Super reverb enough clean headroom?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by jamon, Dec 21, 2009.

  1. jamon

    jamon Member

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    My drummer is loud. It breaks up at 5 but probably due to the fact that it needs new tubes. I need to turn it up to about 7 to get over our drummer. Are there any speakers and tubes that can offer more clean headroom so that its not overdriven at 7, and or make it a bit louder?
     
  2. 5150user

    5150user Member

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    Just put some Groove Tube 6L6's in it that are rated somewhere between 8 and 10, on their scale of 1-10.

    This is a fine solution to your problem. You'll have a LOT of Clean Headroom. Drummers...
     
  3. jamon

    jamon Member

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    thank you, and yes drummers are the most stubborn members of any band...
     
  4. jamon

    jamon Member

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    anyone else?
     
  5. spitshineguitars

    spitshineguitars Member

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    Yes what he said. I'd put some efficient ceramic speakers in. Those alnico jensens (i'm assuming it's a RI) will break up quicker. Also maybe try placing your amp on a hard surface off the ground. like a good table or big stool. that'll get the volume in your ear AND your drummers. Or you could get a cheap PA and mic it. either way, DON'T sell your Super. I regret selling my 2 of them everyday. one of the best amps ever made.
     
  6. jamon

    jamon Member

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    the super is a sf maybe 71, 72 i dont know... also, you dont think a twin would be more suitable? I get the volume I need at about 7 right now on the amp, will new speakers/tubes give me more volume on tap?
     
  7. spitshineguitars

    spitshineguitars Member

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  8. Zuper

    Zuper Supporting Member

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    Try new tubes before you change out speakers. A full re-tube (pre and power) is likely to give you what you need. If that doesn't get you where you want to be, look into some speaker alternatives.
     
  9. Doc W

    Doc W Member

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    I am an old guy with some experience in this. Let me save you years of frustration in the pointless pursuit of more volume. If a Super Reverb is not loud enough to be heard over your drummer, get another drummer.

    This is where you will wind up eventually.
     
  10. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    If a Super Reverb doesn't have enough clean headroom to play alongside your drummer, I don't want to be in the same room as the amp that DOES have enough.
     
  11. pauly-ray

    pauly-ray Member

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    There must be something not right with your super. We have a pretty loud drummer and I can barely get to 3.
     
  12. pedalcr8z

    pedalcr8z Supporting Member

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    Easy! You just need a can of drummerwhoopass and if that doesn't work simply get a can of drummereuthanasia:beer
     
  13. GTRJohnny

    GTRJohnny Member

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    :agree This old guy agrees with that old guy. There will reach a point where the loud ringing in your ears will keep you up at night. Don't take that bus...
     
  14. Blues_N_Rock

    Blues_N_Rock Member

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    What type of rect do you use in the amp? You could also use a pair of Philips 7581A tube to increase the headroom.
     
  15. Jamie_Mitchell

    Jamie_Mitchell Member

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    JBL D110s?
     
  16. thetangmang

    thetangmang Member

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    Tinnitus = Every guitarists/musicians/musicophile's worst nightmare.
     
  17. Marble

    Marble Member

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    put in a 5751 in the the V1 or V2 slot. I bet you probably use the Tremolo channel, so it would be V2. Make sure you have a tube in the V1 slot even if you don't use it, not having a tube in V1 adds gain. In the Reverb recovery slot (V4 I think) You might want a 12AT7, but I think it expects to see a 12ax7, so another 5751 might also be good there. In your last slot next to the power tubes (V6) Put in a quality 12AT7 (If you can't find one from an old radio repair shop, order up a NOS Mullard 12AT7 for $30.)

    All that should get you lower gain, and is probably cheaper than swapping out a quad of speakers.
     
  18. big e

    big e Member

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    If you like the sound of your amp now, don't do a thing. I typically run my 66' Super between 3-4 with no problem being heard. HOWEVER! where you place your amp is critical. I use the tilt back legs and aim the speakers near my mid back (pointed at my ears is too much!). If you are placing your amp flat on the floor, pointing straight out all the sound is going out below your knees and not up to your ears~! Amp placement is critical if you don't have a great monitor system.

    THat said if you are placing your amp in a position where it's "aimed" at you and you still can't hear, I agree, tell the drummer to either bring his volume down to match the band or he will have to be replaced. The drummer really setting the stage volume. Cymbals and snare drums are typically the loudest things on stage.

    Two other choices for the drummer: 1-buy a plexi shield to isolate him somewhat from the band. 2-buy an electronic drum kit so he can play as hard as he wants but his volume can easily be control to suit any gig. My current drummer is the first I"ve played with using an electronic kit (Roland) and it's great for gigs where you have to keep the volume reasonable.
     
  19. Timinator

    Timinator Supporting Member

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    This will do and it will sound great too. The JBL's would work too, but that's an expensive way to get a bit more headroom.
     
  20. Doc W

    Doc W Member

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    There are some really good postings here that have to do with how to control the sound and I don't mean to minimize that kind of advice.

    However, let me expand on what I said earlier. I remember when bands played through small amps (loooong ago) and as drummers got very loud, by the mid 60s, it was impossible to be heard as a guitar player. Bass players followed the same trend. Couple this with the increasing size of concert venues and and it was not long before huge amps became the norm.

    No one loves to rattle the floorboards more than I do and there is just something great about making some big iron really bark. But there is a serious price to pay for all of this, from ear damage to simply having no control over sound. Now that we have really, really good PA systems and monitors, there is just no need for big amps, maybe not even medium big amps.

    I don't play pro anymore but the last gigs I did (five years ago) were with a 1958 Tremolux and an early 60s brownface Concert (at low volume, for clean sounds). I told the bass player and especially the drummer, that's it folks, that's all the volume there is. If you wanna hear what I'm doing, play more quietly. Keep in mind that low volume does not keep a band from really kicking ass in a deep groove. If you don't think so, look at some vids of the Muddy Waters band in the early 60s, with an upright bass no less.

    One small suggestion. When you go for a solo, make sure the drummer does not try to "fill" with a huge ride cymbal. Far too many of them do this and it completely drowns out the guitar making you think you need a bigger amp. Seriously, keeping drummers away from the garbage can lids will make a huge difference in the sound competition on stage.

    end of rant
     

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