Tele steel saddles

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by J Purcell, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. J Purcell

    J Purcell Member

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    Are any of you Tele players using steel saddles? If so what kind and how do you like them compared to brass?
    Thanks for any info.
    John
     
  2. Chris Rice

    Chris Rice Member

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    I have steel on two (one Fender and one Rice) guitars. The Fender has a late 60's set and the Rice has a Glendale set. They have a quicker attack with a different midrange emphasis than brass saddles. "Steelier" comes to mind. ;)
     
  3. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

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    I have some Glendale steel saddles. Haven't used them yet though. Lost all momentum on the project, but I'm working up new plans for them.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. cacibi

    cacibi Member

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    I've got heat-treated stainless steel saddles (Glendale) on my b-benders. IMHO they are a little more balanced EQ-wise, with more mids. My take on brass is that it emphasizes the lows and highs while steel provides more of a 'normalized' EQ.
     
  5. bluesrules

    bluesrules Member

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    I found the complete opposite!

    On my tele's anyways. I had no mids with the cheaper factory steel saddles, plenty of low's and Ice Pick highs. When I put on the compensated BRASS saddles. It sounded like a Tele again with that vintage Honk it was missing.

    Maybe the higher priced steel saddles are better. But I have 6 Tele's and only one more has to be swapped to brass yet. After I compare them, It's brass or nothing to me now.
     
  6. Dana Olsen

    Dana Olsen Gold Supporting Member

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    I replaced the stock threaded steel saddles on my '56 Esquire/ Tele conversion with Music One slotted steel saddles.

    It was a HUGE improvement in tone and sustain. Every guitar is different, but on my '56 the steel saddles have a strong mid, good lows and no ice pick highs. I'd be willing to try brass, or titanium, but I'm happy with the slotted steel ones - sounds great to me.

    Dana O.
     
  7. cacibi

    cacibi Member

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    To each their own....from the Glendale site:

    "Brass has a very nice balanced tone. Aluminum adds highs and cuts out mids without losing the low end. Stainless Steel adds a nice mid tone more pronounced than brass. ( funky Jerry Reed tone) Heat Treated Steel also adds a nice mid tone like the stainless but a little warmer. ( Bakersfield Roy Nichols and Don Rich tone) Titanium is a very light weight and hard material you might think it would sound similar to Aluminum, but the sound is much more similar to Brass and also adds a little sparkle to the high end."
     
  8. Jim Collins

    Jim Collins Member

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    I try different things on different Teles, and let the individual guitars decide. One is a two-pickup Tele-clone, with ash body, round lam rosewood fretboard, and Lollar Vintage T pickups. Of all the combinations of Glendale stuff I've tried, this one prefers a non-magnetic stainless steel bridge plate, heat-treated steel D/G and B/E saddles, and an aluminum E/A saddle. This gives me more bite without being strident.

    The other is an Esquire-clone with ash body, round lam maple board, with a Lollar Vintage T bridge pickup. Of the Glendale components I've tried on this one, it prefers a Blackguard bridgeplate, with an aluminum E/A saddle and brass D/G and B/E saddles. When this guitar was a two-pickup guitar, it liked a stainless bridgeplate with the same saddles as the other guitar, but once I converted it to an Esquire, it needed a slight mellowing of the high end, which is why I went with the Blackguard plate and Twang saddles. (It still has LOADS of twang.)
     
  9. Mike Duncan

    Mike Duncan Staff Member

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    I've got Glendale steels on my '62 RI. I love the crisp / snappy tone the steel has.
     
  10. pjwill

    pjwill Silver Supporting Member

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    +1 on the "crispy/snappy" tone! I am a big fan of steel saddles... both threaded (difficult to get string spacing perfect) and slotted. I think that they have a faster attack and tend to accentuate highs without sacrificing lows. You will notice that a fair number of players will use brass for their DG and BE strings and use steel on their low E/A strings for added snap and highs on the low strings.
     
  11. Droptop

    Droptop Supporting Member

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    How do the Glendale's compare to the Callaham's?
     

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