Super rare TRAINWRECK LIVERPOOL!

sinasl1

Silver Supporting Member
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8,905
Great work, @sinasl1. I haven't studied all the Trainwreck Circuits topologies, so I don't know how the Liverpool works, but for a certain kind of distortion, every ’Wreck I've ever heard has been a different shade of perfect. There are shades of Plexi in there (especially 50-watt), of a Deluxe Reverb at its exact sweet spot, of an AC30 with a treble booster hitting precisely the right frequencies, but it's not quite any of them, because it's not quite anything.

Those mid and upper-mid "crunch"/"roar" frequencies are gorgeous, like the exact right Fender/Marshall hybrid. Any kind of staccato Townshend/EVH chord-fragment playing has the sweetest sort of edge on it, good lord.
Exactly! And that description actually kind of matches the circuit, as I understand it… it’s a real hybrid/original design
 

sinasl1

Silver Supporting Member
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8,905
It's like an extension of your hand... if you play in a way that it feels like the note is going to scream, it screams, if you want to tuck it down, it tucks down. It's like having an extra dimension of control. Like a finger controlled synth filter.
There’s also kind of excitement you get when you feel that, maybe unexpectedly, a note is about to take off… which changes the way you play, changes the music you make. It’s Such a big part of what rock guitar is all about, to me. It’s kind of like something Peter Frampton related to me recently, he was mentioning when he first borrowed his famous Les Paul, before it was his, and played it at the Fillmore… His comment was “my feet didn’t touch the ground”… it took his playing to another level. Then the guitar was gifted to him! But that’s the feeling, it’s really special… It’s just so fun and rewarding to play. I feel like it’s what so many of us are going for when we’re swapping pick ups, trying different gear… Trying to get to that feeling.
 
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3
SUPER RARE TRAINWRECK LIVERPOOL AMP! AMPS IN THE ZONE #7

Not mine, on loan… I’ll be sorry to see it go!!! A fun piece of amp history…
I enjoyed seeing you light up an old amp for the youngsters. That natural feedback (with a diverse and rich platter of overtones ready to go) is quite something despite the obvious volume and your proximity to it - what do you attribute it to?
 

sleshnyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,429
first of all, another amazing demo Pete. And yes, what a sound. I have a Whitney Wrockcrusher, which was Mike Whitney's version and i have to say it's eerily similar in sound. Not to take anything away from this, bc it is indeed special, but if anyone ever runs into one of Mike's amps, check em out. A bit less than the price of a Wreck.
 

stratovarius

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,102
No, it kills the dynamics considerably. These are designed to be straight into a cab only.
I think I might go one step further. They are designed to be played loudly (kind of unavoidable really). First of all, there is feedback from the guitar. Speakers behave differently at volume as well. There is also the physiology of the human ear which not only reacts to frequencies differently at high volumes, but compresses and masks detail.
 

sinasl1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,905
I enjoyed seeing you light up an old amp for the youngsters. That natural feedback (with a diverse and rich platter of overtones ready to go) is quite something despite the obvious volume and your proximity to it - what do you attribute it to?
Ken’s circuits! Whatever he did, he always maximized the compression/touch response/feedback on command thing…
 

mysticaxe

Member
Messages
748
I think I might go one step further. They are designed to be played loudly (kind of unavoidable really). First of all, there is feedback from the guitar. Speakers behave differently at volume as well. There is also the physiology of the human ear which not only reacts to frequencies differently at high volumes, but compresses and masks detail.
The closest I've played to a Wreck was the Voodoo Amps variation (probably almost 15 years ago), and that sound is still stuck in my head. My main concern there is that there is a limited range of volume where the amp delivers the goods, hence the idea of a Powerstation to try to expand...

Pete's vid didn't help the GAS that I've spent the last 15 years trying to suppress (successfully so far).
 

stratovarius

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,102
I was at the New York Amp Show mentioned earlier in the thread. As I recall, Gene brought the tan Dumble and two Trainwreck amps, right? I believe at the time he owned the Gibbons (Sara) and Lynch (Suzanne) amps and I think he also had one Liverpool and one Rocket, but I cannot remember the names. The Rocket may have been Marcy.
 
Messages
1,415
Exactly! And that description actually kind of matches the circuit, as I understand it… it’s a real hybrid/original design
I haven't looked much at Liverpool schems, but the Express circuit is a fascinating thing:

• in terms of which-part-goes-where, it's very blackface Fender (the tone stack is right after the input stage, and then you need to recover the gain),
• but the tonestack itself is a blackface/Marshall hybrid,
• and then the rest of the preamp is a wild gain-staging machine, so it gets into serious overdrive and that magical sustain/feedback at lower volume (and with less of that caving-in power-section fuzz) than your standard NMV Plexi- or blackface-type amp.

I haven't played a ’Wreck, and there may be any number of factors I can't see just from the schems I've got, but that's how it looks to me: a really unique signal path that combines Marshall + Fender topologies and Marshall + Fender tone stack values, and then soaks the preamp signal in gain before hitting the power section, hence the lower-volume breakup and the less fuzzed-out, more chunky/articulate character.
 
Messages
1,415
There’s also kind of excitement you get when you feel that, maybe unexpectedly, a note is about to take off… which changes the way you play, changes the music you make. It’s Such a big part of what rock guitar is all about, to me. It’s kind of like something Peter Frampton related to me recently, he was mentioning when he first borrowed his famous Les Paul, before it was his, and played it at the Fillmore… His comment was “my feet didn’t touch the ground”… it took his playing to another level. Then the guitar was gifted to him! But that’s the feeling, it’s really special… It’s just so fun and rewarding to play. I feel like it’s what so many of us are going for when we’re swapping pick ups, trying different gear… Trying to get to that feeling.
100% – Miles Davis used to give all his band members the same piece of advice for soloing: "Play what you know, and then play above what you know." That's exactly what I find with the gear that really works for me: I can play what I know, and then it will push me beyond what I know.
 

sickboy79

Member
Messages
13,275
Absolutely outstanding video, Pete. Well done. Loved the playing and tones. Amazing how that harmonic feedback comes out in the cleaner tones. Definitely makes me want to go get a Wreck clone or designed amp like a Komet! Someday!
 






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