs have no "click" involved, no positive locking connection but are just held by friction, they created a nice setup where the slightest movement of the cable causes it to fail
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
34,465
they found a way to sabotage the one big advantage of RCA jacks, namely the large surface contact area. also, since RCAs have no "click" involved, no positive locking connection but are just held by friction, they created a nice setup where the slightest movement of the cable causes it to fail
The average RCA jack needs to have its plug inserted, squeezed, spun around, just to clean up the contact areas.
These look suitable for some sterile lab where things work undisturbed by real world hazards.
How did they conclude that there was an improvement?
 

galibier_un

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,011
that's about the dumbest thing i've seen all week

they found a way to sabotage the one big advantage of RCA jacks, namely the large surface contact area. also, since RCAs have no "click" involved, no positive locking connection but are just held by friction, they created a nice setup where the slightest movement of the cable causes it to fail
The average RCA jack needs to have its plug inserted, squeezed, spun around, just to clean up the contact areas.
These look suitable for some sterile lab where things work undisturbed by real world hazards.
How did they conclude that there was an improvement?
Yup, it's the difference between gear whose primary design criterion is to withstand torture (guitars, pro sound, etc.) and gear which will be in a fairly "controlled" environment (audiophile/hi-fi).

They both have their place.

I have to tell you, that with the audio interconnects I've designed (using 25/38 nylon served litz), I can "hear" a lower noise floor when using the ETI connectors. You might think I'm mad, but I strongly suspect you'd hear it as well. How much importance you'd ascribe to it is a different question.

I've built audio interconnects using Mogami's microphone cable and they were very, very close in "audio performance" to my litz recipe (measured capacitance was also within a few pFs of the litz).

I know ... litz is designed for skin effect in the gigahertz range. Why I hear the difference ("only" the 3-4 pF/foot difference?) is beyond me, but I seriously doubt that it's due to confirmation bias.

All of this is to say that pro sound gear is very, very good, and given the abuse it's likely to receive, using it for its intended application is a no-brainer.

... Thom
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
39,240
I have to tell you, that with the audio interconnects I've designed (using 25/38 nylon served litz), I can "hear" a lower noise floor when using the ETI connectors.
quick switching box to compare before your auditory memory resets (a few seconds at best)?

double blind test (somebody else doing the switching, neither of you know which is which?)

even better, competition barista champion and youtuber james hoffman's "triangle tests", where you get two of one thing and one of another and see if you can really pick the odd man out?

absent those things i just don't see it
Why I hear the difference...is beyond me, but I seriously doubt that it's due to confirmation bias.
everybody does when it comes to their own experience but that doesn't mean it's not happening
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
34,465
You might think I'm mad, but I strongly suspect you'd hear it as well. How much importance you'd ascribe to it is a different question.
Everybody likes lower floors and higher ceilings.
My tinnitus level is likely higher than the noise floor from even the most modest RCA connector, though.
BTW given the right gear is not the noise level measurable for confirmation?
 

galibier_un

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,011
Everybody likes lower floors and higher ceilings.
My tinnitus level is likely higher than the noise floor from even the most modest RCA connector, though.
BTW given the right gear is not the noise level measurable for confirmation?
I sympathize. I have a sensitive left ear. It's not typical tinnitus symptoms, but I have to be watchful, and am pretty sensitive to amp distortion, so I practice clean to light breakup.

I need to get better measuring tools to quantify what I'm hearing.
quick switching box to compare before your auditory memory resets (a few seconds at best)?

double blind test (somebody else doing the switching, neither of you know which is which?)

even better, competition barista champion and youtuber james hoffman's "triangle tests", where you get two of one thing and one of another and see if you can really pick the odd man out?

absent those things i just don't see it

everybody does when it comes to their own experience but that doesn't mean it's not happening
As far as quick switching is concerned, now we've introduced a new variable - the switch. Given that we're testing connections, I don't think this makes sense.

For a couple of years, I was running a moving coil phono cartridge with a step-up transformer. I had a silver plated switch to change from 1:10 to 1:20.

Upon preparing to sell it, I hard-wired it for 1:10. Hearing the difference (improvement) I was having seller's remorse.

[edit]Confirmation bias alert. I was not expecting a change, and thought that removing it was silly. The only reason I removed the switch was at the request of the buyer.[/edit]

I'm a big fan of long term evaluations, but I have to say, that the Barista test is an interesting one. It reminds me of A/B/A testing. It's the return to the second "A" that usually tells the story.

With long term listening, I think something is occurring cognitively that we don't have a handle on - a learning process where you're mapping the sonic landscape. These are my own musings, and I have no way of proving it.

With guitar electronics, I could care less. My mediocre playing is the biggest variable from day to day :eek:
Congratulations, journeyman, you are now approaching the apex of Overthinking ****.
Care to contribute something instead of sniping?

... Thom
 
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Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
34,465
I bet this will sound great along with my $70 guitar cable
What does one want from a connector?
Sound quality.
Long term conducting reliability.
Great physical feel upon connecting.
Solid, long term mounting.
Easy mounting and soldering terminals that fit the wire in use.
Others?

The Analysis Plus probably ticks those boxes in a better way than other jacks.
If one is selling top line gear and buyers have similar quality criteria, looks count for a lot.
See Bumblebee caps for an example.

Some things are built better but have no practical purpose in common use.
High end guitars would be a good example. Or cars. Or lots of things.
That does not mean they do not work well in their application but just that the performance standards are beyond the needs of the application.
They may even be well worth it to those whose criteria include exact conformance to specific standards even when the task is unrelated.
Sorting out the bang for buck is an ongoing project around here.
 

Derrick111

Member
Messages
70
Switchcraft are super high quality, have never changed from that, and has been the industry standard in the highest quality guitars since the beginning. What about an Asian made jack do you feel that might be of some gain over a Switchcraft? The fit is tight and precise, the durability can't be beat, and the price is fair. The Asian part is overpriced, and I guess some haven't learned about how Asian parts tend to hold up against USA (not a political statement).

All the upgrades to 80s/90s MIJ Fenders have included a Switchcraft jack. I have toured internationally with, and relied on a Les Paul with original Switchcraft jack for 30 years (the guitar is 42) and never a problem. Plug is still very tight! Honestly, I think people just are so restless or self confidant in their gear that they just have to make changes to feel like they made things "better"...
 






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