TC Electronic D-2

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by davidkim1221, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. davidkim1221

    davidkim1221 Member

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    What do you guys think this delay rack with using it with guitar? And how would you guys incorporate this with guitar pedals and a furman power supply? Would you use a pedal power supply for the guitar pedals in the rack and then plug the pedal power into the furman?
     
  2. AnalogKid85

    AnalogKid85 Member

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    A lot of guitarists have gotten great use out of the D2 in their rigs--Andy Summers springs to mind, as he used it as his dedicated delay processor on the Police reunion tour. Phil Collen from Def Leppard has two in his rig, I'm guessing for having two independent delay times--since you can only have 1 delay line--but many delay times (mutlitaps)--in each one. It really is a great delay processor, but probably worth it only if you're going to be playing in stereo, as most of its features really lend itself well to playing in a stereo rig and providing a wide, spatial delay. The modulation, dynamic delay and rhythm delay patterns can be used in any rig, but the more "spatial enhancing" features--phase reversal, panning delay and L&R offset--really only work in stereo. If you do have a stereo setup though, this might be one of the best dedicated delays you could buy. Some things that really stick out (in a good way) on the D2 for me:

    -- L&R offset - if your rig is set up carefully enough with mixers and splitters, you could kill the dry signal on one side completely and replace it with a delay from 5 ms to about 30ms and get a much bigger stereo image (John Petrucci uses this trick in Dream Theater live, with a 7ms spread). Add modulation and it's instant 80s arena rock! I do this all the time with my Intellifex, but it would not sound nearly as nice as the D2 since the converters are so "ancient" -- the D2's converters will be much better and produce a delay that is close enough to the original sound that it would sound like a true split.

    -- Tapped rhythm delays - you can tap in up to 10 delay times for a multitap pattern, and quantize the taps so they match up closer to a tempo you've already tapped in beforehand, and afterwards you can go in and tweak the tap times manually. I have checked the manual and I don't think it will do the Lukather/PCM70 "Circular Delay" (not enough volume control over each tap), but you could make something very similar with it.

    -- Sine/Triangle waveforms - a lot of chorus and delay processors only allow for sine waves, and the ability to choose a Triangle wave along with the phase reversal could yield some very Roland Dimension D-style chorus sounds, or just Dimension D-style modulation on the delay repeats.

    -- relay tap tempo input - you can plug in a Boss FS-5U into your D-Two and be good to go for tapping in delay times, no MIDI required. Some guys really don't like this because they like to have the ability to set the tempo with MIDI clock, but if you use mostly pedals--and especially other delay pedals that can take external tap switches--the D-Two would integrate just fine with your rig. I've seen some people on here get special adapters so they can use a tap switch to set 2 delay pedals at the same time with different rhythmic subdivisions for each pedal, and that would definitely work here with this too.

    --feedback number of taps - I can't think of really any other delay processor at the moment that allows for this (well, Eventide probably does), and it could be pretty useful, especially if you need a delay with exactly 3 taps right away--no need to mess with the feedback parameters and the delay times while you're trying to dial in the perfect delay, just enter the number of taps and you're done.

    As far as tone suckage goes, I've never used one, but I remember somebody on here or HRI said that it was best to use one with a mixer, and I'm pretty sure that it is not on par with the G-System for tonal integrity since it is much older. I would use one with a splitter and a mixer, personally, because it would allow me to mix other delays and effects along with it in parallel.

    I don't know what your setup is like, but if you don't already have a splitter and a mixer--and you don't feel like getting those either--you could get many of the D-Two's features in a pedal like the Eventide Timefactor or the Strymon Timeline, both of which have lots of features you can't find in the D-Two. For example, both of those pedals offer delay spillover in one form or another, while if you want to do that with your D2, you will have to set it up just right with a mixer and another delay processor to get that going. On the other hand, neither of those pedals will offer the same fine control over the Spatial parameters, and you might have problems trying to create a delay that pans, ducks, modulates, offsets and phase reverses, and quantizes, all at the same time. If you are really drawn to the rhythm delay feature, the Digitech Timebender has something similar, albeit a stripped-down version with 6 taps instead of 10, and not as much fine control (I believe all 6 taps will come out as the same volume as well).

