SUP recomendations

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by PBC, May 5, 2015.

  1. PBC

    PBC Member

    Messages:
    608
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2013
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    My wife and I are looking to get into standup paddle boarding, we both have had long careers racing mountain bikes and are looking to transition into something a little different. Anyone here have any real experience with the sport that can offer a beginner some good advice on what to buy and how much to realistically budget for? TIA
     
  2. tele_phil

    tele_phil Member

    Messages:
    2,669
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boulder, CO
    I have a Glide Quest that I'm pretty happy with for what I do - paddle mountain lakes for exercise and fly fishing. You should rent a few in your area to see what works best on your waters of choice.

    http://www.glidesup.com/products/quest
     
  3. Tahitijack

    Tahitijack Member

    Messages:
    3,684
    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2002
    Location:
    San Clemente, CA
    My wife and I are in our 4th year of SUP. There was so much to learn at the beginning. Sort of like skiing. What kind of ski do I need, what size poles? Same thing with SUP.

    Start with a tour of youtube SUP lessons. Watch as many as you can. Some are complete some rush through assuming you know how already. When you get your board and paddle take one or two lessons from a reputable shop.

    Gear.
    There are several different styles of boards. For a beginner I recommend an all around/family board especially if you will be a flat water rider (lakes and slow moving rivers and streams). Your local shop can help assess what you need to get started. I'm still on my original board 11' long 30" wide Paddle Surf Hawaii. This is very stable. My wife is on a 10'6" long 29" wide board. The faster you paddle the more stable your board will be. Keep your eyes on the horizon to improve your balance. Most folks look at the nose, which results in falling into the water. When you do get back on your board first then recover your paddle.

    Your paddle should be light but strong. They are measured with you standing flat ground and reaching up with one hand so that your fingers curl over the top of the handle. These can be pricy for a carbon fiber/light weight. We went with Quick Blade, but like guitars there are a lot to choose from. Your paddle strategy when a boat passes is to paddle quickly across the wake at 90 degrees keeping your head up eyes looking at the horizon. The speed and board will help absorb the wave shock and you will cross nice and dry.

    Leash. Like a surfboard, when you fall in you don't want your board to drift away. I changed mine to a curly leash last year to keep it out of the water and eliminate drag and catching kelp.

    PFD. Personal Flotation Devices are required in some places. While the Coast Guard requires them in all waters, except those designated for swimming, they are not required in surfing areas. My experience is they are not uniformly enforced. PFD come in two styles: vest similar to those worn on jet skis and inflatables worn around your waste. The cheapest way to go if you are a good swimmer is to buy the old orange life jacket and tie it on the tail of your board and tow it along. Oddly this is accepted by the CG.

    Best advice is to do your homework, buy a couple of SUP magazines and check the Stand-up Zone, forum for lots of advice and information.


    Best advice visit a SUP shop and take a lesson or two. My experience is that women actually pick this up faster than men, so don't be surprised if your wife is out there putting distance between you two.

    I hope this is helpful as a starting point. I've found that SUPers are a friendly group of folks. We are starting to see some young guns out on the water, which I hope means the sport will be strong for decades to come.

    Paddle On!
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2015
  4. mark norwine

    mark norwine Member

    Messages:
    16,145
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2005
    Location:
    NJ...GSP135
    When did "Supping" become the word?

    This has been called "Punting" for at least 2 centuries....
     
  5. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,756
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    My understanding is that "punting" involves a long pole that is pushed against the bottom. A "sup" uses a paddle that just dips into the water.

    It's a simple past-time, that probably gets over-complicated. PAddling a SUP on flat water is vey easy, and I see first-timers doing well wiht it all the time at Currumbin, but getting into bumpy water is a different situation altogether.
    To the OP, if you are athletic people, you will have no dramas. Just hire a few different boards to get a feel for them.
    The Fanatic Falcon is a lovely board for paddling longer distances. JP do great boards for surfing.
     
  6. SharkB8

    SharkB8 Member

    Messages:
    38
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Fantastic sport. You'll have a blast. It's super easy, esp if you're active and have been doing balance based sports (like Mtb) for a while.

    https://www.paddlesurfwarehouse.com/

    Talk to Jeff, he'll put together a package (and usually beat the online price) that'll get you going. I've had his boards for years, both lake and surf style and they've held up REALLY well.

    Have a BLAST!
     
  7. Anthony Gring

    Anthony Gring Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,492
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2004
    Location:
    Carpinteria, CA.
    great advice here . definitely check out the stand up zone. it's the tgp of SUP . you'll definitely want to invest in a good carbon fiber paddle . make sure its cut to the right length for your height . check out different boards rent different boards before throwing money down . and yeah, don't look down . it's really an awesome sport. I've been doing it 8 years now . my wife only likes flatwater so we paddle in the harbor with her . if I'm by myself I'm surfing on it . you will realize that working out was never so much fun .
     
  8. Nevets

    Nevets Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,986
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2014
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    I've heard that the inflatable SUPs these days are very good and a good option if you don't have the storage space or roof racks for a ridgid board.

    SUP'ing looks like a lot of fun. Never tried it yet but am planning to do a few overnight trips this year alongside a friend on a SUP. We tried touring once so far this season and it was a blast for all of us. Good luck OP, hope you enjoy it!
     
  9. Anthony Gring

    Anthony Gring Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,492
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2004
    Location:
    Carpinteria, CA.
    True... Current inflatables are great. Rigid and stable. No need to worry about tie downs / roof racks.
     
  10. Jim S

    Jim S Silver Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,171
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Incline Village, NV (Lake Tahoe )
    I SUP to three times every week.

    The best advice is just to demo different boards. It's like recommending the guitar next to someone.

    It also depends on your means of transportation and how far you have to travel to drive and then from the vehicle to the water.


    However, definitely invest in a strong lightweight carbon fiber paddle. That is a no-brainer.


    It's a great sport. You can enjoy the outdoor beauty and get the most incredible sublime work out for your whole body including strength and cardio.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2015
  11. PBC

    PBC Member

    Messages:
    608
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2013
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Thanks for the advice guys, both the wife and I ended up buying a pair of YOLO boards.
     
  12. ford

    ford Supporting Member

    Messages:
    12,947
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Location:
    south of Houston, TX
    Its a sport I'm looking to get into also...

    There aren't a lot of rental places here in Houston/Galveston. I may have to drive three hours to Austin to really get to try some out. They have a couple of shops that do demos every weekend I think.


    I want an all around board that can handle flat water and small waves like we get in Galveston.


    I'm over 200 pounds, so I also have to make sure it has the right volume to keep me afloat! ;)
     
  13. PBC

    PBC Member

    Messages:
    608
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2013
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA


    We are pretty fortunate here in Atlanta to have a couple shops that carry a strong selection, we ended up buying from High Country outfitters. That being said the bulk of our research was done online and the main contenders for us were the YOLO brand, Surftech and Bic brand boards. FYI Amazon had an amazing offer on the Bic brand last week, not sure if it's still there today though. I'm just under 200 lbs and the 12' YOLO coastal cruiser was what I ended up on http://www.yoloboard.com/shop/product616.html
     

Share This Page