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Strings for jazz with semihollow body PRS.

mertas

Member
Messages
498
Hi there,
i never tried flatwound guitar strings. Now I am considering them for my jazz-rock prs semihollow body guitar.

What is the difference compared to roundwound strings?
- sound difference?
- sliding , picking?
- how they will sound with distorted sound?

would be find to have your string proposal....
 

sksmith66

Member
Messages
2,953
go grab a set of d'addario chrome flatwounds. they are relatively cheap and actually using them will give you a far better idea of what the basic sound of flatwounds is than any internet description will. if you hate them you'll only be out $10 and 10 minutes to change them out.

generally people will say they are warmer sounding than roundwounds. definitely less string noise when sliding around. they sound great clean or distorted. they seem to last a hell of a lot longer, but that may just be a perception thing. if you like the sound then you can go after stuff like thomastik strings which are far more expensive.
 

JeffOlson

Member
Messages
2,906
I'd spend a bit more and go for Thomastik-Infeld flat-wound Jazz Swings. To my tin ear, they sound (and feel) so much better than D'Addario Chromes. Yes, they are more expensive (around $25 a set), but they are worth it, and they will last nearly a year. (I'm not kidding.) I'd hate for you to get put off of flat-wounds because you tried Chromes. Not all flat-wounds are the same...

PS: I use 12-50 TI Jazz Swings (with a wound G strings) on three guitars: a home-made hollow-body Tele, a CS Tele, and an EJ Strat. They are simply stunning strings.
 

mertas

Member
Messages
498
I'd spend a bit more and go for Thomastik-Infeld flat-wound Jazz Swings. To my tin ear, they sound (and feel) so much better than D'Addario Chromes. Yes, they are more expensive (around $25 a set), but they are worth it, and they will last nearly a year. (I'm not kidding.) I'd hate for you to get put off of flat-wounds because you tried Chromes. Not all flat-wounds are the same...

PS: I use 12-50 TI Jazz Swings (with a wound G strings) on three guitars: a home-made hollow-body Tele, a CS Tele, and an EJ Strat. They are simply stunning strings.

12-50 - it will be nearly impossible to bend,,??


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

monkmiles

Jazz/Funk/Rawk/Groove
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,162
Flats are darker sounding. You won't get any noise running your finger up/down them. Some think they are more comfortable on your finger tips. They are usually thicker gauges and have more tension.

I use TI Jazz Swings on my Eastman archtop and love them. I only play jazz with that guitar though.

The D'Addario flatwound chromes would be good just to try for the feel. But if I were you, I'd try the half wounds which are a comprimise between round and flat: http://www.daddario.com/DADProductF...id=2&sid=e854a9b1-9d1d-497c-b871-4092be47a533

Ultimately, to play jazz, it doesn't matter whether you have round or flat though. Generally jazz players do like thicker strings and don't do much if any bending.
 

mrpinter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,530
Hi: I'm also a very satisfied Thomastik-Infeld user. They are all I put on all my guitars. I play their .010-.044 set of Jazz Swing flatwounds on my traditional tele, and love them. In answer to your questions:

Sound: they are mellower sounding than roundwounds, but still very lively. Very "musical".

Re sliding/picking: they are smooth, so there is absolutely no finger squeak when playing them - NONE. Picking feels the same to me as a comparable weight string in a roundwound.

Re distorted sound. They are fine... again, no real difference in overdrive/distortion behavior compared to roundwound strings.

Give T-I strings a try. I think you'll love them.
 

Yossi

Member
Messages
3,505
what do you have in mind?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I just purchased a Gibson ES-175 NOS 59 and it has a wound G string. I brought it to my luthier to set up and to attach a strap knob to the neck block and I asked him about the G string if I could switch to an unwound G. He explained that the length of the string from the bridge to the nut needs to be different for wound than unwound. If I changed strings without modifying the floating bridge I would have intonation issues. Something else to consider before changing strings.

Notice the bridge at the G string how it shortens the strings distance to the nut. (Not my guitar)

 

JeffOlson

Member
Messages
2,906
You can still use a plain G with a flat-wound set. Just get your strings at, say, juststrings.com and order a single, plain G. (They sell T-I single strings that match the other plain strings in the T-I set.)
 

66Park

Member
Messages
3,023
You can get Chromes with an 11 high E string. I've got those on my L5 and like them quite a bit. In fact, I've had much better luck with the Chromes than with Pyramids, which are over twice the price. Around here, Chromes get a bad rap. On the other hand, Pat Metheny and John Scofield have been using them for years. They are certainly what I'd suggest if you aren't sure about flatwounds. Thomastiks and Pyramids are too expensive for an experiment, at least to me. Flatwounds can be very cool, and there are some sounds you just have to have them for. I always keep a couple guitars strung with flatwounds. I just did a jazz album with one of the most renowned and award winning producers in the world, and he LOVED the sound of that L5 with the Chromes.
 




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