Strat pricing

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by oneidabow1, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. oneidabow1

    oneidabow1 Member

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    Whats up with the huge spread in pricing on production American built Strats? Which component makes the difference? They pretty much all have Alder bodies unless you order an ash model, maple necks, 6 tuners, bridge, strings, pickups, pickguard, knobs. I bought an American Special about 3 months ago for 795. Next step up was 999. Other than the pickups and paint color there was no big difference. Now I understand about signature models like Clapton, SRV, Jim Root and such and they need to pay royalties. But come on.
     
  2. Jeremy A

    Jeremy A Member

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    I'd like to know this too! I'm about to buy an American Standard Strat. I know I'm gonna put some new pups in it because I want a warm, thick tone, but are all the other parts on it top notch??
     
  3. dazco

    dazco Member

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    You simply need to understand marketing and the reasoning behind it to realize why pricing is the way it is. And also to understand where the best bargains are. A lot of people don't get that. But it's simple logic. Wood is wood. Fancy wood had zero to do with tone. Luck has everything to do with tone. Use logic and as they say, run the racks. You can have great stuff cheap. Some don't believe that, and they keep the high end lines going. Those gems everyone wants from the 50's and 60's were junk compared to today's mid range stuff. The are aged which is great and important. But thats all.
     
  4. mikebu

    mikebu Member

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    American Standard Upgrades:

    Hard Shell Case
    Different pickups
    2 point tremolo with better block
    Micro-tilt neck adjust and biflex truss rod
    tone control for middle pickup shared with bridge pickup

    Is that worth the extra $200 maybe...
     
  5. janosfia

    janosfia Member

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    Different finish on the body/neck, too. Better or worse is a matter of personal preference, but the finish on the American Standard does cost more to do than the finish on the American Special.
     
  6. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    I believe it.
    I prefer Squier strats, for their overall workmanship and for the wood they use in the necks.
    I gigged friday night with an AXL guitar that is similar to a tele, I paid 130 bucks for it new. It is mint green and has a very retro look to it.
    The EMG designed pickups it came with weren't to my liking, so I routed a humbuck hole in it and put a generic humbuck in it and some kind of rail pickup in the bridge.
    I get a ton of compliments , I have even had a few musicians ask me if it is some special made botique guitar.
    The fretwork is amazing and the thing stays in tune and keeps a setup , even when being gigged a lot in the cold season.
     
  7. Kelly

    Kelly Member

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    One of the best posts Ive ever read here.
     
  8. djg714

    djg714 Member

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    The American Std is worth the extra $200 for me.
     
  9. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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    The 'guitar of my choice' is worth the extra $X,XXX for me.
    Explains it all.
    Value is largely subjective, at either end of the scale.
     
  10. Guitarworks

    Guitarworks Member

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    You don't have to buy it if you don't think it's worth it. If you think it's too high, vote with your dollar.

    Consumer perception plays a HUGE role in how prices are determined. Fender's market research dept. does a good job of figuring out:
    *how many people are willing to pay extra money for certain differenes and features.
    *how much extra money they're willing to pay on each individual difference and feature.

    This is why I never fill out the little attached survey/questionnaire for any product I buy, because this is the information they're trying to obtain from me. I tear off that portion and throw it in the trash. I'm not going to help the manufacturer figure out new ways to gouge me in the future. I only fill out the warranty card with the serial number of what I bought, my address, and that's it.
     
  11. SNick

    SNick Member

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    The extra 200 is worth every penny.
     
  12. jsa61

    jsa61 Member

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    When I was looking to but a Strat, I spent a good deal of time at GC playing every one (SSS)they had(MIM and MIA). All were pretty similar except one stood out to me tone wise. That's the one I bought. It happened to be an am. standard, and was not the most expensive. If I hadn't come across this particular guitar, I probably would have gone with a MIM.
     
  13. toomanyamps

    toomanyamps Member

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    And in what possible way could this be true? Is the wood somehow better now? Those 50s and 60s Strats used steel tremolo blocks todays mid-range MIM strats now have cheaper zinc blocks. Do you really think a professional musician (that's who was buying strats then) would spend a couple of weeks salary on something that wasn't set up and frets dressed properly?
     
  14. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    In a way, I like the variety available today with Fender Strats, although it makes choosing the right one a bit harder. With the 50's and 60's guitars, one didn't have much choice if you wanted a new one. Choice of color was about all you got. Today, you can choose neck shape, finger board radius, color, wood type, finish type, different pickups and configurations, different headstock shapes, maple or rosewood finger boards, relic finishes and so on. I guess that's why partscasters are popular, as it's pretty easy to swap parts on Fenders. By Fender have some built in Mexico, they are able to keep the cost down to a degree. The quality suffers a bit in the hardware of the MIM strats usually, but there are some pretty fair players axes MIM. The cost of doing biz in CA drives the cost of MIA strats up, along with the better hardware and including the hardshell case. So I can see why a MIA strat costs more than a MIM strat. If it sounds better and plays better and has a better case and warranty, then it's worth the few hundred dollars more IMO.
     
  15. toomanyamps

    toomanyamps Member

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    The interesting part is the lower line MIAs don't cost more than the premium MIMs.
     
  16. gtraddict

    gtraddict Member

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    My friend bought an American special it is a lot better guitar than the American Deluxe, plugged or unplugged. It sounds and plays better.
    To me I be honest I cannot tell a difference in what Fender is putting out in what factory anymore, quality wise. Which is a good Since my favorite offering are still in the MIM and Classic Vibe for the price
     

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