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Talk to me about Paiste

Hulakatt

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Silver Supporting Member
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13,168
I've been playing Zildjians forever, mostly 60's A's and a smattering of 90's A Customs and The Armand line from a few years ago. I've played some Sabians and wasn't impressed much but I really haven't had any opportunities to play anything else. I've been intrigued by Paiste for awhile now but don't know much about them other than Swiss made (I believe), sold by Ludwig in the 60's and 70's and they seem to have a refined and high end of the cymbal market.

What are your experiences? Thoughts?
 

MkIIC+

Gold Supporting Member
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1,612
I've had the following cymbals...

Zildjian A390 set -- I didn't use them much as I bought the Paiste 2002s at the same time.

Paiste 2002 Bonham set -- I loved them out of the gate. Huge and cutting. I added the Mediums later and replaced the Crashes. They are very close and I found the Mediums just a little better. A touch less "harsh" sounding.

Paiste Big Beat -- These are the dark counterparts to the bright 2002. I immediately preferred them to the regular redline 2002s.

Paiste Formula 602 Classics -- These displaced the Big Beats. I found them more controlled and I liked the tonality better. The way the sound exploded from the stick was dreamy. Much less cutting that the 2002s and livelier than the drier sounding Big Beats.

The Paistes I bought were at a higher level than the one Zildjian set I had started with and those Zildiians ain't bad at all. The redline 2002 were ultimately too big, brash and cutting for me. They are really meant for a big stage where you want to dominate with that bright sound. It's fantastic but I'm not that kind of drummer at all. The Big Beats definitely were better for me and I loved the darker sound. For a while I had both full sets around my drums so I could go back and forth between them. I just changed the hi-hats once and a while preferring the Big Beat 16" hats. Then at the recommendation of a local drum shop, I found the Formula 602 Classics to be a little more lively and better suited to my tastes and ear. With the 602s my journey was largely over. They just had better tonality that worked for me. Excellent rock cymbals without being brash. Still powerful yet more balanced and sophisticated. The Modern 602s are similar would be worth checking out too. Probably a little easier to find. (I'm still working through selling various remaining Paiste cymbals on Reverb. All in excellent condition.)

My typically setup would be a 22" ride (sometimes 24"), 20" & 18" crashes and a 15" hi-hat. The drums used are DW Drums with a 6.5x14 snare, 9x13 rack, 13x15 floor, 14x18 floor and a18x23 kick. A little bigger than average drums and I felt these sizes all worked together.
 
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wye

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547
Similar experiences like above, 2002, Rudes and Signature series are quite brutal, loud, higher pitched, long sustain.

You have to play in a context, where you need this cut, otherwise way too loud, trebly and glassy for me....typical b8 sound, zingy, glassy, clinical.

I prefer b 20 alloy: 602 and even better 602 modern essentials, because they infused the 602 me with a little complexity and very slight china Paiste Traditional (b12) sound, which is a bit Paiste‘s version of the Zildjian Contantinople sound, i.e. chinalike, dirtier. I prefer 16 and 18 inch modern essentials, because they are deeper in pitch than 2002, big beat......

The older etched logo Paiste traditional seem to be a little more complex, did not like brand new cymbals of this line in a shop, preferred my etched logo 16 crash and former 20 medium light ride. The b12 alloy is very easily bent and a bit delicate.

You have to like the added glassy sound of Paiste, even with b12 and b20 alloy, my favorite rock ride cymbal is a Bfd 3 sample of an old 24 inch giant beat in evil drums, unfortunately never experienced a vintage one. Did not like the new ones I played.
A real favorite of mine is also my older Paiste Dark Crash 20 ride of the Master series for Jazz and funk, next to my new Frank Gegerle 22 ride which destroyed all other jazz ride I experienced it delivers slightly damped....
From a rock perspective for vintage b8 nerds


Again, did not like the reissues....quite difficult to find vintage giant beats, even Europe.
 
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Hulakatt

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Are you saying the 602's or the Paiste Traditionals are like Zildjians Constantinople line?
 

wye

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547
Sorry, the Paiste traditional b12 line is similar to the Constantinople line....a bit more glassy....602 (louder, less complex, less China than traditional) kind of a bridge between rock and Jazz...
The masters line is less midrangey, thin and very airy, low volume....

In the video above around 22:20 is also a bit cool vintage 602 content, even a 602 owned by Joe Morello, again, I never played vintage Paistes.

