Tele sitar sound.

amstrtatnut

Member
Messages
12,183
The barrel bridge on my tele bridge emits a sitar sound on B string.

First I sanded it and could not fix then, flipped it in hopes that whatever the problem is would not happen on both sides. Still rings.

Thinking about ditching the barrel bridge system and going with something else.

Anyone done this and been happier? Not thrilled with the idea of zingy sounding steel. Maybe graph tech or something?
 

Blix

Supporting Member
Messages
24,912
I had that issue with the Rutters brass saddles, replaced them with a set of Gotoh In-Tune and never an issue since.
 

KGWagner

Member
Messages
3,243
The side of the nut facing the speaking length of the string(s) has to be square to the strings, or you'll get the dreaded "sitar" sound. There's a good article on it here, if you're interested, but essentially a cut-away side view of the nut slot should look something like this...


If the green line is the string, the yellow the nut, and the "horn shape" imaginary, the speaking length of the string is to the left and the tuner to the right.

Oddly enough, if that square edge isn't proper, the singing/sitar sound can sometimes seem to be coming from the bridge. I'm not sure why, but I suspect it has something to do with the way vibrations/harmonics move up and down the string, causing sympathetic vibrations in other places. Kinda like "referred pain", where spinal problems cause pain in unrelated/uninjured areas of your body.
 

morglan

Member
Messages
1,508
The side of the nut facing the speaking length of the string(s) has to be square to the strings, or you'll get the dreaded "sitar" sound. There's a good article on it here, if you're interested, but essentially a cut-away side view of the nut slot should look something like this...


If the green line is the string, the yellow the nut, and the "horn shape" imaginary, the speaking length of the string is to the left and the tuner to the right.

Oddly enough, if that square edge isn't proper, the singing/sitar sound can sometimes seem to be coming from the bridge. I'm not sure why, but I suspect it has something to do with the way vibrations/harmonics move up and down the string, causing sympathetic vibrations in other places. Kinda like "referred pain", where spinal problems cause pain in unrelated/uninjured areas of your body.
Never knew this, thanks for posting it.
 

amstrtatnut

Member
Messages
12,183
The side of the nut facing the speaking length of the string(s) has to be square to the strings, or you'll get the dreaded "sitar" sound. There's a good article on it here, if you're interested, but essentially a cut-away side view of the nut slot should look something like this...


If the green line is the string, the yellow the nut, and the "horn shape" imaginary, the speaking length of the string is to the left and the tuner to the right.

Oddly enough, if that square edge isn't proper, the singing/sitar sound can sometimes seem to be coming from the bridge. I'm not sure why, but I suspect it has something to do with the way vibrations/harmonics move up and down the string, causing sympathetic vibrations in other places. Kinda like "referred pain", where spinal problems cause pain in unrelated/uninjured areas of your body.
Thanks. I tgink I fixed it.
 

Jahn

Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver
Supporting Member
Messages
28,323
You can also stuff some foam under the string behind the nut to dampen some odd vibrations.
 

Dana Olsen

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,901
Update: Installed saddles and B string still does the sitar thing. I guess Ill sand the nut. I dont think its the nut. Dunno what else it could be.
Maybe take your guitar to Bruce McMillan at The Music Connection over on East Ave. He's a real good set up cat and a real good Tele player - he may have some insights. He's not expensive either.

Hope this helps, Dana

PS If I was there, I'd just ask you to bring it over and we could beat our heads together on it!
 

Tone_Terrific

Supporting Member
Messages
31,514
In general slide something like a round toothpick under the string just ahead of the nut to raise it in the slot to eliminate that source of problem when troubleshooting.
 




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