Suhr Classic J Opinions

Discussion in 'Bass Area; The Bottom Line' started by A-Bone, Aug 14, 2010.


  1. daysleeper

    daysleeper Member

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    If you want to be a slave to a design the primary purpose of which was to build an instrument as cheaply as possible you are welcome to it. The fact of the matter is that whatever noises you can get from a bolt-on neck, you can get from a through neck, but not vice-versa.

    I won't get into what is a better or a worse noise, because that is subjective. But, keep in mind that many studio musicians, well, musicians in general, are poor, and so can only afford cheaply made instruments, which is not to suggest that these instrument don't, or can't be made to, sound good. My opinion, which you are free to reject, is simply that a through neck results in a vastly superior bass guitar. I'd suggest that you try one, but we all have to find our own path.

    Let's not forget that the original Les Paul was a through neck. This should make at least the idea of a through neck appealing even to a Luddite.
     
  2. LarryNJ

    LarryNJ Senior Member

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    ...I'd hardly consider certain bolt-ons-
    MTD, Sadowsky, Alleva-Coppola, Lull, Lakland,
    etc. etc. as being inexpensive instruments, and for the small number of actual consistently on-call studio musicians- that is, those that make their living primarily doing studio tracks-
    As being poor; matter of fact, at the upper tiers, it pays quite well.
    If your reference was instead to most "working" musicians, of course it's a fact that the vast majoity make under 25K/yearly solely from their musical endeavors, so yeah,most musicians are in fact poor.

    ...All of which has nothing to do with bolt-on vs. neck-thru.
    TO me, they both sound good, and I, like many players, PREFER a bolt-on because I like it's response and "snap".
    Nothing wrong with neck-thru's, that's for sure!
     
  3. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    right, and to be fair, i was baiting daysleeper just a little :hide2

    the obvious fact is, neck-throughs are not tonally "superior" to bolt-ons, just different. a good bolt-on will sound better than a not-so-good neck-through, and vice-versa. that part of its design is just one element out of many.
     
  4. daysleeper

    daysleeper Member

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    I didn't argue that the high end jazz basses are inexpensive. They're not. A great deal of effort goes into fitting the neck into the body's neck pocket. As a result, the fit can be very good and the price will go up accordingly.

    But that's the point. This effort in improving the contact point between the neck and the body is the compromise which is required by a design that is flawed from the perspective of making the best possible bass guitar.

    Why people like what they like, however, has more to do with psychology than hard science. Please play your bolt-ons until your fingers bleed; you'll find little else as satisfying.

    My suggestion is that if you like bolt-ons, you cannot do much better than a basic Ernie Ball Sterling or Stingray. Within the limits imposed by the design, the craftsmanship on these basses is outstanding. Spending much more than about $1,200.00 isn't going to get you very much farther down the road.
     
  5. LarryNJ

    LarryNJ Senior Member

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    The "debate" over b/o vs n/t is sorta classic, and one of course which like aforementiond-

    THERE'S NO CONTESTS with X VS Y vs Z....

    Its all good, jeesh.

    having said that, the majority I feel of the costs of a high-end bolt-on bass don't necessarily go into the neck pocket; rather the electronics, the tonewoods, the finish, the small-build assembly and such. And of course we pay for a name; that's life.

    I own a Single H stock Sterling, and it is a fine bass, but there ARE elements of my Lakland, and my Sadowsky, and my Hen-Bev that justify a higher price-tag than the very fine USA-built EBMM.

    In the end, b/o or n/t; Suhr or Modulus, 4 or 5 string,
    NOTHING-NOTHING is better than anything else as long as the instrument feels good, sounds good, and defines the player who uses it.

    And when I hear statements, and yes, it's a personal issue with me like: "My X blows away a Y!"-It's no contest!"
    Without qualifying that it's true only in their Universe, I think such statements are inane.
     
  6. daysleeper

    daysleeper Member

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    For the people who toiled at crafts and trades, it made no difference that the Earth was not the center of the universe, despite firmly held beliefs. However, science marched on. If you're happy in 1960, I'm not going to burst your bubble.

    For the record: Suhr makes some of the finest instruments available.
     