    As far as the power requirements go, I would imagine that Fuhrman power conditioners can support one or two Pedal Powers but I really don't have any experience using either one of those yet. Someone will chime in here, I'm sure.
     
  3. davidkim1221

    davidkim1221 Member

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    Whew thanks for the specific response! Yeah I'm planning to utilize the d2 with a fender hot rod and a ac15; heard this unit really shines when used stereo. Which is awesome i'm sure! Mainly as of now i'm using pedals instead of racks but honestly I would just use pedals and then use just the d2 rack effect and a furman power supply for the rack section, and maybe put couple of boosts that I leave on all the time and then probably my dmm for extra echo that I don't really need to turn off. So yeah; I really like the tap rhythm function, i'm sure i'll get crazy amounts of cool ideas out of it...

    I also have a question regarding it's live use. I know you can save presets on it, so basically when you change the delay time from different songs, you would just simply change the presets on the unit right? And also, on the tap tempo; would you plug the boss tap into the "pedal" section of the d2 on the back? And also can you use any other tap tempo pedal other than the boss one? Thanks for the reply
     
  4. AnalogKid85

    AnalogKid85 Member

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    OK now that I know what amps you're working with, I have a few questions:

    -- do both of your amps have serial effects loops?
    -- what does your signal chain look like? how do you run all of your pedals into the amps?
    -- could you live with using the preamp from one amp (Hot Rod or AC-15) feeding the poweramps on both?
    -- how much extra $$$ would you be willing to spend on top of the D2 to make this work? (splitter, mixer, MIDI, etc.)

    I don't know how your rig is setup right now, but if you lay out the exact signal chain I could give you a much better answer of how to set it up. If your amps have parallel effects loops, you could probably get away with not using a mixer and be fine, but there will be pros and cons involved with any particular setup.

    As far as the tap tempo switch goes, it could probably accept any regular tap switch you could hook up to a Boss DD-5/DD-7, and probably a bunch of others too--you might have to experiment with that one. I'm guessing any non-latching switch would work, but I'm not familiar enough with those to give a definite yes/no.

    As far as switching sounds around on the D2 goes, there are 3 ways I can think of off the top of my head:

    (1) preset switching
    (2) expression pedal (w/multiple parameter control)
    (3) tap tempo

    What's great is, if you have all the MIDI set up, you can use all three of these together. With (1), you could switch between totally different types of presets (one preset on regular ping-pong delay, and maybe another in rhythm delay mode), with (2) you could change multiple parameters at once (using different parameter values at heel and toe positions on the pedal--bring up volume and modulation at the same time, for instance), and (3) of course you can use at any time, on any preset. I really like delays that can do all three of these things (whether rack or pedal--Digitech Timebender even does all 3 of these) because you get much more "mileage" and flexibility out of your presets--not only can you change tempos on the fly, but you can alter so many features of the delay (tone, modulation, feedback, spatial, etc.) with the expression pedal, making it much more useful for jams than just a Boss DD-2 pedal (which sounds great, but is not nearly as flexible when you need to change things on the fly!).

    The D2 would be a great addition to your setup, but will probably require some extra legwork to really get it working! You will definitely spend over $500 to buy one and all the accessories to get it working in the ways I described--if you plan on getting some more rack gear in the future for this setup, though, that might not be such a bad thing. There are some great alternatives out there too that would accomplish many of the same things--for instance, a TC SCF pedal in front of both amps to spread the sound out spatially (a la Eric Johnson) and a Timebender/Timefactor/Timeline in the loops of both amps for delays. TC SCF+Timebender, for one, can definitely be done for under $500 used, so if money is an issue, it's definitely something to think about!
     

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