Tell me about Strandberg?

LaXu

Member
Messages
10,958
  • They look cool.
  • The Endurneck is needlessly angular. I have a more smoothed version of that profile on my Skervesen and it works massively better.
  • The bolt on heel goes too far up the neck and gets in the way. It's just a bad design.
  • The bridge action adjustment is a nightmare. You have to take off strings, adjust action which is imprecise compared to grub screws and then put the string back and retune. It is time consuming and just bad design.
  • Gigbags at these prices is a bit insulting.
  • The fanned fret scale difference between low and high strings has too little difference on 6 and 7 strings and a bit too much on 8 strings.
  • They often have very low quality figured tops unless you are talking about the highest end models like the Japanese ones.
I won't buy Strandberg because of the design issues and because they are overpriced for what they are.
 

Clyde Billt

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,121
Have any of you good people had the neck off at all?
Is it a hassle?
Does it go back on and into position well? (tuning, intonation stays set)

I am considering retiring my Steinberger Spirit as my travel guitar and I'm thinking the bolt on neck on the Strandberg would be handy.
I have weight restrictions on flights. The Strandberg is lighter than my Spirit and if the neck comes off and goes back on easy enough it will handy to split up into different bags.

What do you lot think, Strandberg is a feasible travel guitar?
 

AltecGreen

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,200
Ola deserves credit for sparking the current wave of headless guitars. He has created a new template for a modern guitar. With that comes competition and imitation.

The one key factor for deciding on a Strandberg is the neck. The design is patented so no direct copies (legal) although some makers like Skervesen have necks along the same lines but different enough to avoid lawsuits. I have seen one Japanese maker make a neck even more complex than the Endurneck.

With competition means choice. You have many alternatives to a Strandberg. Some are cheaper and some are more expensive. I was interested in a headless and went through this thought process.

An Indo Strandberg is literally the most expensive Indo made guitar with many of reports of inconsistency in QC. The upper end Indo guitars are over $3k USD with a few specific ones even higher while the basic models (US) start at $1600. My friends on guitar discord say that the best value is to try a B stock Strandbergs. One good thing about Strandbergs is that they seem to hold their value. Technically the lowest priced Strandberg is the import version RAS Lock signature model which can be bought for less that $1200 new but you'll have to live with an anime themed guitar. The Japnanese made version of the Lock guitar is over $5k usd.


If I'm buying say a $2.5 k USD Strandberg, I'm going to compare the fit and finish to other $2.5K guitars. From what I have seen, the Indo ones can be good but don't come close to to the fit and finish of a say a Saito S622. So it depends on what you value, quality or the design.

The Japanese Strandbergs solve the QC problem at the expense of a much higher price tag. Entry level MIJ J Standard Strandbergs are priced like $3800 and most are well over $4K. The J Customs go for $5K and up albeit with a real wood top. I've seen in person $12K J Custom Strandbergs.

At over $3k, you are in serious boutique guitar price territory and the quality has to match. The Indo ones just are not up to par. At $3k, many small boutique makers make a headless guitar that are much better made. These are also less than the made in Japan Strandbergs. I recently decided to try a headless but could not bring myself to buy a Strandberg so got this instead.

 
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dansut299

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
187
20210831_074622.jpg


All I play these days. Normal rounded necks just feel wrong now.
 

Meurig James

Member
Messages
23
I picked up a used Salen Butterscotch off Reverb as a replacement travel guitar for my Steinberger spirit that got lost/stolen from hotel storage.

I've been really blown away by it.
- I find the neck profile really comfortable and even helpful in guiding "correct" hand position discipline and find it fine for thumb over. (My favorite regular neck profile is the soft V on my PJE 96)
- Fan frets are relatively subtle and feel natural with no real adjustment needed, I've also not had any issue with the 20" radius (I'm used to 12 on all my other guitars)
- Fit and finish and fretwork is really nice and the SS frets are a nice touch (I raised the action up a little from how the prior owner had it
- I've found tuning stability and ease of changing strings to be great (So much better than the Steinberger Spirit)
-Sound/Tone wise I'm really enjoying it as well as its my first T-style and definitely a completely unique voice vs any of my other guitars - note the prior owner swapped out the original Suhr classic T pickups for Fralin steel pole 42 which have ballsy P90 like quality (I've not tried swapping back to the original PuPs)

As I said above I bought this purely as a travel guitar that I could take on a plane.
- Its a little bulkier than the Spirit it replaced but lighter and still fits in plane coat closets and overheads with no issue
- Its way more enjoyable to play than the Steinberger, and while I acknowledge I'm in the honeymoon phase I like it so much that I could see myself potentially going "full Strandberg" with a Boden Classic in the future

I did get a pretty decent deal on mine (especially factoring in the extra set of pickups), but I have no issue with the price given the uniqueness of the design and the overall quality and feel of the guitar and how well it serves my use case
 

greySky

Member
Messages
237
I'm curious whether anyone here has spent time with a strandberg and the ibanez ichika nito. They look really similar but I'm not sure if they're actually similar at all.

I did play a friend's indo Boden and it seemed like a great guitar. I think they're interesting but I actually miss the headstock. Maybe it would just take some time to get used to though.

Edit: I realize now that the ichika nito is single coils and not multiscale - I think to really compare ibanez with strandberg on this I meant the ibanez qx52.
 