That said I like most Constantinoples better than Paiste Traditionals, but both are very weak compared to Frank Gegerle tuned, modded Agop Anniversary in Jazz terms....if you like an old k sound,

Very strange the Zildjian videos comparing their old vintage Avedis and vintage Ks with their reissues, quite a fail in my perception.
 
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Blix

Norwegian
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25,245
I've been at their factory in Switzerland, stayed at a hotel in beautiful Lucerne. Friendly folks. Sorry that's all I got. :p. Used to work at the Norwegian Paiste importer back in the late 90s.
 

msquared

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
371
They're great cymbals. I put their sound as being very appropriate for modern rock or pop. As mentioned earlier, the sound has a lot of high frequency information and they sound "glassy".

Like with most manufacturers, the various lines will have different characteristics and the overall sound has evolved over time.
 
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DrumBob

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17,111
Lots of good information. I have been playing Paistes for years and prefer the Signature series. One thing that I don't think was mentioned is that most Paiste cymbals are cut from high quality sheet metal alloy, not cast like Zildjian, Sabian, and most other cymbals. As a result, Paistes are much more uniform from cymbal to cymbal within any given series. I chalk that up to legendary Swiss precision manufacturing. The Byzance series was Paiste's attempt to create and market a Turkish-style cymbal, and I believe they succeeded. They are very nice cymbals that are cast in the traditional manner in Turkey and finished in Germany.

If you are looking for glassy, higher pitched cymbals, Paiste has always done that better than any other anyone else, IMO.

One thing I find maddening about Paiste is they change their lines too often. If you are using a Paiste cymbal you like and break one, you may have to search to find a replacement if the line has been discontinued. I bought a great Paiste Twenty series 20" ride a couple years ago on closeout and now, they're gone.
 

wye

Member
Messages
547
If you need soundfiles, I have hundreds of Bfd and Superior 3.0 cymbals (very few traditionals) and can record/compare my real cymbals.....
The Paiste website has a very cool comparison room to the left side down on the page....
For whatever reason they also call their traditional b12 line now signature traditional, they are brutally different from the signature line.....

Playing feel (if that matters) is mostly harder and less buttery than Zildjian, Masters line is buttery...played only 10 masters line, did only really like my older dark/crash ride 20 ride of this line...the Body of the tone is missing IMHO.

I am not that much into Paiste hi-hats, very cool, controlled closed and slightly open (especially 602 me) but lacking body and character open....kind of lean.

I really like 602 (me) for immediate bloom/crash kind of without latency feel...will eventually buy a 16 signature fast crash which is even faster and higher pitched to compliment my very 16 and 18 modern essentials and very cool 22 modern essential ride...which is my preferred rock and louder blues setup.
 
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HERSCHEL

Member
Messages
5,494
I find Paiste to always be my first choice, Yeah, the line changes can be annoying, but I find I like and could use a set, or even mix-and-match across almost all but their cheapest lines. With Zildjians, for example, I love Ks, though they can be inconsistent, As are fine, but really generic, IMO, and their budget lines are garbage. I dislike cymbal shopping where eight different rides of the same spec all sound different and none really what I want. With Paiste I usually get the sound I want with any of them even sight unseen.
 

Drewboy

Member
Messages
646
I remember my older brother buying his first drum kit that was an old Rogers set with mixed cymbals. That 18” Paiste colorsound black crash is still one of the best I heard. I seen they reissued them a few years ago. Would def get it I was a working drummer.
 

slayerbear17

Member
Messages
2,954
I became a huge fan of Paiste when I discovered my drummer using them. The 2002 series really stand out. Crisp, bright but not to bright, a few comments they couldn't go the distance in terms of cracking or key holing. Just use proper hitting technique.


I really want to get the 2002 15 high hats but I do love my Zildjian Z's.

I love the the Black Alpha Joey jordinson cymbal, love the bell, love the dark attack.

Stay away from the PST series.
 

MatrixClaw

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
49
I love the Traditional and Signature lines. Was always afraid the 2002s would be too bright for me since I've never been a fan of A Customs, AAX, etc. I was wrong. 2002s are amazing. They are everything bright cymbals should sound like. However, they don't mix well with B20 cymbals, you could maybe get by with some 15" 2002 hats, but mixing crashes, the 2002 will kill your other cymbals in volume and cut.
 




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