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Stopbar Tailpiece Rising

Brunooliveira

Member
Messages
82
Hello guys.

So i've a Les paul and never really used....now ive realized this problem.

I'm a 011 guy

What can i do ?

 

MrGibson

Member
Messages
1,032
Those are flanged TP stud bushings found on current Epiphones and some Gibson guitars from the past.

When mounted on a carved top, like an Epi LP, there will be a gap between the body top and the rear side of the flange depending on the bushing insertion angle to the curved top. The gap indicates that the bushing is perpendicular to the back of the guitar (makes drilling easy) and is not (contrary to popular belief) a sign that the bushing is being pulled out from the body.

However, in your case it definitley looks like the bushing is not seated properly. You could try to tap it back in, but it will probably return to that state over time unless you secure it. I would replace them with non-flanged steel bushings that are recessed a hair below the top.

A very high bridge will create a greater pulling force. A very high tailpiece will create a greater torque at the bushing. Those are not ideal situations. If the guitar hasn't been played for a long time, I advice you to do a full set up service.
 
Last edited:

Brunooliveira

Member
Messages
82
Those are flanged TP stud bushings found on current Epiphones and some Gibson guitars from the past.

When mounted on a carved top, like an Epi LP, there will be a gap between the body top and the rear side of the flange depending on the bushing insertion angle to the curved top. The gap indicates that the bushing is perpendicular to the back of the guitar (makes drilling easy) and is not (contrary to popular belief) a sign that the bushing is being pulled out from the body.

However, in your case it definitley looks like the bushing is not seated properly. You could try to tap it back in, but it will probably return to that state over time unless you secure it. I would replace them with non-flanged steel bushings that are recessed a hair below the top.

A very high bridge will create a greater pulling force. A very high tailpiece will create a greater torque at the bushing. Those are not ideal situations. If the guitar hasn't been played for a long time, I advice you to do a full set up service.

Thank you!

I tapped a lot of times...and continued to go out...

I will then take to a professional ...
 

RicOkc

Member
Messages
2,327
Pull out the bushing and use some titebond epoxy in the cavity and replace the bushing. Chances are you'll never have that problem again.
 




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