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derekd

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
46,646
I spent time with a Sarah Longfield model right before the COVID shut down.

I'm pretty picky about necks and mostly like fat C profiles. I was pleasantly surprised by the Strandberg.

If I found a deal on a used Salen, I'd happily be an owner.

As far as made by Cort, they are capable of making a guitar on par with most other models. Everyone has to decide whether the price/quality works for them. The market will tell Ola if they are priced too high.
 

BigDoug1053

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,371
I wanted a headless 7 string with a good whammy - and that set of features is currently harder to find with all the downtuning in metal. I got a MII Boden Prog 7 and I think it's a great guitar that oozes quality. Compare with Ibanez Prestige MIJ guitars. The comments mentioning Steinberger are appropriate as it is a unique sort of design that is reminiscent of Ned's clever ideas. Mine has SS frets on an ebony board with a gentle 25.5 to 26.25" scale fan, and a laminated roasted maple neck. The neck is strange, but since I play with proper hand position, I adjusted very quickly. I gave the Fishman Fluence Moderns a good go, but I could not find decent clean tones with good treble response. The high gain settings were good, but no clean options that had the treble response I prefer. The Fluences are also battery hogs - I could barely get 2 hours on a 9V (they do offer a lithium rechargeable panel that subs as the control cavity cover). I switched out the Fluences for a Duncan JB/Jazz set with series-single-parallel switches, and now it's as versatile as my other guitars. Is it worth it? For me, yes. I bought mine new from MF.


 

scott

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,170
Cort are cheaper because of economy of scale.
I doubt Strandburg makes a tenth of the guitars cost produces per year.
 

northvanhalen

Member
Messages
254
Cort are cheaper because of economy of scale.
I doubt Strandburg makes a tenth of the guitars cost produces per year.
This. Cort can ghost build a guitar as high-spec or as thrifty as you want, depending on your budget and how many instruments you want.

I’d still like to try one, but they don’t have a lot of Canadian dealers, and none in Vancouver.
 

jco5055

Member
Messages
152
I have seen one Japanese maker make a neck even more complex than the Endurneck.

Who would that be if you don't mind me asking?
 

AltecGreen

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,200
Who would that be if you don't mind me asking?


I'll have to look because don't remember which maker. When I made that comment, I had just saw the twitter post with the guitar in question. My twitter feed is mostly Japanese bands or Japanese guitar makers.
 

jco5055

Member
Messages
152
I'll have to look because don't remember which maker. When I made that comment, I had just saw the twitter post with the guitar in question. My twitter feed is mostly Japanese bands or Japanese guitar makers.
Gotcha! No worries if you aren't able to find it!
 
Messages
1,290
My Classic 6 is about the only guitar I play now, mostly because of RSI to my left shoulder, arm, and hand. The ergonomics are superb, and it sounds dang good to boot.
 

skhan007

Member
Messages
10,514
I've been interested in getting one with a rosewood or ebony board, as I already have a roasted maple board OS6. I've been interested mostly in the Salen. It looks like there are two types with a pao ferro board- Red with the sound hole and without. I'd be interested in hearing opinions on those who own the one with the sound hole. Is it just for looks or can you tell a difference?

The other model that looks good is the Fusion. It would be cool to have the trem and that one looks great!
 

JMMP1

Member
Messages
908
After having owned several, I have mixed feelings:

I love the headless design, in general, and the ergonomic considerations in the design. I’m a huge fan of the endur neck profile, and wish I could get that from other manufacturers (headless or not). I’m not fond of the fanned frets feel, especially on the 7 string I had (and sold). I’d own another at the right price, but just purchased an alternative model to try out (Q52).
 

Dheep

Member
Messages
136
Ive got a Strandberg Boden. Love the size,weight, workmanship & the innovative neck. Replaced the Neck pickup. But all in all a fine Guitar.
 

John Mayo

Member
Messages
168
I was into them at first. But I’m worried about how easy (or not) it is to intonate them. From what I understand the strings have to be off to do it, which seems a bit needlessly complicated.
 

TobyB

Member
Messages
243
I got mine out to play ... a Fusion Boden ... and was reminded of just how sensible and straightforward the neck and the fanned frets feel ... but equally how good the body shape and size is ... like an F-style mandolin it balaces on your thigh or lap, horizontally or at 45 degrees, it hangs on it's strap ...
 

Promit

Member
Messages
2,569
I just sold my Prog 6, I still have a Standard 7.


Honestly, I don't like the neck design. I can work with it, and I'm willing to do so on the 7 because of the other advantages of the guitar. I enjoy the shorter fan fret than usual (26.25" on the long side of the 7, rather than 27".) I like the compactness and lightweight and the way the body is shaped. But I would much prefer a conventional rounded neck profile over the triple flats. The ones I've tried/seen have all been made quite well, play quite well, etc. I didn't like the Strandberg branded passives, my 7 has Fishmans in it. Just wish I could get the same guitar with more of an asymmetric round profile, just like @LaXu said above. Oh and ditto on the bad heel design, particularly on pre-NX models. It is honestly the most intrusive bolt on neck joint I own. It's hard to feel they're worth the considerable asking price, at least for the Indonesian production. For me they are mostly great instruments at ~$1500, not $2500.
 
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