Suggest a Bass for a Guitarist......

trisonic

Member
Messages
13,152
I asked this a couple of years ago but I'm asking again.....I've always liked the Precision from about '61 with the 'shell 'guard and three colour Sunburst. My neighbour had one from new (when I was a kid) and I remember trying to get around on it when I was 12........
I'd still like one but is that the best for me?

Cheers, Pete.
 
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20,274
If it's comfortable to you- you really can't go wrong with a P- and the sunburst/tort/rosewood combo is classic.

If the nut width is an issue to you, the Jazz has a smaller nut width 1.5" which usually makes it easier for some people that are more used to playing guitar.
 

trisonic

Member
Messages
13,152
I was hoping you'd chime in!
This is going to be used 100% for recording - is the Precision quieter than the Jazz, noisewise?


Best, Pete.
 

Thor

Member
Messages
3,364
P-basses get you a great usable tone probabaly easier than any other. I agree that the Jazz necks are more comfortable (which is why you see so many P's altered to have J necks). Fender still makes some great offereings, but there are A LOT of other excellent alternatives that stick to the P and J formats. Aesthetics are a personal choice, so go with whatever floats your boat. Make sure to let us know what you end up with!
 
Messages
20,274
I was hoping you'd chime in!
This is going to be used 100% for recording - is the Precision quieter than the Jazz, noisewise?


Best, Pete.
Depends on how you use it.

The "regular" P pickup is humbucking by nature.

The Jazz is only humbucking when both pickups are on.

For the most part, for the past 14 years that I've used my Jazz, I rarely ever used the bridge pickup- in effect it was sorta like a single coil P... sorta. I've never had too much of any problem with noise either live or recording (that particularly bothered me). Lately I've gotten into the other possibilities that the bridge pickup offers. However, I'm still more into the neck wide open and *maybe* the bridge on a bit. So much more "rock and roll" sounding. :D

While the J will be much more versatile, think of everything that has been recorded with a P- and that just with that one pickup, volume and tone knob there's a wealth of sounds available to you.
 

trisonic

Member
Messages
13,152
Thanks - very interesting. I actually own an old Cimar copy of a Ric 4001 (?, not sure of correct title) from the '70's. Anyway the neck is way too long for me and I have arms like an ape - I usually use it with both pick ups on with the neck treble rolled off.
The neck width is very cramped; I have large hands with stubby wide fingertips (I should have played bass from the start, I guess).
With that in mind plus I'm a fan of James Jamerson the Precision looks to be the one.

Best, Pete.
 

davess23

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,494
I'm a guitarist who in the past few years began filling in on bass now and then, and just a few months ago I decided to buy one. I'd played other people's basses over the years, including a Hofner Beatlebass, a Warwick (not sure of the model, about a $1200 bass, IIRC), a fretless Jazz, a Jazz, and an old Precision.

When I decided to buy my own I went at the search same as if it were a guitar-- price not the issue,within reason (read, within about a grand or so, new or used, which I figured was plenty for a first instrument) and I ended up with a new MIM Fender Classic 50's Precision. So far I don't have any regrets about my choice. Nice bass, nice price. Simple, straightforward design-- after all, it's a P-bass. Materials, fit and finish are just fine. Pickup sounds good. And take my word for it, the neck is plenty wide enough.
 

Relayer

Member
Messages
41
Excuse my jumping in; first post and all that. For many years I've steered guitar wanna play bass newbies toward Ibanez (yeah, bassplayers, i know, Ibanez :bonk!?). The following reasons:
* Sturdy- You can use them as a snowballbaseball bat and they stay in tune ;
* Cheap- You can find a bunch of them around for less than $250,reason being a lot of stores have a pantload they'd like to be rid of;
* Solid sound- many I's have a 'guitar-like' sound profile that guitarists tend to be comfortable with at first, then;
* Good electronics- Even the passive ones seem to record pretty well.

I say all this as a bass player knowing I don't prefer the I's. But all the guit players I know have at least one in their studios. So save the Fender/Rick/etc for later when you have the tone down and the cash way up!
 
Messages
20,274
Excuse my jumping in; first post and all that. For many years I've steered guitar wanna play bass newbies toward Ibanez (yeah, bassplayers, i know, Ibanez :bonk!?). The following reasons:
* Sturdy- You can use them as a snowballbaseball bat and they stay in tune ;
* Cheap- You can find a bunch of them around for less than $250,reason being a lot of stores have a pantload they'd like to be rid of;
* Solid sound- many I's have a 'guitar-like' sound profile that guitarists tend to be comfortable with at first, then;
* Good electronics- Even the passive ones seem to record pretty well.

I say all this as a bass player knowing I don't prefer the I's. But all the guit players I know have at least one in their studios. So save the Fender/Rick/etc for later when you have the tone down and the cash way up!
Welcome to TGP!

That's a great suggestion- I had a SR 1500(?) for a short while- it was a wonderful playing bass- IIRC, it was neck through with like a 9 piece lamination, really pretty wood. The Ibanez stuff is effortless to play- what's the lower active SR bass? Those are really cool as well.

There's a couple of drawbacks to the Ibanez' the first is that it's an Ibanez. Second, it's styled more "modern." Although it's not unique to Ibanez, it'll sound and feel more modern.

A P will give you a good modern bass sound- the modern bass sound is based off the P sound. The P will also thump. It's meant to do that. Throw some dead flats, a chunk of foam under the strings, roll off the tone and you're rollin' old school.
 

Dr Git

Member
Messages
2,651
I just picked up a deluxe Jazz bass from SX (Rondo) It has upgraded Tuners, Pickups, Hand Filed Frets, Better Electronics and a killer bridge, very similar to the Badass...This bass rules for $200 shipped....i'll update with a pic later
 

BloopBloop

Member
Messages
85
Fender Jazz w/DiMarzio model J pickups. You'll get a great sounding, playing, humfree bass. Way more versatile than P, tonally. DiMarzio model J pickups are humbucking in a stock single-coil size, are cheap, and tonally great. Jaco growl at bridge + near P Bass sound at neck + all sounds in between = my recomendation!
 

kominak

Member
Messages
20
I was in the same position last year - I'm a a guitarist and I wanted a bass guitar for home recording. After much research I ended with a P-bass with jazz bass neck. You can't go wrong with the p-bass sound when recording demos - for pop, rock, blues, ... always sits in the mix very nicely. I'm sure jazz bass would be fine, too, but p-bass sound always had more "character" to my ears...
 




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