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Talk me out of/in to a Schmidt Array Pedalboard

leighianson

Member
Messages
1,883
Lately I’ve been really gassing for a Schmidt Array Pedalboard, I think they look really streamlined and professional.

I have been planning a big pedalboard for a long time, I’ve even bought a very good angled board that’s rather large, around a pedal train pro size, but I’m still pining for one of these crazy looking SA boards.

My band have been playing quite small stages and I don’t think I could even bring my big planned pedalboard, that’s the way I’m trying to justify the very expensive SA stuff.

I’d love to hear from current users about their experiences. My problem is that for around the same money it would take to get one over here to Australia, I could almost get a full time Solid State Tape Echo (which I’ve also been gassing for)

Thoughts?
 

GeLoFi

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
929
They are excellent but highly priced for sure. I want one. I'm sure that's not much help to you...
 

maxx77

Member
Messages
221
They look great!
But then, they are extremely expensive and if you have to carry them a lot, count with 7kg (15lbs~-) + pedals.
So, would you be willing to carry 44lbs? If it's to stay at home, go for it.
 

jacopo

Member
Messages
489
If you can afford one, go for it. If you can't, try asking for a special quote and go for it anyway.
They are built (and weigh) like a Panzer.
Extreme quality has its price.
 

Jazzmaster60

Member
Messages
1,543
Looks like the end of the game if you buy one .
You’ve already got a very good board but you want another board .
So you know you want to.
 

MrMoose

Member
Messages
2,112
Likely more than you (or anyone) actually NEEDS to spend, but they seem worth the money to me, I've yet to see a better pedalboard!
 

John Mark Painter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
11,779
They look amazing but it won’t make you play or sound better. And if you are playing places that don’t even have room for it...it’s just silly.

Boards like that are for the player that already has everything and wants a solid touring board.

But again....they are NICE
 

haryb

Member
Messages
81
I personally don't like their design, but that is just my taste. I don't doubt in the quality, especially for the price and the origin of manufacturing, however what would bother me the MOST with these types of pedalboards is the WEIGHT.

I really don't know how I could handle it if were gigging regulary and I can say that I am in a pretty good shape.

When I've started with the whole pedalboard story, after some initial builds, I decided to personally build a pedalboard inspired by all the custom boutique pedalboards popular at the time (helweg, salvage, creation, etc), covered in tolex, with all the jacks and power-switching on the side etc. It took some time to build it and turned out quite nice, but that's another story - the point is that at the end, even though it was just a small-to-medium board, I think something like 500x300mm, once loaded with all pedals an powersupply it becomes lot heavier that it seems. And I have used the thinnest plywood that I could find, without compromising the integrity of the board, but still it's wood, not lightweight aluminium. That made me learn a practical lesson.

Today if I search for a new pedalboard, first thing I look is the weight. At the moment the lightest pedalboards I could find that also look pretty slick are the one from the MONO company, that makes those bags, but they are too expensive considering it doesn't come with any kind of bag.

I think the weight issue became apparent with most of these boutique companies, since they all have redesigned their boards, making them lighter combining aluminium and bits of wood in their builds, where the wood is mostly for added cosmetics.

Anyways, sorry for digressing.

Since you live in Australia, if I were you, I would search locally and not bother with the imports, unless that is just really something that you want, then go for it. Those Caseman pedalboards look really good to me though.
 
Last edited:

your name here

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,044
Well, I have an SA450 and it isn’t heavy. The cool thing about the Schmidt Array boards is that you can hide pedals you don’t have to tweak under the top deck, if you use a switcher.

I was able to fit a bunch of stuff onto mine after switching over to the tiny GigRig power supply and using a Boss ES-8. So, the same amount of pedals as I’d have on a big board, but now a small footprint.

The board as others have said is built amazingly well, is light and Schmidt Array’s customer service is exemplary. Here is a shot with the top deck open and closed.

 

Coheed

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
632
I want one too. The SA600 would be awesome....but damn that’s a lot of dough for a pedal board.
 

D K Souther

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
757
I'm not going to say whether you should get one or not, but I have a story: I sometimes go to the racetrack with a buddy. He has a track Miata. He and his car/ race club do track days and amateur races. Often times on track days people will show up with high end sports cars, full race gear, carbon fiber helmets etc. These guys with all of the horsepower, gear, and prestige get smoked on the track. It's not close. Miatas, or Honda S2000s, or Subarus with a good driver trump horsepower all day. The fancy drivers always look like posers. You may want to consider how you will project.

(This isn't intended as a jab at the wealthy, just an observation. If I had the resources I would do the same thing.)
 

haryb

Member
Messages
81
Well, I have an SA450 and it isn’t heavy. The cool thing about the Schmidt Array boards is that you can hide pedals you don’t have to tweak under the top deck, if you use a switcher.

I was able to fit a bunch of stuff onto mine after switching over to the tiny GigRig power supply and using a Boss ES-8. So, the same amount of pedals as I’d have on a big board, but now a small footprint.

The board as others have said is built amazingly well, is light and Schmidt Array’s customer service is exemplary. Here is a shot with the top deck open and closed.
I consider a "smaller" board of size 450 mm x 350 mm that weights almost 5 kg heavy, but that is just me. It would have bothered me if I had to carry it regularly to gigs. But then again, I am no gigging musician, so maybe that is normal.
 

leighianson

Member
Messages
1,883
Thanks for all the responses. It’s good to hear differing opinikns and what people like/dislike about pedalboards in general.

I’m not too concerned about weight really, which is proved by the fact that I prefer to bring a 2 x 12 cab, Germino head and fryette PS to most gigs over my smaller combo.

I’m wondering if I could fit my RJM PBC and a volume pedal on the SA600.....
 

Gumbygreeneye

Member
Messages
1,371
I have a very large Schidt array which I had sent to New Zealand. Very pricey but built impeccably built.

I had the first one with the Gigrig G2 attached and made a design with an internally raised tray for the cabling to come out the back of the G2. I just went on their site and see they’re doing this more.

Still have it 3-4 years later.

Built like a tank but very heavy.
 

fenderjapan

World Heavyweight Champion
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,538
The thing I have realized is that I make changes all the time. If you make changes all the time, you want something like a Pedaltrain.

The Schmidt Array, from my perspective, looks somewhat modular... if you wanted to swap out a couple pedals it would be easy, but big changes would be complicated. Easier than, say, an LA Sound board that you would build with the expectation you were going to keep it exactly the same.
 






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