  7. LarryNJ

    LarryNJ Senior Member

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    For what record?
    Read thru. review, & get back to me with a report.
    http://boutiqueguitarresource.com/


    Suhr is excellent, but there's SO many others that are of the same ilk-
    or better.No contest haha

    Now you'll have to excuse me, I'm going back to toiling at the center of the earth or whatever gem that was you expressed...:crazyguy
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    well, since the bolt-on was the new, technology-driven design of the time and the glued-together guitar was the old, traditional way of doing it, your analogy is accurate, but disproves your point :Devil


    OK, that's not quite true; the old-school way was set-neck, with the neck glued into the body, rather than neck-through, with one piece end-to-end and body wings glued on. i think that arrived with rickenbacker, and the "hippie sandwich" basses from alembic later on.

    the thing is, neck-through may be fancier, harder to do, and thus more expensive, but plenty of people (myself included) just think it doesn't sound as good. you kinda get the sound of the center "stick" without much contribution from the added-on body wings.
     
  9. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    Thanks all for all the information and tips about other quality basses.
     
  10. zenfreud

    zenfreud Supporting Member

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    A-Bone, since you're in the South Bay, take a trip to Gelb in Redwood City and see which high-end J type basses speak to you. I think they carry Fender CS, Lull & Sadowsky, not sure if they're a Suhr dealer. I really dig my passive Lull, oozes quality.
     
  11. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    That is a great tip, and it has been too long since I made the trip to Gelb. Thanks for the reminder.
     
  12. Strat

    Strat Member

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    I'll be saving up for a Sadowsky Will Lee Sig model.
     
  13. Husky

    Husky Gold Supporting Member

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    I wonder if Violin players all get on to forums and argue which instrument is better ?
     
  14. LarryNJ

    LarryNJ Senior Member

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    Yes, they do. My first wife was a Cellist, and her "co-workers", some of them, were instrument snobs beyond belief.

    I have over 30 bass guitars. Not one is better than another, they are all different and I play them all.

    I'd love a Suhr bass, who knows, maybe someday.

    Right now, I'm waiting for my Stevens Slant 4 which is not better than my Sadowsky which is no better than my Lull which is no better than my G&L which is no better than my Trussart which is...

    OK enough.
    You build your instruments to the highest standard of your craft, and no doubt they are the best Suhr Basses available.

    Surely YOU don't think they're better than..... Or Do you?
    We're talking comparable high-end of course.

    My personal issue is when someone claims that their "X" smokes a "Y"-
    because they own one and like it.

    Sorry. Probably no smoking allowed. My .02
     
  15. Husky

    Husky Gold Supporting Member

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    I agree
    I'm scientific "smokes" "is better than" is all subjective and not very scientific.
    I also wish people would post clips of themselves playing when critiquing
    That way the reader could see if the opinion applies to them.
    I will dare to say my instruments that are based off major brands are much more consistent than their fathers. Non of this or any amount of typing and duck swinging will really make anyone acquire magical chops though.
     
  16. LarryNJ

    LarryNJ Senior Member

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    (One of) the BEST, scariest bassists I ever saw play-
    Was in a Gospel Choir backing group in a small Mississippi town we shot through when I was on a tour down South-

    He nailed some Jamerson-style finger-funk, and was so deep-pocket I cried.

    Thank GOD he didn't want to leave his Daddy's farm and come to Los Angeles or somewhere, life is tough enough without a killer player coming out of left field.

    Oh yeah, He was playing a Teisco Del Rey Bass guitar thru a Silvertone Guitar amp, & his idea of "high-end" was a Kustom amp he saw in a pawn shop in Natchez....

    And for the record- SUHR basses, in my humble and personal own opinion, are at the very top of the high-end heap for want of a better term, along with many other fine luthier/builders.

    Thank you and the lot for what you do- Your productions are bargain values for whats put into them, and what they're capable of putting out.
     
  17. jay42

    jay42 Member

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    The OP said he owns mutiple Suhr guitars...so cost isn't an issue. The bass world is, imo, more progressive than the guitar world. ymmv. There are a lot of instruments to try. The finest thing I've ever touched was a fretted F-Bass BN5, which is a bolt-on. Roger Sadowsky states up front that his original goal was to create a product that a recording engineer would recognize both visually and audibly, so no studio time was wasted...just way better than the Fender Inc. version. Lots of ways to skin a cat. Look at John Entwistle's Buzzard action sometime...there's an idiosyncratic technique and his basses were built to suit.
     
  18. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the additional input.
     
  19. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    I agree with that.

    Having owned 2 neck through basses- I don't find their character to be any more desirable than any other bass- except they're neck through. Now that I'm all over that neck through mystique- I don't particularly care that they're neck through.

    I would love to get my dirty little paws on a Suhr.
     
  20. JDouglee

    JDouglee Member

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    Wait, I thought the term 'no contest' was the problem? ;) Where did the smoking thing come from? :bong :crazyguy
     

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