tele owners...what's up with tele bridges?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by pickaguitar, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. pickaguitar

    pickaguitar 2011 TGP Silver Medalist Silver Supporting Member

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    On the Glendale website some bridges have 'cuts' and others don't...
    What's the pros/cons on the differences/playability?

    (note...I have not played many teles and I'm contemplating building one - partstele)

    doublecut:
    [​IMG]

    Vs.

    nocut:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. pickaguitar

    pickaguitar 2011 TGP Silver Medalist Silver Supporting Member

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    Is a nocut just a 'hand rest'? Does a nocut one get in the way of strumming?
     
  3. ReddRanger

    ReddRanger Supporting Member

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    The cut is supposed to come in handy if you do a lot of finger or chicken pickin' down on the bridge.

    For me, I've never needed that and the regular bridge works just fine on my Tele.
     
  4. Hecks

    Hecks Member

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    Yeah, if you like to pick a lot between the bridge pickup and the saddles it keeps you from picking the side of the bridge.

    I do this a lot but I just rest the palm of my hand on the back of the bridge and I don't really have a problem in hitting the side by mistake.

    I think the "cut" is a good idea but not necessary or an improvement of the standard uncut bridge.
     
  5. Mark 63

    Mark 63 Silver Supporting Member

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    The rail was originally designed as part of the ash-tray structure. Although very few people use the ash tray (Albert Collins kept it on), some do like the ridge as a palm rest.

    My tele hasn't had this kind of plate in years, so when I play one with the ridge it feels weird.
     
  6. Redfish

    Redfish Member

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    If you are starting from scratch it just makes sense to get the cut bridge. I've had both and while the standard bridge never bothered me for many years, once I had one that was cut down it's tough to go back.
     
  7. Kingbeegtrs

    Kingbeegtrs Senior Member

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    I personally prefer the American Standard bridge plate with no edges. Maybe it is because that is what I learned to play on...I'm just used to it and it's comfortable to me.

    I found these: http://www.projectconsultants.com/GTsadllesPages/gt623series.htm

    I put them on my american standard tele and I love them. They're really nice and I think they will work on a strat too.
     
  8. Drew816

    Drew816 Supporting Member

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    Cut Tele bridges rule, I can't stand the standard Tele bridge myself. Those sides just get in my way but for those 'used to' the old standard it's probably not an issue.

    I use a Fender Cut Rail version with compensated brass saddles, a lot less expensive than a Glendale but I've heard good things about them as well...
     
  9. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    It's known as the Gatton cut since he is the first one who popularized it.

    It's meant for hybrid players who use their fingers in addition to the pick since that edge can get in the way.

    I favor them.
     
  10. WildeStarr

    WildeStarr Member

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    My tele bridge. Gotta have a HB in there!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Jellecaster

    Jellecaster Member

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    If you're not a Tele player and are just building one for the first time, I would recommend against Glendale. Not because they aren't just about the best bridges made -they are AWESOME. But the Glendale bridgeplates cost about $100 and the saddles are another $50.

    You can get a very nice Wilkinson bridge with compensated saddles for around $30.
     
  12. Jammin'John

    Jammin'John Member

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    Good advice.
    You don't even know if you like tele's yet.
    Tele's were meant to be inexpensive pro insruments.
    Now some peope spend 2 - 3 thousand dollars on 'em.
    Play it a while.

    JJ
     
  13. Polynitro

    Polynitro Member

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    Id go with the trad one first, you can get the same bridge and saddles as on the 52RI and Nocaster for about $50. You may not need the cut.
     
  14. Polynitro

    Polynitro Member

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    :tapedshut
     

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