Suhr vs. Danocaster

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by Ricko, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. Ricko

    Ricko Supporting Member

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    My wife has told me that for my next birthday (I'll not say which one, but it's a big number) she wanted to get me a nice guitar. Currently, I have a couple of funky partscasters built by a local guy and a great Suhr Classic Pro S-style. I'd like to add a good Tele-style guitar to the fold and am considering another Suhr T or Danocaster single cut. I've never played a Dano (nor even seen one in person), but considering the accolades I've read, I think it would be a safe bet. On the other hand, my current Suhr is just a fabulous guitar and I have no doubt that a Suhr T would be great as well.

    I'd really appreciate any input from anyone who has owned both makes. Thanks so much!
     
  2. 1radicalron

    1radicalron Member

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    Hard to compare a Partscaster to a Suhr.
     
  3. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    I was just at LA VIntage guitars in LA. If you walked in had the money to get the Danocaster you want, there would be at least 2-3 Tele's you would have a difficult time choosing which is best for you. I have tried Suhr guitars and while they are great guitars they had not the feel a Danocaster has as a well broken in machine with fantastic resonance. If I was in the market that would be the only choice for me cause they are all dang good. On the slight ,LSL makes awesome guitars which are a rival as well as Nash and K-line. Oh! Rocketfire too. Sorry, these guys are building guitars that feel like a real vintage guitar. AND at the moment, vintage rules over new for me any day. So partsocaster away or whatever you say, these guitars kick but.
     
  4. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    Well, Suhr makes an antique line for their Classic S and Classic T so if you're into relics, they have you covered there too, at least in theory.
    -
    Austin
     
  5. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    I would try Suhr again, they are reputable. But the secret is that its not just that it is a relic, its the way it plays, feels, and vibes. To me relic mean nothing but feeling more relaxed with your guitar, I spent a lot of time in paranoia land with guitars and it finally got old. I like a guitar that my bird can **** on and not freak out about it. Danocaster covers the bases of creating a new killer players guitar. And the coolest thing is the frets are new.
     
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  6. daacrusher2001

    daacrusher2001 Silver Supporting Member

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    I have a Suhr Classic Pro T - you'd be hard pressed to find a better T style. Plays great, sounds great, neck profile is perfect, SSC makes it dead quiet.

    That said, I have decided to get on the list for a Danocaster. I played a Fender CS Nocaster over the weekend and if it wasn't so expensive I would have bought it. There is something about that '51 Nocaster neck. It's $1000 more than a Danocaster or a K-Line even at a discounted price. Plus, I want a certain color, and if I have the CS build me one it's even more. So, gonna try a Danocaster

    I'll keep both the Suhr and the new one I get.
     
  7. Ricko

    Ricko Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I'm not too concerned about the relic status...just looking for a guitar that plays and sounds great. The partscasters were bought on a whim since they were inexpensive and different. My Suhr gets the vast majority of my time.
     
    mojocaster.com likes this.
  8. 1radicalron

    1radicalron Member

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    In a few years, If you ever decide to sell = The Suhr will be worth something.
     
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  9. daacrusher2001

    daacrusher2001 Silver Supporting Member

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    As opposed to the Danocaster? They seem to sell for decent prices on the used market...or were you referring to something else?

    I have to tell ya, I looked at a very nice Fender CS Nocaster but the price was $3300...resale would probably be $800-$1000 less. Not sure a $2400 Dano, K-Line, etc. would lose that much?
     
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  10. 1radicalron

    1radicalron Member

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    Just take a look at other used Partscasters on the used Guitar market. Nash for example, now sell used for a mere fraction of what they used to, and Nash used to be VERY popular Relic Guitars here on TGP. = Buy a used Suhr, you can move it anytime for close to what you paid for it.
     
  11. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    I've never played a Danocaster. But I did buy a Classic Pro. And I love it. Recently got a Classic Pro T because I figured it would be equally as great. And it is. It's great in exactly the way the Classic Pro is. I still have more fun playing my Classic Pro, but that's just a strat vs. tele thing. So you wouldn't go wrong with a Classic T, but that's not to say you wouldn't love a Danocaster for what it brings to the table.
    -
    Austin
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
  12. theanalogdream

    theanalogdream Supporting Member

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    I'm sure you can't go wrong with either, but I can tell you that the dano will hold its value super well. Also, there are tons of pros who are vintage nuts who love their Danos. Suhrs tend to find a certain demograph in terms of style...
     
  13. Teleplayer

    Teleplayer Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Danocasters rarely - if ever lose value. Comparing Danocaster to Nash is an exercise in laughability. Danocaster makes a really, really fine instrument, especially for the dough. Nearly impossible to compete with Dan at that price point. They feel extremely broken in, used, comfortable, like the real thing (and I've had my hands on many of "the real thing").

    Danocasters are "partscasters". Holy $#it - where have we heard that tired, beaten-to-death schtick before??? Blah, blah, blah. Some people need to sort of jump off that merry-go-round at some point in their lives. Dan uses bodies by Guitar Mill (Mario Martin) and necks custom cut to his specs by USACG. Then, between Dan himself, and his "A Team" of employees, they spin their magic on the neck, finish, pickup matching, etc. Somehow, they come out feeling like guitars that have been hanging around and played since the 50s or 60s. If you get a Dano and dislike it, put it up for sale; you'll likely get back what you paid for it.

    I've owned and played various by both you mentioned. Get a Dano. It's basically a little-to-no-risk purchase.
     
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  14. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    And yet, it certainly looks like you implied they were comparable in your first post in this thread?!?
    -
    Austin
     
  15. Teleplayer

    Teleplayer Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Post #13 was my first post in this thread.
     
  16. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    :roll I'm an idiot! I will keep my post#14 up as evidence of such. Reading is Fundamental, especially when it comes to usernames :facepalm
    -
    Austin
     
  17. Guitardave

    Guitardave Supporting Member

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    I've been playing a Suhr Classic tele as my main guitar for the 9 years...I've bought and sold several other Suhr strats/teles because none of them were quite on par with my main Suhr. While not a Danocaster, I currently have a LSL strat/tele and they are VERY different playing experiences - the LSL's feels and sound like an absolutely great vintage guitar with no issues, the Suhr's feel and sound more modern in comparison. I still play the Suhr the majority of the time simply because I'm more comfortable with how it responds.
     
  18. mslugano

    mslugano Supporting Member

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    Never played a Danocaster but they look great...for a largely vintage spec S or T. I've owned a ton of Suhrs and one of the reasons I keep going back is that Suhr provides a very broad range of spec choices and super high quality build. As I understand it, with Dan you kind of get what he's built. Nothing wrong with that if you are OK with the specs he's chosen but it wouldn't really work for me.
     
  19. paulvcarter

    paulvcarter Member

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    Playing = Suhr
    Looking, feel of an old friend = Danocaster

    I have owned, own both.
     
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  20. leftycajun

    leftycajun Member

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    That's still a partscaster. Pretty much the definition of a partscaster. Nothing wrong with that, by the way. I love a good partscaster, and Danocasters seem like killer guitars. I can't recall ever hearing a bad word said about them.
     

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