• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.

Strat Trem Setup Question - Fan Setup?

StratStringSlinger

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,276
My new Strat came with three springs setup in a fan or triangle pattern (middle three hooks on the claw spreading out on the trem block side).

What's the purpose of this setup? I.e. what are the supposed benefits and detractors?

Thanks.
 

ljholland

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,893
I set mine up that way as a repair guy showed it to me years ago. He said that distributed the forces better and kept one side from pulling more than the other.

I tried it both ways and I can't say I notice a difference....but still do it in a "V".
 

Chad

Member
Messages
855
Myself, I don't notice a difference.

Tom Anderson gets quoted in Dan Erlewine's book. He likes the outside two springs angled and "open" (stretched) in the sitting position. If I understand correctly what he is saying, this allows a cushy feel when playing without the bar because there is less resistance with open springs. At the same time, the center spring is doing very little. But once the tremolo is used, the center spring kicks in and adds a level of stiffness that he likes.
 

pipedwho

Member
Messages
1,681
Myself, I don't notice a difference.

Tom Anderson gets quoted in Dan Erlewine's book. He likes the outside two springs angled and "open" (stretched) in the sitting position. If I understand correctly what he is saying, this allows a cushy feel when playing without the bar because there is less resistance with open springs. At the same time, the center spring is doing very little. But once the tremolo is used, the center spring kicks in and adds a level of stiffness that he likes.
This is true as helical springs are slightly stiffer at the very early part of their stretch travel. Once they've been stretched further into their linear spring constant region they are less stiff.

So angling the two outer springs lowers the stiffness for an equivalent tension, making it feel slightly more spongey at the same float angle. Sort of like being able to subtract 1/4 of a spring without getting too soft by going to one whole less spring.

Ie. 2 springs is softer than having 2 angled plus one full. Which is softer than 3 having springs.

Another option is to use 3 or 4 weaker springs (eg. Raw Vintage) in parallel alignment to get the same effect. But, since you've already got the springs and you're mostly there, then you may as well use the angle method to reduce the stiffness to make it 'just right'.
 

StratStringSlinger

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,276
Very interesting. I normally deck my bridge with 5 springs but this new guitar with the fan setup seems to play and sound just great. I like the setup and sound even though it's three springs and floating. I've tried the Raw Vinyage and didn't like it; the tone was changed to much.
 

Chad

Member
Messages
855
Myself, I don't notice a difference.

Tom Anderson gets quoted in Dan Erlewine's book. He likes the outside two springs angled and "open" (stretched) in the sitting position. If I understand correctly what he is saying, this allows a cushy feel when playing without the bar because there is less resistance with open springs. At the same time, the center spring is doing very little. But once the tremolo is used, the center spring kicks in and adds a level of stiffness that he likes.
After thinking about this, I think it boils down to this method makes the guitar play like it has two springs when not using the trem. But while using the trem, it has a feel somewhere between a 2 spring setup and a 3 spring, non-angled setup.....and this in between feel is something he likes.

This makes sense in theory, but I wonder in reality if Tom could actually tell the difference in a double blind test.
 






Trending Topics

Top Bottom