Suggestions to "soundproof" music room

bikeracr

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,087
I have a finished, dedicated music room in my basement that needs some additional soundproofing. The room is carpeted and was built with sound proof insulation in all walls and in the ceiling. The room itself does a decent job of keeping most sound in, but needs a little more treatment. I am not able to add more drywall or do any further construction, but need to use sound absorbing panels/foam to get the job done.

The rectangular room is set-up so the amps are against one of the long walls (same side as the door). I am considering placing acoustic panels opposite the amps.
- Should acoustic panels/foal be placed on the wall behind the amps?
- Should acoustic panels be placed on the short walls (to the side of the amps)?
- Would hanging acoustic panels or diffusers be good to place/hang from the ceiling?
- Would bass traps help?

Any thoughts would be appreciated!
 

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,838
Like Vcaster said...two different objectives.

Soundproofing is almost impossible without major renovation.
Acoustic treatment can be a DIY project...basically you want absorption panels placed in corners and walls to stop reflections.
I used these plans and it was pretty inexpensive compared to buying completed panels.
You can use software programs and test mics to formulate placement but you cant go wrong by making 4-6 panels and placing in corners.
 

Madguitrst

Member
Messages
2,742
Agreed with “sound treatment,” versus “soundproofing.” OP, if you've ever been in a pretty much sound "proofed" room/space, it's like being in a vacuum. I don't like it at all.

Now, if you really need to keep sound from leaking into another area, you might consider sound absorption on that side (just a thought).
 

saltbird

Member
Messages
1,687
If you can't completely seal off all of the heating and air conditioning vents in the room, then it will essentially be a futile effort.

Think of a car with music blasting. With the windows rolled up, most of the sound will be muted, but once you roll your window down even just a little bit, most of the sound will escape.

Other than turning down the volume, there's unfortunately only so much you can do. This problem has plagued guitarists and their tube amps since the dawn of electric guitar.
 

Funky54

Member
Messages
4,710
I’ve got this loaded dump truck that we’re lifting with this crane... now I can’t do anything about the cable and hook, but I have this duct tape.
 

batsbrew

Member
Messages
5,408
ONLY MASS.....
can provide soundproofing.
such as concrete block, or poured concrete walls.

you CAN add mass with stud walls, rock wool and multiple layers of gypboard, along with special 'glues' and pieces/parts that de-couple the gyp from the studs...

anything less than any of that,
is probably not going to work well.
 

AintNoEddie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
562
May I add a related question? I've got a basement room as well, now already treated with some acoustic panels and bass corner traps. Concerning sound proofing, it is decent as-is, just the doors are weak spots. Cheap hollow standard doors, that don't seal (gap at the bottom).

Would it make more sense to buy dedicated "sound proof" doors (2), or treat the existing ones with a thick layer of e.g. Basotec? I don't care too much about cosmetics here. And I also don't expect wonders, just a bit of improvement.
 

Crowder

Dang Twangler
Messages
19,083
May I add a related question? I've got a basement room as well, now already treated with some acoustic panels and bass corner traps. Concerning sound proofing, it is decent as-is, just the doors are weak spots. Cheap hollow standard doors, that don't seal (gap at the bottom).

Would it make more sense to buy dedicated "sound proof" doors (2), or treat the existing ones with a thick layer of e.g. Basotec? I don't care too much about cosmetics here. And I also don't expect wonders, just a bit of improvement.
Just going from hollow core with gaps at the bottom to solid core with smaller gaps helped my room quite a bit.

Hollow core doors block about as much sound as cardboard. No exaggeration.
 

AintNoEddie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
562
Just going from hollow core with gaps at the bottom to solid core with smaller gaps helped my room quite a bit.

Hollow core doors block about as much sound as cardboard. No exaggeration.
Thanks, good to know! Yeah, cardboard seems to be a good analogy :)
 

batsbrew

Member
Messages
5,408
Would it make more sense to buy dedicated "sound proof" doors (2), or treat the existing ones with a thick layer of e.g. Basotec?
again,
MASS
makes the difference.

add in some weather stripping around the top, sides, and bottom to tighten it even more
 

NashSG

Member
Messages
3,376
My band is pretty loud live but our new practice space is tight. It's got a nice high ceiling, so it sounds good. We set it up to control volume by just using Palmer PDI with the guitar head and DI running the bass into a PA and then used monitors to mix with the drums live in the room with the vocals.

It actually mixes up in the room playing pretty well and the recorded tracks sound good.

We have also used a splitter and a small practice amp as a personal monitor along with the head/Palmer PDI signal. Small amp helps for being able to control sustain/feedback a bit easier. Volume is way down from when we would play with a 1/2 stack for both bass & guitar.
 




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