Tab for pedal steel type licks on guitar

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by mingo, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. mingo

    mingo Member

    Messages:
    430
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    Does anyone have any tab for any pedal steel type licks on guitar??

    I'll start things off... good ending lick in D Major


    E -----------------------------------------
    B -----------------------------------------
    G ------------------9 full step-----------
    D ----------11-half step----------------
    A -----12---------------------------------
    E -----------------------------------------
     
  2. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

    Messages:
    2,448
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Nice one! Always a bit tricky on the intonation with the half/whole step bend combos, but it's worth the effort. I play a B-bender tele, but I'll stick with stuff that can be standardly obtained.

    A current fave move is to do a backwards pick rake with harmonics across three strings, such that it yields a sus2 chord - and then resolve the 2nd to the 3rd by doing a behind-the-nut whole step bend.

    For example:

    D, A, and E strings with harmonics at the 5th or 12th fret yields Dsus2.

    D, A, and E strings with harmonics at the 7th or 19th fret yields Asus2.

    G, D, and A strings with harmonics at the 5th or 12th fret yields Gsus2.

    G, D, and A strings with harmonics at the 7th or 19th fret also yields Dsus2.

    I live for this stuff, but if I start tabbing out my pet moves, I'll be here all night!

    One more for now, and this is a I - II - I implication in A, with upward bends, and reverse/release bends (which are not indicated on tab):

    E -9--half step----------------------------
    B -10--whole step-------------------------
    G -9--whole step--------------------------
    D -----------------------------------------
    A -----------------------------------------
    E -----------------------------------------
     
  3. mingo

    mingo Member

    Messages:
    430
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    i'll try those out for sure

    so with this one for example,
    D, A, and E strings with harmonics at the 5th or 12th fret yields Dsus2.

    you would only bend the E string behind the nut right?


    the other one with the A formation might be tricky, but shouldn't be must harder than any other half/full step bends.


    thanks, feel free to throw out anymore of those little gems if you could.
     
  4. mingo

    mingo Member

    Messages:
    430
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    do you find that a lot of guitars go out of tune after doing behind the nut stuff.... except for teles.
     
  5. mingo

    mingo Member

    Messages:
    430
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    also what do you mean when you say this

    "I - II - I implication in A"


    sorry for all the questions, just trying to figure things out. I find i know a lot of this stuff, but not the technical names for the stuff.

    thanks
     
  6. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

    Messages:
    2,448
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Correct.

    I'm usually playing Teles when I go for this type of thing, but I don't have any tuning stability issues with my Strats for the behind-the-nut bends. My Les Paul Special and SG Classic are definitely less forgiving in this respect.

    If you harmonize the A major scale, the second (or II) chord is B-7. Per my previous example, when the A triad is bent to the designated pitches, the resulting notes are, low-to-high: F#, B, and D, which constitutes the spelling for a B minor triad. Releasing the bends of course resolves to the I chord. Technically, it could also probably be thought of as a I - IV - I resolution (in the sense that the IV would be a D6); and the ear would most likely "hear" (perceive) it as such if the underlying harmony and vibe were coming from, say, a western swing-type angle. Six of one, half dozen of the other... either way, the harmony works over a basic A tonality.
     
  7. mingo

    mingo Member

    Messages:
    430
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    totally get what your saying now... thanks!
     
  8. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

    Messages:
    2,448
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    I - IV move in E ( E9 - A6):

    Key: (#) = fretted counterpart pitch of bent note

    E ---------------------
    B ---------------------
    G -9-(11)----9-(11)----
    D -12--------11--------
    A -11--------10--------
    E ----------------------
     
  9. mingo

    mingo Member

    Messages:
    430
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    in what case would you use that?? in what chord progression??

    thanks!
     
  10. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

    Messages:
    2,448
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Basically, just use the first shape over E7, and the second over A7. If the tune has a V chord, just move the second shape up a whole step for B7. Typical application for me would be a standard (bluesy) country shuffle I - IV - V twelve bar. But then, I'm prone to toss the fake pedal steel stuff into all sorts of inappropriate places...!
     

Share This Page