Strat tremolo, how tight on the 6 tremolo screws

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
Wondering if there is a specific torque setting on the 6 tremolo screws?

Any insight appreciated! Thanks in advance!
 

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,483
0 Torque. Have the trem plate decked on the body. Tighten each screw until the plate starts to rise off the body. Back off 1/2 turn or so. Do this for each screw. The screws are just there for the trem plate to ride against, not to tighten it.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,988
in fact, the middle 4 screws should be less than zero torque, they should be lifted up away from the plate by like a half-turn.

the outer two will serve to keep the plate from sliding up and down when you work the trem, so they get tightened down just to the point that the screw head makes contact with the plate, then also get backed off ever so slightly to keep from pinching the plate against the body and inhibiting movement.
 

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
Thanks...I was thinking you needed to start at some tight of very light torque and go from there.

I sometimes use my adjustment on one of my drills to get the torque the same for some applications....it will adjust where it has very little torque and will slip.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
38,146
I sometimes use my adjustment on one of my drills to get the torque the same for some applications....it will adjust where it has very little torque and will slip.
I can't think of any place on a guitar where torque measurements are used.
Everything is between barely snug and don't break it.
 

VaughnC

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
19,047
the best way to deal with those is tear them off & replace them with a 2 point vibrato bridge

007-2253-000-l.jpg
To some of us the 6 point sounds better ;).
 

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
good lord, not on a guitar! :eek:
Apparently you guys have never used some of these adjustable drills, though yes do deliver more torque, my drills apply hardly ANY torque on the lowest setting

For example tightening down the neck screws, the drill will "slip" with the screws finger tight, do you see now?

Im not talking about the tiny screws....I've done this for years and have never EVER stripped out wood threads with an adjustable drill.

Its less dangerous actually than using electric some screwdrivers.
 

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
I can't think of any place on a guitar where torque measurements are used.
Everything is between barely snug and don't break it.
Not the neck to body joints....my adjustable drill set to maximum slippage will barely turn any screw let alone tighten it even finger tight.

It will deliver exact even torque but you adjust the slippage of the drill by starting on the very lowest setting which is not even "barely snug" as you referred.
 

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
why would you make that assumption?

don't use torque settings, even mild ones, on guitars.
The only place I use it is on the neck body screws....you can over-tighten things with your hands as well, especially with a big handled screwdriver.
 

JonSick

Member
Messages
1,462
To some of us the 6 point sounds better ;).
I used to be of this belief until I tried the Wilkinson VS100. The trem of choice on a strat for me - if a floyd rose isn't available.

I wish Fender would do another USA Floyd loaded standard strat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jcs

Laurent Brondel

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,410
in fact, the middle 4 screws should be less than zero torque, they should be lifted up away from the plate by like a half-turn.
Exactly.
What I do sometimes is slightly ream the 4 middle screw holes on the trem plate so that there is zero contact and interference from those screws.
No torque seting for me for that, it should be done by hand with a phillips screwdriver as you want the 2 outer screws to hold the trem plate down to the body so it does not lift up, but not to impede the action of the trem.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jcs

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,988
If there's zero contact then why have the screws there?
supposedly the outer two are strong enough to do the job alone, but i myself like the idea of all six carrying the force and spreading it over a larger volume of wood. after all, the screws may be hardened but the wood is still soft.

i raise up the middle four so that they still support the bridge but the heads don't interfere.
 

burningyen

Member
Messages
15,378
supposedly the outer two are strong enough to do the job alone, but i myself like the idea of all six carrying the force and spreading it over a larger volume of wood. after all, the screws may be hardened but the wood is still soft.

i raise up the middle four so that they still support the bridge but the heads don't interfere.
Yes, it makes sense to have contact with the back of the screw shafts and zero contact with the front, sides and heads.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jcs

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,483
Apparently you guys have never used some of these adjustable drills, though yes do deliver more torque, my drills apply hardly ANY torque on the lowest setting

For example tightening down the neck screws, the drill will "slip" with the screws finger tight, do you see now?

Im not talking about the tiny screws....I've done this for years and have never EVER stripped out wood threads with an adjustable drill.

Its less dangerous actually than using electric some screwdrivers.
I've never had one that the torque/release was sensitive enough that I would use it for guitar work. But only had about half a dozen brands.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jcs

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,483
Regarding the screws, two points define an edge. The main thing is to make sure none of the 6 screw heads interfere with the top of the plate when you use the trem. After that it doesnt really matter if all 6 are the same or just two. As the holes wear, the plate will ride on two, as they wear, it rides elsewhere and settles on the closest ones with zero clearance.
They do wear. I have a Strat 2 point trem here I removed that has huge wear on the plate "knife edge" itself.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jcs

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
I've never had one that the torque/release was sensitive enough that I would use it for guitar work. But only had about half a dozen brands.
Ive got this 9 volt drill i use in my paintless dent repair business that is very sensitive....my hands are so arthritic I have to get all the help I can because I have to use a twisting motion continuously in my business.

Some of the higher power drills forget it!! they wont release enough!

The only use for the 9 volt is the neck/body screws.

It is very easy to strip the small screws on most guitars.
 
Last edited:

jcs

Member
Messages
8,093
supposedly the outer two are strong enough to do the job alone, but i myself like the idea of all six carrying the force and spreading it over a larger volume of wood. after all, the screws may be hardened but the wood is still soft.

i raise up the middle four so that they still support the bridge but the heads don't interfere.
Those tremolo wood screws are tiny have you ever had to repair a stripped tremolo screw hole?
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom