Tele Experts -- Ash/Rosewood?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by SFLP, Jan 18, 2008.

  1. SFLP

    SFLP Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I know that there has been debate about ash/rosewood as a combination and that Suhr's website says it has too much "sizzle" for most players.

    It seems like Fender makes a fair number of teles with this combination though. Thus, I am wondering whether the combination is considered more desireable for a tele as opposed to a strat.

    I realize all guitars are different but am curious if the tele experts have any specific experiences with this combination and, if so, whether they would recommend it. I love the feel of rosewood and the looks of ash with a blonde finish.
     
  2. studiodunn

    studiodunn Member

    Messages:
    2,522
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    LB, Ca.
    I think maple is really key in getting "that Jangle"from a tele.
     
  3. Drew816

    Drew816 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,669
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Location:
    Raccoon City
    Swamp Ash and Rosewood for me thanks, the perfect combo for 'my tastes.' I had a '66 Transition Logo in this combo that was 'perfect' and I foolishly sold it years ago and I just had a K-Line built to those specs because that was THE Tele for me. Now I had a lot of non-standard features I wanted like a 1 5/8 nut width, mid-C profile neck with 12" radius, double notched vintage style bridge, Lollar Specials, and a tummy cut; but less demanding folks could find quite a few Tele's in this combo (or any variation there of!). Here she is and I'm LOVING this guitar!

    [​IMG]
     
  4. SFLP

    SFLP Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I guess what I am really wondering though is not whether I should get a maple neck, but whether I should get an ash or alder body to go with a rosewood neck. Thanks for any input.
     
  5. jamison162

    jamison162 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,778
    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Location:
    FL
    Mmmm, yum. Speaking of ash and rosewood...I happen to have a Grosh RC in ash with brazilian rosewood board. On the way...gotta be soon, I'm anxious.
     
  6. Mike T

    Mike T Member

    Messages:
    897
    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    My Tele is Alder and Rosewood and I love it, but the Strat I built is Ash and Rosewood and for a Srat, it does it for me. I have Bardens on both. I would definitely consider Ash and Rosewood for a Tele.
     
  7. jads57

    jads57 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,355
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Location:
    St.Paul,Mn.
    The other consideration is semi hollow ash which G&L Asat offers w/ classic Tele p/up configuaration. I love mine,it originally it had a maple /rosewood neck which I swapped w/ another player for his all maple neck. I only swapped because his neck was slightly larger than mine. I think I prefer the rosewood, but not by much. Hope that helps.
     
  8. Berlin Chris

    Berlin Chris Member

    Messages:
    1,127
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    It´s hard to answer your question. I think everybody has made their own experience with certain wood combinations. That being said, I think that a rosewood board works better with an alder body in a T-style guitar. It gives a nice, warm and full sound with a slightly slower attack than the ash/maple combo.
     
  9. jimmyj

    jimmyj Member

    Messages:
    5,149
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2002
    Location:
    Brookings, SD
    It's going to vary from tele to tele but I had a Muddy Waters model Tele that is ash/rosewood. Very nice clear but round tone and very tele.
    I probably should have kept it but a friend asked to buy it so I sold it. :(
     
  10. straightblues

    straightblues Member

    Messages:
    8,970
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Location:
    The LBC
    Teles need to be Ash or Pine. Alder is for strats.
     
  11. japhy

    japhy Member

    Messages:
    305
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    I used to have a real slab board / ash '61 Tele . It had a VERY light body and I have never met another tele that sounded as good as that thing did.
    I've been thru 10 Teles since and have never liked any as much as that one.
    I sold it 11 years ago to a great player and used the money as a down payment on my house. But man , I miss that guitar.
     
  12. SFLP

    SFLP Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Thanks for all of the input.
     
  13. Fingers

    Fingers Member

    Messages:
    702
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Location:
    NYC
    I have a Suhr T-style with ash body & African rosewood fingerboard (maple neck) which sounds cool to me, & when I was working out the specs on the phone with John, he never tried to discourage me from that combination. Of course I was probably clear about liking highs.
     
  14. K-Line

    K-Line Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,039
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Location:
    St. Louis, Missourah
    Ash/Rosewood Tele= Pure Heaven! The rosewood softens the twang a bit but this combo in the bridge position is the best spank.
     
  15. lclyman

    lclyman Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ash/rosewood combo on my esquire...love it...!!
     
  16. johan

    johan Member

    Messages:
    2,550
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Sweden
  17. Tramp

    Tramp Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,118
    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Location:
    To and Fro... Mostly Fro
    My Anderson Hollow T Classic is has an ash top on an alder base, with a rosewood board. I'd call it more woody than bright, but it's a great tone! Interestingly, I spoke with the Suhr folks about replicating this combo in a guitar with SSC and was discouraged from combining ash with rosewood. My guess is that pickups play a huge role in determining how well the combo works. The Anderson SA pickup in the middle position of my guitar (a so-called Pete Anderson model) seems like it's made for these woods, but I can imagine others wouldn't.
     
  18. Stubee

    Stubee Member

    Messages:
    184
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2007
    Get whatever ya like. My first Fender was a '73 Ash/Maple Strat, sounded fine. Now I've got a MIM '50s Classic Tele (ash body), has Nocasters. I've had two different maple necks on it plus a RW neck. All sounded fine. I've got a '60s Classic Tele, stock Alder/RW. Sounds great. Put two different maple necks on it, too, just for kicks. Just fine. I have an alder/maple & alder/RW necked Strat, both sound neat.

    My favorite guitar right now is an AV '62RI Tele, which is of course Alder/RW. Sounds just peachy.

    These guitars do not all sound the same, nor am I claiming there's no difference between a maple & RW board in sound (though if there is, it hasn't shown itself to me too much in all the above neck swaps). All I mean is not to get too hung up on "what's right".

    IME, I can make any of these guitars sound a heckuva lot like any of the others if I fiddle with the guitar & amp tone controls. I think those adjustments, plus pickups & pickup height adjustments, impact tone a lot.
     
  19. frostbitefalls

    frostbitefalls Member

    Messages:
    303
    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    I would think "too much sizzle" is more about pickups than wood combinations. Once you have a solid idea of the tone you're after, and have selected pups designed to produce that tone, the wood combination refines that sound further. My current favorite tele's (of several) are both ash bodies; one has a one-piece maple neck with the Lollar GVCG pups, and my very favorite has a very lightweight ash body with maple/EIR neck and Glendale/Amalfitano pups. These are partscasters, whose pieces were matched to give a solid, meaty tone, with less of what I think of as a "Bakersfield twang" sound. I will probably change the bodies with each other, as the heavier body sustains better, but that's a story for another time. It's probably on over-simplification, but it seems to me pickups create tone, and tonewoods (we're discussing electrics only) refine it.
     

Share This Page