Taylor 714CE Repair

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by ejennings, May 8, 2015.

  1. ejennings

    ejennings Supporting Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Location:
    Harbor City, CA
    Hey gents,

    this is my first post on TGP despite being a member for the last two years. That being said I've gained a ton of knowledge and gear (lol) over these past two years. Got a question for the masses. I build Ukuleles and I am prepping to build my first guitar in the coming months so I am no stranger to wood but am no expert either....

    hmmm...where to start....

    In 2011 while on a missions trip to Samoa my Taylor 714CE (built in 2005) was run over and as a result the headstock was cracked.

    [​IMG]

    fastforward to last week. I pulled it out of the case and seeing as I had some time on my hands I fixed it. Cleaned it, bonded it with titebond, and clamped it nice and snug and let it cure for 24 hours and it came out great.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I did a bit of sanding and unless you really look for the it, you would never know that it had been repaired. I am currently pore filling the rosewood and about to lay down some sealer and then nitro, but thats for a different set of questions.

    A buddy of mine asked me the other day, "are you sure that it will hold under pressure?" I told him, "of course" BUT as has happened too many times, the question caused me to doubt a bit.


    I was thinking in terms of reinforcement, to drill .125" holes in-between each tuner hole (in 3 locations) and inserting bonding .125" carbon fiber rods. But not sure if it even needs to be reinforced. The headstock thickness is +.600"

    What do you guys think? Does it even need to be reinforced? If so, what would be a good method to accomplish that? Please let the opinions and advice flood in. Appreciate your time and advice. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Ron Daniels

    Ron Daniels Member

    Messages:
    46
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2015
    Location:
    Kitchener, Ontario Canada
    In a guitar as nice as the Taylor, I would only go with CF if you could hide it while maintaining an OEM look.

    I can think of two ways...

    1 - drill from within the tuner holes and insert the rods from that side, then trim them by re-reaming the holes.

    2 - sand off the headstock veneer. Place an epoxy-wetted carbon fibre cloth in it's place, then a new headstock veneer that's the same wood and quality as the original.

    Clamp it all between two flat pieces of wood and let it cure.

    You now have an "invisible" layer of carbon fiber between your veneer and the headstock. Unfortunately, since there's only veneer on the front, you can't do it on the back and hide it.

    Too bad, a piece of 7/16 styrofoam with 1 layer of CF cloth on either side of it is incredibly strong. A piece of wood with the same treatment would be remarkably so!
     
  3. B. Howard

    B. Howard Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2013
    Location:
    Magnolia DE
    I repair these type things all the time. The break looked nice and clean and I do not see much of the glue line on the repaired piece so I would not think it needs any reinforcement. The only thing to watch for is if the break ran through any of the tuner mount screw holes, if it did make sure to properly pilot drill and use plenty of wax on the screw so you do not stress the joint.
     
  4. ejennings

    ejennings Supporting Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Location:
    Harbor City, CA
    Thanks for the input Ron. I work in composites and while it would be awesome to remove the rosewood veneer and layup some CF and even lay down several plies and have a carbon fiber veneer with a Taylor inlay (sweet!) its a bit more invasive than I want to go, at least for now.
     
  5. ejennings

    ejennings Supporting Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Location:
    Harbor City, CA
    BHoward,

    Thanks for the advice and the reassurance of the strength of the repair. I'm almost positive that it will be fine, but when my buddy questioned me about it, it left just enough doubt to cause me to be skeptical. It helps having the reassurance of a taylor authorized repair person.

    I was thinking about going with GOTOH 510 tuners, but they are way more money than I want to spend at the moment. So I am gonna put some new Taylor tuners on it which have no screws but those hidden pin holes. But if I put other tuners on it I will be sure to use the correct size pilot holes and wax the screws. I didn't even know that I should use wax. Does it matter what kind of wax I use? Thanks
     
  6. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

    Messages:
    14,567
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Location:
    PNW
    It looks like a good repair now, I would not do any more pinning or screwing.
     
  7. Barnzy

    Barnzy Member

    Messages:
    3,056
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    Location:
    London On
    Could you get a new neck from Taylor? It's a bolt-on NT neck... ( sorry to take the fun out of a repair....)
     
  8. ejennings

    ejennings Supporting Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Location:
    Harbor City, CA
    Yea, I could, but they want $700 for a new one and they won't sell it to me direct have to have an authorized Taylor person buy it and install it. Probably cost about $800 when its all said and done. For that I could save up a bit more and buy one of these Eastmans that I keep hearing about.
     
  9. B. Howard

    B. Howard Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2013
    Location:
    Magnolia DE
    I use bees wax but the type doesn't matter that much. It is to lube the threads so they won't split the wood. You can use a bar of soap as well.
     
  10. Scott Auld

    Scott Auld Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,909
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2007
    Location:
    Broward
    Titebond? I think it stronger now than it was before it broke. The lateral shear stress of the strings that will be putting along the break going towards the body of the guitar are not going to break that bond
     
  11. ejennings

    ejennings Supporting Member

    Messages:
    49
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Location:
    Harbor City, CA
    Awesome, Thanks BHoward and Scott. Appreciate the info and the reassurances.
     

Share This Page