Studio Bass Rig?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by DrJamie, Nov 13, 2005.


  1. DrJamie

    DrJamie Silver Supporting Member

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    I thought my Bloodhound would have plenty of power for a small bass rig for low volume rehearsals, through my Boogie Thiele loaded with a 200 watt EV, but there's no PUNCH. Is it the cab, or do I have to break down and buy a real bass amp? The volume is ok, but flubby through the 12" EV. Thanks, Jamie.
     
  2. covert

    covert Member

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    Okay, first the legitimate stuff.

    Most studio bass tracking involves some direct recording. While this is often combined with a mic'ed amp, it sometimes is used alone. By the same token, a lot of modern bass sound involves compression, in some way.

    What sounds are you looking to emulate?

    Now from an opinion point. I have seldom found any bass cabinet with speakers smaller than 15", other than an SVT, that produced a sound I really liked. I have heard people with 4x10" cabs and such that sounded good, but I never get what I want out of such rigs. It should be understood here that my tastes were formed back in teh days of 18" speakers in folded horn cabs.
     
  3. fatback

    fatback Member

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    You'll need a more powerfull amp to get firm lows. I'd say at least 150watts. Low end takes more power to reproduce clearly than high-end, (bigger waves to push.) If you are just looking to quickly record some bass, a Sansamp Bass DI will get you a decent recorded bass tone very easily.
     
  4. DrJamie

    DrJamie Silver Supporting Member

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    Thanks, I'm only concerned about live rehearsal, NOT recording. I'm getting good bass tracks for recording. I had a feeling I needed more power, like a typical ss bass head. I might have to take my little Thiele cab, and try a real bass head with it. That will probably tell me I need a bass cab too, or a real bass combo. I guess I really didn't need another guitar amp right now. (except for the Bruno 22 for sale here, and the 9/15, and the Macht 6 on ebay, and the Gatton Tele probably sold in Philly...)
     
  5. covert

    covert Member

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    Gotta disagree here. The ampeg B15 usually ran around 50 watts, and had a killer sound. Cabinet has more effect than power in low volume applications.
     
  6. TAVD

    TAVD Guitar Player Gold Supporting Member

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    Yeah, I agree that it's more likely the cabinet than the amp that you'll want to replace. I usually hate 12" speakers for bass, especially EVs. While a great guitar speaker, I found they are light in the deep bass with weird lower mids that need a lot of eq to sound right.

    Try a 2x10 or 1x15 bass cab, depending on the sound you're after.
     
  7. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    here's my rig for the studio:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :D
     
  8. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    +1,982,321

    this is a conservative estimate, but you'll need 4x the power of whatever the guitarists are using.

    so, 50 watt combo? 200 watts for bass.

    again, these numbers only reflect if the guitarist feels like cranking all 50 watts. at least, you wont get lost in the dust.
     
  9. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    man, aint that the beezneez bass rig? :cool:

    unfortunately, its more a low volume app rig now. :(

    yea, w/ all these new fangled 12" loaded bass cabs, i'm still a 10" loaded cab guy. :cool:

    for a cheap but great alternative try www.avatarspeakers.com

    dave makes a quality cab for a great price. has garned LOTS of fans in terms of workmanship/price/quality ratio.
     
  10. aeolian

    aeolian Member

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    Depends on the sound your going after. And for rehersals, what's the deal? I have a little SS Roland cube I leave in the cover band leaders garage, the bass player plays though the PA. We usually just hook up a couple monitors (JBL M somethings with 15's) leaving the subs in the corner. My other band, I bring a regular amp only because I don't have an extra small one to leave there. That band, the bass player gigs with a small GK combo and a 1-12 EV cab. Usually at rehearsal he just plays the combo.

    The idea at rehearsal is to get the arrangement worked out, not play with "killer tones". Playing at gig volumes in a small space won't work the same and just wastes wear and tear on everyone's ears.

    For recording, I use a Sadowski preamp/DI box. I've tried combining that with miking a proper bass rig, and usually just bury the miked amp as it has no definition and uneven response. This is putting an AKG D110 in front of an Eden or SWR 2-10. I think it's easier to mike a guitar cab (which ain't easy in itself).
     
  11. TAVD

    TAVD Guitar Player Gold Supporting Member

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    Miking a bass amp is a whole different story. Go with a 15" as 10's are generally tough to get a good miked sound from. A RE20 or MD421 are good mics to try. I've tried a few kick mics on my b-15 before settling on a 421.
     
  12. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    yea, w/ a proper PA, the bass rig is just for monitoring.

    but a little OT and no offense, mic'ing bass cabs is exactly what a guitar player subbing as a bassist would do. ;) DI's are still the best, most reliable way to achieve onstage bass tones.

    unless of course you're using something like a vintage Ampeg B-15, where the speaker is half the goodness. but other than that, DI's are best.

    for the soundman or engineer, a DI is the easiest way to handle those crazy wack bass frequencies, unlike guitar, where most of the frequencies are in the very easy to manage midrange.
     
  13. fatback

    fatback Member

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    I'm going to respectfully dissagree about 15" speakers being easier to record. It has been very easy for me to get great recorded tones from my Aquilar 4x10/ Boggie 400+ rig. When playing fast picked distorto-bass I definately prefer the imediacy of a 4x10. For laid back soul and deep dubby lines a 15 is fine.

    No matter what speakers/cab you use it's important to realize that low-end sound waves are larger and need more room to develope. Unlike with a guitar cab, close micing a 15" is a recipe for disaster. I find that a 15 needs to be miked at least a few feet back to get a full, even tone. With a 4x10 I have more options. I like to close mic one of the tens and then put a large diaphram mic back about a yard to pick up all 40" of the tens together. Between the two, and maybe a d.i., I have a lot of tonal options to get a nice full sound.
     
  14. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    good thoughts fatback...

    also, i heard due to many bass cabs now offering ports, and in Euphonic Audio's case, "transmission lines", which drastically change the sound coming from their cabs. merely micing the speaker doesnt do that cab justice at all.
     
  15. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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