Technical question about modelers...

Discussion in 'Digital & Modeling Gear' started by metropolis_4, Jan 12, 2016.

  1. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    I've been curious about this for a while:

    I know some companies offering digital guitar amps are using proprietary in-house code, but do they all do this, or are there common libraries/sources they are pulling their code from to develop their digital models? Or is development outsourced to common third parties?

    Do companies like Fender, Vox, Digitech, etc. all have in-house development teams that are building their companies digital models from scratch? Or are they using a common source for base code and algorithms? (Sort of like how several guitar companies have their guitars all built by the same factory but have different labels put on them.)
     
  2. MoPho

    MoPho International Man of Leisure Silver Supporting Member

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    Was wondering the same thing BUMP
     
  3. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    If there was any company using common sources, I would be stunned it they were willing to share that information with you.
    -
    Austin
     
  4. VCuomo

    VCuomo Member

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    I would imagine that it's a combination of both standard libraries that come with the compiler (and, possibly, standard vendor libraries for the DSP) along with each company's proprietary application code (that's where the "magic" happens).
     
  5. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    Why? Outsourcing parts of production to third party vendors is hardly a major trade secret. Especially when it comes to technology.

    How many amp manufacturers make their own proprietary in-house tubes and speakers?

    Is it a big secret that Fender uses Jensen speakers in it's amps?

    Besides, if there are common vendor libraries, then it's not just up to the companies using them to guard that information; the vendor is a company trying to make a profit too and they have the right to advertise their own products.


    That's what makes the most sense to me. But even in the application code I wonder how much is really done in house. It just seems a little too convenient that most companies end up with such similar lineups in their offerings...
     
  6. cliffc8488

    cliffc8488 Member

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    Most DSP compilers include library functions for common signal processing functions. However every library I've seen makes the same mistakes in several important and oft-used functions. I can't disclose what functions and what those mistakes are but because of this we use our own hand-coded assembly functions for our own libraries. The results are measurable and audible especially when dealing with the special requirements of amp modeling.

    I should add that these libraries are low-level functions like FFT() and such. You're not going to find a library that implements a Tube Screamer or even something more granular like a diode clipping circuit. That all has to be developed in-house.
     
  7. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    Cool, thanks for chiming in!

    So the libraries that are available are specific to the compiler itself?

    I'm kind of surprised nobody has thought of bundling code to offer pre-built low-level components (higher level than things like fourier transforms, but simple components like tone stacks, etc.). Sort of like what has been done with JS frameworks in web development.

    It seems like a product that would lower the cost of entry into the DSP market would be worth a lot to the right companies. Especially when the indications are that the digital market is going to continue to expand and, most likely, surpass the market for things like tube amps.
     

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